Tag Archives: VMware

vForumAU 2016 Recap: Best Event In Years!

Last week I was in Sydney for the 2016 edition of vForumAU…I’ve been coming to vForumAU since 2011 and this years event was probably up there with the best that I have attended in that time. For the past couple of years the event has had to shift venues due to the Sydney Exhibition Center being knocked down and rebuilt and in that time the it’s been at Luna Park and Star City Casino…both of which presented their own challenges for VMware, sponsors and attendees. This years event was held at The Royal Hall of Industries in Moore Park which offered a perfect venue for the event and helped deliver on what was a great vForumAU.

Adding to the venue was the calibre of speakers that VMware ANZ was able to bring out for this years event…in fact it was the best lineup that I’ve seen or heard of outside of VMworld. We had Pat Gelsinger, Kit Colbert, Paul Strong and Bruce Davie to add to the local VMware talent and given that this event fell after both VMworld US and Europe, I felt that the content was more complete in terms of announcements, products and overall strategy and vision.

I heard Pat deliver the keynote at VMworld US a few months back and the deck was largely the same, however I felt he delivered the message better and talked to the key points around VMware’s hybrid cloud strategy a lot more concisely and with a lot more tact in terms of ensure that vCloud Air Network providers where still very much in the reckoning for VMware’s future strategy around Hybrid cloud. There is no doubt that the partnership’s with AWS and IBM has caused some unease in the vCAN but every key slide had vCAN representation which was pleasing to see.

The Cross Cloud Foundation is something also that still sits uneasily with a lot of vCAN Providers but I have to admit that the tech preview of the Cross Cloud Platform was very very slick and shows how much VMware has changed tact when it comes to playing with other public clouds. There is no doubt that Cloud is the new Hardware and VMware want to be there to manage it and offer it’s customers tools that do the same. Hybrid cloud is here to stay, and they hyper-scalers certainly have a share…however on-premises and partner hosted IaaS will remain significant and relevant for the next 10-15 years.

Moving on from Pat’s keynote there was a super session Technical Keynote that was held after lunch that featured 20-30 minutes on every new product enhancement or release that has been announced of late. From vSphere 6.5 to VSAN 6.5 and a look at NSX futures as well as VMware’s container platforms this was a brilliant couple of hours of presentations. Highlights for me was Paul Strong talking VSAN, Kit Colbert going over the various Photon platforms and Bruce Davie talking around NSX extensibility into AWS. Of note was Bruce Davie (who also presented at the main keynote) who I have come to seriously admire as a speaker over the past couple of years.

The Sponsors hall has a very VMworld feel to it this year which elements of VMworld brought to the event such as VMVillage, special lounges for All Access Pass visitors and probably the best food that I’ve experienced at a vForumAU by way of specialised food trucks bringing a wide array of foods to enjoy. Though the first day wasn’t as well received by exhibitors (AAP attendees pay for sessions, not so much visiting sponsors) in talking with some people on the booths, the second day was very busy and the venue and location had everything to do with that. Again well done do the VMware events team for bringing the event to The Royal Hall of Industries.

Finishing off this recap, once again there was great spirit and community around both sponsors and the attendees to which the venue offered a great chance to catch up socially with people from the VMware community and that fact shouldn’t be lost on the benefit of attending such an event. And while I didn’t attend the offical party I heard that it went really well and was highly entertaining with a lot of food!

Well done to VMware ANZ for putting on a great event!


As a side note, I also attended my final VMware vChampion event on the Wednesday morning where Kit Colbert facilitated an open discussion on containerised platforms and the new continuous integration and continuous deployment methodologies that are creeping their ways into mainstream IT. Again, thanks to the vChampion team!

VMware vChampion Farewell!

About four years ago I was invited to join a program called the VMware vChampions…this program is run and operated by the VMware ANZ Channel and Marketing teams and is an invite only advocacy group who’s members are made up exclusively from VMware’s top partners and service providers in the ANZ region. The numbers have varied over the past couple of years, but at any one time there are about 30-40 vChampions in the group.

