The Separation of Dev and Ops is Upon Us!

Apart from the K word, there was one other enduring message that I think a lot of people took home from VMworld 2019. That is, that Dev and Ops should be considered as seperate entities again. For the best part of the last five or so years the concept of DevOps, SecOps and other X-Ops has been perpetuated mainly due to the rise of consumable platforms outside the traditional control of IT operations people.

The pressure to DevOp has become very real in the IT communities that I am involved with. These circles are mainly made up of traditional infrastructure guys. I’ve written a few pieces around how the industry trend to try turn everyone into developers isn’t one that needs to be followed. Automation doesn’t equal development and there are a number of Infrastructure as Code tools that looks to bridge the gap between the developer and the infrastructure guy.

That isn’t to say that traditional IT guys shouldn’t be looking to push themselves to learn new things and improve and evolve. In fact, IT Ops needs to be able to code in slightly abstracted ways to work with APIs or leverage IaC tooling. However my view is that IT Ops number one role is to understand fundamentally what is happening within a platform, and be able to support infrastructure that developers can consume.

I had a bit of an aha moment this week while working on some Kubernetes (that word again!) automation work with Terraform which I’ll release later this week. The moment was when I was trying to get the Sock Shop demo working on my fresh Kubernetes cluster. I finally understood why Kubernetes had been created. Everything about the application was defined in the json files and deployed as is holistically through one command. It’s actually rather elegant compared to how I worked with developers back in the early days of web hosting on Windows and Linux web servers with their database backends and whatnot.

Regardless of the ease of deployment, I still had to understand the underlying networking and get the application to listen on external IPs and different ports. At this point I was doing dev and doing IT Ops in one. However this is all contained within my lab environment that has no bearing on the availability of the application, security or otherwise. This is where separation is required.

For developers, they want to consume services and take advantages of the constructs of a containerised platform like Docker paired together with the orchestrations and management of those resources that Kubernetes provides. They don’t care what’s under the hood and shouldn’t be concerned what their application runs on.

For IT Operations they want to be able to manage the supporting platforms as they did previously. The compute, the networking the storage… this is all still relevant in a hybrid world. They should absolutely still care about what’s under the hood and the impact applications can have to infrastructure.

VMware has introduced that (re)split of dev and ops with the introduction of Project Pacific and I applaude them for going against the grain and endorsing the separation of roles and responsibilities. Kubernetes and ESXi in one vSphere platform is where that vision lies. Outside of vSphere, it is still very true that devs can consume public clouds without a care about underlying infrastructure… but for me… it all comes back down to this…

Let devs be devs… and let IT Ops be IT Ops! They need to work together in this hybrid, multi-cloud world!

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