With my new role at Veeam I have had to leave the program and this week at #vForumAU will be my last as a member of the group. Before I sign off I wanted to openly thank the people who have made the program such instrumental not only from a personal work point of view, but also from the point of view of enhancing my engagement with the wider VMware community. Probably of most importance, superseding both work and community benefits the program has allowed me to develop friendships with those I have come to meet through the program…some of those people I now consider some of my closest friends.

The program helped take me to my first VMworld in 2012 which is still one of the highlights of my career and an experience that included an VMware Executive Brief at the VMware campus and an introduction to the global VMware community. At vForumAU that same year, the vChampion’s where briefed by then CTO Steve Herrod. The following year at PEX ANZ I was able to work towards landing a dream role at Zettagrid and also establish friendships that are still going strong today. Later that year at vForumAU the vChampions had a whole day event that included a discussion with Martin Casado just shortly after Nicira had been acquired by VMware…the inspiring talk by Martin was, again a career highlight and lit of flame under me that got me into Network Virtualization and deeper into automation.

Over the last couple of years the vChampion program scaled back it’s activities and bi-annual meetings become once a year get togethers however the team was still able to secure guest speakers such as Sanjay Poonen and Kit Colbert. In an amongst the speakers the group was given insider NDA access and product roadmaps…and there in lies the true value of the group for VMware and in equipping the vChampion’s with knowledge and updates the group is equipped to go back to their companies and advocated VMware technologies to the rest of their peers and hopefully also spoke out in the community about VMware technologies.

All in all the value that the program has added to my career can not be understated and I would like to thank, Katrina Jones, Anthony Segren, John Donovan, Rhody Burton and Eugene Geaher for allowing me to be part of such a brilliant program. Also a special mention to Grant Orchard and Greg Mulholland for being the vChampion Champions within VMware and for always being there to help organise and support the vChampions.

Thanks guys and I hope the program can continue to deliver!

VMware on AWS: vCloud Director and What Needs to be Done to Empower the vCAN

Last week VMware and Amazon Web Services officially announced their new joint venture whereby VMware technology will be available to run as a service on AWS in the form of bare-bones hardware with vCenter, ESXi, NSX and VSAN as the core VMware technology components. This isn’t some magic whereby ESXi is nested or emulated upon the existing AWS platform, but a fully fledged dedicated virtual datacenter offering that clients can buy through VMware and have VMware manage the stack right up to the core vCenter components.

Earlier in the week I wrote down some thoughts around the possible impact to the vCloud Air Network this new offering could have. While at first glance it would appear that I was largely negative towards the announcement, after having a think about the possible implications I started to think about how this could be advantageous for the vCloud Air Network. What it comes down to is how much VMware was to open up the API’s for all components hosted on AWS and how the vCloud Director SP product team develops around those API’s.

From there it will be on vCloud Air Network partners that have the capabilities to tap into the VMC’s. I believe there is an opportunity here for vCAN Service Providers to go beyond offering just IaaS and combine their offerings with the VMware AWS offering as well as help extend out to offer AWS PaaS without the worry that traditional VM workloads will be migrated to AWS.

For this to happen though VMware have to do something they haven’t done in the past…that is, commit to making sure vCAN providers can cash in on the opportunity and be empowered by the opportunity to grow VMware based services… as I mentioned in my original post:

In truth VMware have been very slow…almost reluctant to pass over features that would allow this cross cloud compatibility and migration be even more of a weapon for the vCAN by holding back on features that allowed on-premises vCenter and Workstation/Fusion connect directly to vCloud Air endpoints in products such as Hybrid Cloud Manager. I strongly believed that those products should have been extended from day zero to have the ability to connect to any vCloud Director endpoint…it wasn’t a stretch for that to occure as it is effectively the same endpoint but for some reason it was strategically labeled as a “coming soon” feature.

Extending vCloud Director SP:

I have taken liberty to extend the VMWonAWS graphic to include what I believe should be the final puzzle in what would make the partnership sit well with existing vCloud Air Network providers…that is, allow vCloud Director SP to bridge the gap between the on-premises compute, networking and storage and the AWS based VMware platform infrastructure.

vCloud Director is a cloud management platform that abstracts physical resources from vCenter and interacts with NSX to build out networking resources via the NSX Manager API’s…with that it’s not hard in my eyes to allow any exposed vCenter or NSX Manager to be consumed by vCloud Director.

With that allowed, any AWS vCenter dedicated instance can become a Virtual Datacenter object in vCloud Director and consumed by an organisation. For vCloud Air Network partners who have the ability to programatically interact with the vCloud Director APIs, this all of a sudden could open up another 70+ AWS locations on which to allow their customers to deploy Virtual Datacenters.

Take that one step further and allow vCD to overlay on-premises compute and networking resources and then allow connectivity between all locations via NSX hybridity and you have a seriously rock solid solution that extends a customer on-premises to a more conveniently placed (remember AWS isn’t everywhere) vCloud Air Network platform that can in turn consume/burst into a VMware Dedicated instance on AWS and you now have something that rivals the much hyped Hybrid Cloud Strategy of Microsoft and the Azure Stack.

What Needs to Happen:

It’s pretty simple…VMware need to commit to continued/accelerated development of vCloud Director SP (which has already begun in earnest) and give vCloud Air Network providers the ability to consume both ways…on-premises and on VMware’s AWS platform. VMware need to grant this capability to vCloud Air Network providers from the outset and not play the stalling game that was apparent when it came to feature parity with vCloud Air.

What I have envisioned isn’t far off becoming a reality…vCloud Director is mature and extensible enough to do what I have described above, and I believe that in my recent dealings with the vCloud Director product and marketing teams at VMworld US earlier this year that there is real belief in the team that the cloud management platform will continue to improve and evolve…if VMware allow it to.

Further improving on vCloud Directors maturity and extensibility, if the much maligned UI is improved as promised…with the upcoming addition of full NSX integration completing the network stack, the next step in greater adoption beyond the 300 odd vCAN SPs currently use vCloud Director needs a hook…and that hook should be VMWonAWS.

Time will tell…but there is huge potential here. VMware need to deliver to their partners in order to have that VMWonAWS potential realised.

 

VMware on AWS: Thoughts on the Impact to the vCloud Air Network

Last week VMware and Amazon Web Services officially announced their new joint venture whereby VMware technology will be available to run as a service on AWS in the form of bare-bones hardware with vCenter, ESXi, NSX and VSAN as the core VMware technology components. This isn’t some magic whereby ESXi is nested or emulated upon the existing AWS platform, but a fully fledged dedicated virtual datacenter offering that clients can buy through VMware and have VMware manage the stack right up to the core vCenter components.

Note: These initial opinions are just that. There has been a fair bit of Twitter reaction over the announcement, with the majority being somewhat negative towards the VMware strategy. There are a lot of smart guys working on this within VMware and that means it’s got technical focus, not just Exec/Board strategy. There is also a lot of time between this initial announcement and it’s release first release in 2017 however initial perception and reaction to a massive shift in direction should and will generate debate…this is my take from a vCAN point of view.

The key service benefits as taken from the AWS/VMware landing page can be seen below:

Let me start by saying that this is a huge huge deal and can not be underestimated in terms of it’s significance. If I take my vCAN hat off, I can see how and why this was necessary for both parties to help each other fight off the growing challenge from Microsoft’s Azure offering and the upcoming Azure Stack. For AWS, it lets them tap into the enterprise market where they say they have been doing well…though in reality, it’s known that they aren’t doing as well as they had hoped. While for VMware, it helps them look serious about offering a public cloud that is truly hyper-scale and also looks at protecting existing VMware workloads from being moved over to Azure…and to a lesser extent AWS directly.

There is a common enemy here, and to be fair to Microsoft it’s obvious that their own shift in focus and direction has been working and the industry is taking note.

Erasing vCloud Air and The vCAN Impact:

For VMware especially, it can and should erase the absolute disaster that was vCloud Air… Looking back at how the vCloud Air project transpired the best thing to come out of it was the refocus in 2015 of VMware to prop back up the vCloud Air Network, which before that had been looking shaky with the vCANs strongest weapon, vCloud Director, being pushed to the side and it’s future uncertain. In the last twelve months there has an been apparent recommitment to vCloud Director and the vCAN and things had been looking good…however that could be under threat with this announcement…and for me, perception is everything!

Public Show of Focus and Direction:

Have a listen to the CNBC segment embedded above where Pat Gelsinger and AWS CEO Andy Jassy discuss the partnership. Though I wouldn’t expect them to mention the 4000+ strong vCloud Air Network (or the recent partnership with IBM for that matter) the fact that they are openly discussing about the unique industry first benefits the VMWonAWS partnership brings to the market, in the same breath they ignore or put aside the fact that the single biggest advantage that the vCloud Air Network had was VMware workload mobility.

Complete VMware Compatibility:

VMware Cloud on AWS will provide VMware customers with full VM compatibility and seamless workload portability between their on-premises infrastructure and the AWS Cloud without the need for any workload modifications or retooling.

Workload Migration:

VMware Cloud on AWS works seamlessly with vSphere vMotion, allowing you to move running virtual machines from on-premises infrastructure to the AWS Cloud without any downtime. The virtual machines retain network identity and connections, ensuring a seamless migration experience.

The above features are pretty much the biggest weapons that vCloud Air Network partners had in the fight against existing or potential client moving or choosing AWS over their own VMware based platform…and from direct experience, I know that this advantage is massive and does work. With this advantage taken away, vCAN Service Providers may start to loose workloads to AWS at a faster clip than what was done previously.

In truth VMware have been very slow…almost reluctant to pass over features that would allow this cross cloud compatibility and migration be even more of a weapon for the vCAN by holding back on features that allowed on-premises vCenter and Workstation/Fusion connect directly to vCloud Air endpoints in products such as Hybrid Cloud Manager. I strongly believed that those products should have been extended from day zero to have the ability to connect to any vCloud Director endpoint…it wasn’t a stretch for that to occure as it is effectively the same endpoint but for some reason it was strategically labeled as a “coming soon” feature.

VMware Access to Multiple AWS Regions:

VMware Virtual Machines running on AWS can leverage over 70 AWS services covering compute, storage, database, security, analytics, mobile, and IoT. With VMware Cloud on AWS, customers will be able to leverage their existing investment in VMware licenses through customer loyalty programs.

I had mentioned on Twitter that the image below was both awesome and scary mainly because all I think about when I look at it is the overlay of the vCloud Air Network and how VMware actively promote 4000+ vCAN partners contributing to existing VMware customers in being able to leverage their existing investments on vCloud Air Network platforms.

Look familiar?

 

In truth of those 4000+ vCloud Air Network providers there are maybe 300 that are using vCloud Director in some shape or form and of those an even smaller amount that can programatically take advantage of automated provisioning and self service. There in lies one of the biggest issues for the vCAN…while some IaaS providers excel, the majority offer services that can’t stack up next to the hyper-scalers. Because of that, I don’t begrudge VMware to forgetting about the capabilities of the vCAN, but as mentioned above, I believe more could, and still can be been done to help the network complete in the market.

Conclusion:

Right, so that was all the negative stuff as it relates the vCloud Air Network, but I have been thinking about how this can be a positive for both the vCAN and more importantly for me…vCloud Director. I’ll put together another post on where and how I believe VMware can take advantage of this partnership to truly compete against the looming threat of the Azure Stack…with vCAN IaaS providers offering vCloud Director SP front and center of that solution.

References:

http://www.vmware.com/company/news/releases/vmw-newsfeed.VMware-and-AWS-Announce-New-Hybrid-Cloud-Service,-%E2%80%9CVMware-Cloud-on-AWS%E2%80%9D.3188645-manual.html

https://aws.amazon.com/vmware/

VMware Cloud™ on AWS – A Closer Look

https://twitter.com/search?f=tweets&vertical=default&q=VMWonAWS

CBT Bugs – VMware Can’t Keep Letting This Happen!

[UPDATE] – VMware have released an official KB for the CBT issue.

Sadly if you recognize the title of this post it’s because this isn’t the first time I’ve felt compelled to write about the continued industry frustration with some repeat ESXi bugs. In February I wrote in general around the recent history of bugs slipping through VMware QA. Four months later and there has been another CBT bug slip through the net…just to reaffirm the core message of my last post I talked about the fact:

There are a number of competing vendors (and industry watchers) waiting to capitalize on any weakness shown in the VMware stack and with the recent number of QA issues leading to a significant bugs popping up not abating, I wonder how much longer VMware can afford to continue to slip up before it genuinely hurts its standing

The one area of absolute concern is the amount of Change Blog Tracking bugs that seems to slip into new builds of ESXi. This time it’s Express Patch 6 for ESXi 6 (Build 3825889) that contains an apparently new symptom of our old friend the CBT Bug. The patch it’s self is a fairly critical one for those running VSAN and VMXNET3 NICs as it addresses some core issues around them but if you use quiesced snapshots duing a VM Backup may have issues with CBT. The vmware.log of a VM being backed up will contain:

vcpu-0| xxxx: SNAPSHOT:SnapshotBranchDisk: Failed to acquire current epoch for disk /vmfs/volumes/
vmdk : Change tracking is not active for this disk xxx.

For a detailed explanation of the issue go to: http://www.running-system.com/take-care-express-patch-6-esxi-6-can-break-backup-cbt-bug/ 

[UPDATE]

VMware Support is aware of this issue and are currently working on it.
This KB article will be updated once the fix for this issue is released.

To work around this issue, apply one of these options:

Again as a Service Provider the CBT bugs are the most worrying because they fundamentally threaten the integrity of backup data which is not something that IT Operation staff or end users who’s data is put at risk should have to worry about and most backup vendor’s use CBT to make backups more efficient. In this case…specifically if you use Veeam the lack of CBT will extend backup windows and increase the chances of VMs not being backed up as expected.

VMware need to continue to nail ESXi (and vCenter) as well as keeping focus on the new products. VSAN, NSX and everything that VMware offers runs on or off of ESXi and though hypervisors are not as front of mind anymore, everything that VMware does relies on ESXi and VMware partners who create products to work with ESXi need it to be stable…especially around backups. Everyone needs to backup with absolute confidence…the more these CBT bugs appear the less confident pundits become…I already hear of people not wanting to go to ESXi 6.0 because of issues like such as this latest one.

That’s not a good place for VMware to be.

Note: I had sat on this post since Friday, but reading through Anton’s Veeam Community Forums Digest this morning where he lamented the lack of QC and repeat issues. He suggest’s that this is the new normal…and that maybe the thing to do is wait and hope for vSphere 6.5…not a good situation. However, like me he also believes that this can be fixed…but it needs to happen before the next release.

References:

https://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2144685

 

 

Quick Post: ESXi 6.0 Patch Breaks Veeam Instant VM Recovery

This is a quick post to alert Veeam users to an issue that was raised in the Veeam Community Forums yesterday…firstly if you are a Veeam customer and are not registered for the Veeam Community Forum Digest that Anton Gostev releases every Sunday night then stop reading this and go register here! There is some awesome content that Anton covers and its not just limited to backups but general industry news and trends as well.

Once you have done that I thought I would bring to everyone’s attention an important note that Gostev mentioned in his last update relating to an issue with Veeam Instant Recovery and all dependent features when ESXi 6.0 Patch 6 (Build  3825889) is installed.

This patch was released on the 12th of May so chances are some people have deployed it and are being impacted if they use or rely on Instant Recovery. As Gostev mentions, Veeam have an ongoing support case with VMware but as is usual with Veeam they have gone ahead and got a workaround in place in the form of a hotfix which is applicable to Veeam 9.0 Update 1.

If you have deployed this ESXi 6.0 build and run Veeam contact their support to grab the hotfix. Again well done to the Veeam development teams for working around issues so efficiently.

References:

https://forums.veeam.com/ucp.php?mode=register&sid=1a1ab7f2950f864f9bd3a4e4d2f0dcce

https://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2136186

ESXi Bugs – VMware Can’t Keep Letting This Happen!

VMware is at an interesting place at this point in time…there is still no doubting that ESXi and vCenter are the market leaders in terms of Hypervisor Platform and that the vCloud Suite offers a strong portfolio of management, automation and monitoring tools. However VMware has become the hunted and is suffering what most massivly successful tech companies go through after a sustained period of uninterrupted success…there are those that want to see it burn!

There are a number of competing vendors (and industry watchers) waiting to capitalize on any weakness shown in the VMware stack and with the recent number of QA issues leading to a significant bugs popping up not abating, I wonder how much longer VMware can afford to continue to slip up before it genuinely hurts its standing.

The latest couple to watch out for have become common repeat offenders since the 5.5 release…problems with vMotion, Pathing leading to PDLs/APDs and CBT issues have seemed to be on repeat if you search through the VMwareKBs over the past twelve to eighteen months.

KB2143943 – vMotion Fails After Upgrading from a number of builds
KB2144657 – ESXi 6 may not fail over correctly after encountering a PDL

As a Service Provider the CBT bugs are the most worrying because they fundamentally threaten the integrity of backup data which is not something that IT Operation staff or end users who’s data is put at risk should have to worry about. Veeam have done a great job circumventing the issue, though these issues are being fixed with drastic measures like full CBT resets…On a IaaS Platform where machines are not easily scheduled for downtime this is a massive issue.

I know that VMware are not purposely going out of their way to produce these errors, and I am sure that there are individuals and teams getting an ass whipping internally. But it has to stop…the quality of what is released to the public for consumption can’t continue to suffer from these issues. Their lead is secure for the moment and VMware have an extremely passionate and committed supporter base and even though their hypervisor competitors are not free of devastating bugs themselves (in fact ESXi was still the least patched hypervisor platform of in the last 12 months) it’s not a lead VMware can afford to let slip any more…specially with ESXi and vCenter are still at the heart of what VMware is trying achieve through new focus products like NSX and VSAN.

To be fair the VMware team do a great job and keep everyone up to date with issues as they arise and are generally fixed in quick time…VMware can’t afford to have many more:

Resolution:
This is a known issue affecting ESXi 6.0.
Currently, there is no resolution.

Especially if they are repeat bugs!

http://blogs.vmware.com/kbdigest/ 

Rubrik Hands On: Initial Setup and Configuration

Late last year I attended a bloggers briefing for the launch of Rubrik Converged Data Management where the secondary storage startup announced version 2.0 of their hardware plus software backup platform. This week Rubrik will be presenting at Tech Field Day 10 and have just relaunched their website to coincide with some new announcements.

Is it safe to say backups are cool again…and even though Veeam have been making backups cool for a while Rubrik are looking to raise the bar and make backups even cooler and above all…highly salable and trustworthy.

For an overview of what Rubrik is and what it’s trying to achieve, click here to go through my introductory post. Below are some screen shots and a quick walk though of the Rubrik setup and first configuration steps taken from the POC box that I have in the Zettagrid Labs testing with the help of Frank Yoo.

Initial Setup and Configuration:

As with most startups these days the initial setup and configuration is heavily guided with the help of a Rubrik engineer…they even offered to fly out the resource (Frank) to do an onsite install over here in Perth which wasn’t required. After racking and stacking the R344 series appliance we connected up a laptop to the same subnet as the management network ports. The setup is fairly automated and makes use of the Bonjour service as well as the inbuilt smarts Rubrik have baked in.

Once the initial node has been reached via a web browser you are ready to set up the default admin user and you go through and configure the basic network settings (note these can’t be modified later without getting into the backend) and NTP configuration.

You next set each of the four nodes Management and Data addresses. The data network will be used to talk to the ESXi hosts and act as the pathway to mount NFS shares for VM restores.

After about 5 minutes you are ready to log in. The architecture of the Rubrik block is such that you can hit any of the IP addresses to enter the management UI.

The interface is fluid and simple to operate with a number of informational dashboards throughout the various menu options.

From the Top Right Configuration Icon you can work through the different options and the Rubrik team have made it straight forward to configure users, add target vCenter instances as well as setting replication and archive endpoints.

You can add multiple vCenter servers and all you need to connect is the IP address and a vCenter account with the necessary privileges.

You can also connect to an Active Directory domain for user authentication however this feature is still a little underdone and doesn’t let you do any role based access control yet.

Once connected to AD you get a list of all users from which you can modify through the UI and grant access permissions to.

The left hand menu is used to navigate through the Backup operations as well as reporting.

The static images don’t do the UI justice and as you can see below there is lots of details when it comes to node configuration, usage and overall health as well as current IO throughput numbers and disk performance.
So there is a quick walk through of some of the main screens of the UI as you install and configure the Rubrik Backup Appliance for the first time. It really is a quick start to finish from the time the nodes are first powered up to when you are able to do your first VM backup and there isn’t too much to grasp in terms of mastering the interfaces knobs and dials.

I am hoping that there are some more great announcements at TFD10 that further enhance the feature set included in v2.0 and I’m looking forward to going through a few more blog posts around setting up SLA Domains that essentially dictate backup frequency as well as the archival and replication features that are currently available.

I like the fact Rubrik have well and truly shaken up the backup market and that can only serve to increase the quality of all vendors in the space as backups continue to be a challenge within IT.

References:

http://www.rubrik.com/solutions/automated-backup-instant-recovery/

Quick Fix: vCenter 5.5 Update 3x Phone Home Warning and VPXD Service not Starting

This week I’ve been upgrading vCenter in a couple of our labs and came across this issue during and after the upgrade of vCenter from 5.5 Update 2 to 5.5 Update 3a or 3b. During the upgrade of the vCenter the error below is thrown.

It’s an easy one to ignore as it only relates to the Phone Home Service…which to be honest I didn’t think would or was important at the time. When you click ok the installed finished as being successful, however the vCenter Service is not brought up automatically and when you go to start the service you get the following error from the services manager.

Not sure why the Googling for this particular error wasn’t as straight forward to search against but if you search to Error 1053 or Error 1053 + VMware you get referenced to some generic forum issues and this VMware KB which is a red herring in relation to this error. With that I went back to search against the Phone Home Warning 32014 and got a hit against this VMware KB which contains the exact error and reference to the deployPkg.dll that you would see in the Windows Application Event Logs when you try to start the vCenter Service.

The KB title is a little misleading in that it states

Updating vCenter Server 5.5 to Update 3 fails with the error: Warning 32014

However the fix is the right fix and after working through the work around in the KB the upgrades went through without issue and vCenter was at 5.5 Update 3b.

References:

http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2134141

http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2069296

Quick Fix: Python Error When Removing PernixData FVP Host Extensions

Came across an issue this morning trying to remove old 2.0 PernixData FVP Host Extensions from an ESXi 5.5 Update 3a Host. When running the uninstall script I was getting the error shown below.

There is an old known issue with the version of Python that gets installed with the latest updates of ESXi 5.x and older versions of the FVP Host extensions.

FVP compatibility with ESXi 5.5, 5.1, and 5.0, and Python 2.7
Date announced: March 31, 2015
Upgrade issues exist with various ESXi 5.5, 5.1, and 5.0 releases that upgrade to Python 2.7, which is not compatible with FVP 2.5.0.1 or lower. Upgrading to any ESXi 5.5, 5.1, or 5.0 patch that upgrades the Python version to 2.7 (or later) requires an FVP upgrade to 2.5.0.2 or later. For additional information, please reference KB 1230.

That internal PernixData KB isn’t working at the moment, but I worked out a series of steps to get to a point where the FVP Extensions can be removed. If you have FVP installed with these versions:

  • FVP 1.5
  • FVP 2.0.0.0-3
  • FVP 2.0.1.0-5
  • FVP 2.5.0.0-1

You can apply the same steps to resolve the issue.

  1. Check the Status of the FVP Service
  2. Install over the top of the currently installed version at least 2.5.0.4-37360
  3. Reboot the Host
  4. Run the Uninstall Script

The Shell Dump is below of the steps above.

 

« Older Entries