Author Archives: Anthony Spiteri

vExpert 2018 – The Value Remains!

After a longer than expected deliberation period the vExpert class of 2018 was announced late last Friday (US Time).  I’ve been a vExpert since 2012 with 2018 marking my seventh year in the program. I’ve written a lot about the program over the past three or four years since it’s “perceived” value started to go downhill. I’ve criticised parts of the program around the relative ease at which some people where accepted and also on the apparent inability for numbers to be better managed.

However, make no mistake I am still a believer in the value of the vExpert and more importantly I have come to realise over the past few years (solidified over the past couple of months) that apart from the advocacy component that’s critical to the programs existence…people continue to hold the program in extremely high regard.

There are a large number of vExpert’s who expect entry year after year, and rightly so. In truth there are a large number that legitimately demand membership. But there are others who have struggled to be accepted year after year and for who, acceptance into the program represents a significant achievement.

That is to say that while many established vExpert’s assume entry there are a number of people that desire entry. This is an important indicator on the strength of the program and the continued high regard the vExpert program should still be held in.  It’s easy to criticise from the inside, however that can’t be allowed to tarnish the reputation of program externally.

This is a great program and one that is valued by the majority of those who actively participate. VMware still commands a loyal community base and the vExpert’s lead from the front in this regard. Remembering that it’s all about the advocacy!

Well done again to the team behind the scenes…The new website is testament to the program moving forward. The vExpert team are critical the success of the program and having been part of the much smaller Veeam Vanguard program, I have a lot of respect for the effort that goes into sorting through two thousand odd applications and renewals.

And finally, well done to those first time vExpert’s! Welcome aboard!


For those wondering, here are the official benefits of the program:

  • Invite to our private #Slack channel
  • vExpert certificate signed by our CEO Pat Gelsinger.
  • Private forums on
  • Permission to use the vExpert logo on cards, website, etc for one year
  • Access to a private directory for networking, etc.
  • Exclusive gifts from various VMware partners.
  • Private webinars with VMware partners as well as NFRs.
  • Access to private betas (subject to admission by beta teams).
  • 365-day eval licenses for most products for home lab / cloud providers.
  • Private pre-launch briefings via our blogger briefing pre-VMworld (subject to admission by product teams)
  • Blogger early access program for vSphere and some other products.
  • Featured in a public vExpert online directory.
  • Access to vetted VMware & Virtualization content for your social channels.
  • Yearly vExpert parties at both VMworld US and VMworld Europe events.
  • Identification as a vExpert at both VMworld US and VMworld EU.

Released: vCloud Director 9.1 – New HTML5 Features, vCD-CLI and more!

Overnight VMware released vCloud Director 9.1 (build 7905680) which builds on the 9.0 release that came out last September. This continues to deliver on VMware’s promise to release major vCD updates every six months or so. This update, on the surface contains fewer big ticket items than the 9.0 release however the enhancements included are actually significant and continue to build on where 9.0 left off.

New Features and Enhancements:
  • Enhanced Tenant Portal
  • HTML Provider Portal
  • User Interface Extensibility
  • Service Integration
  • Standalone VMRC
  • Multi-Site Management View
  • SR-IOV
  • FIPS Mode
  • Python SDK
  • vCD-CLI
  • vRealize Orchestrator Integration
Enhanced Tenant Portal:

The new Tenant UI features include vApp and Catalog enhancements while delivering on probably the biggest pain point with the Flex UI tenant portal…that is OFV/OVA management. We now have native upload and download integration without the need for the client integration plugin.

You now also get an overview of resources consumed in your Virtual Datacenters and also get a view of the multiple organisation feature introduced into 9.0.

A new Provider Portal has been seeded in this release and at the moment can only be used for the new vRealise Orchestrator extensibility functionality. The administrator can import workflows from vRO through the import option. An administrator clicks the import workflow button, selects the vRO instance, and then chooses all the workflows they would like to import. On that note, there is an updated vRO Plug-In that allows both providers and tenants to automate tasks from the portal which is an excellent feature.

There is also a new workflow for the provision of standalone VMs and vApps.

Standalone VMRC:

If the management of OVAs/OVFs wasn’t the number one pain point with the FlexUI then the next one would have had to be the pain caused by the lack of functionality in the Console window. A HTML VM console is supported in version 9.0, but 9.1 now adds support for standalone VMware Remote Console. The VMRC provides more functions such for the tenant and significantly improves access to the VM consoles and gives greater flexibility accessing the VMs.


I’ve blogged about the old VCA-CLI on a number of occasions and it’s great to see the project officially brought back into the vCD world. Development on this stopped for a while with the demise of vCloud Air, however I’m glad to see it picked up on as it’s a great tool for managing vCloud Director tenant Organisations and objects from a command line without having to get stuck into the APIs directly. It’s also used for the new Container Services Extension that has also been released side by side with this release of vCD.

Compatibility with Veeam, vSphere 6.5 and NSX-v 6.4.x:

vCloud Director 9.1 is compatible with vSphere 6.5 Update 1 and NSX-v 6.4 and supports full interoperability with other versions as shown in the VMware Product Interoperability Matrix. With regards to Veeam support, I am sure that our QA department will be testing the 9.1 release against our integration pieces at the first opportunity they get, but as of now, there is no ETA on offical support.

A list of known issues can be found in the release notes.


Overall this is a very strong release with a lot of emphasis on extensibility behind the visual enhancements and functionality of the ever evolving HTML Tenant UI. As usual, I’ll look to write a few more blog posts on specific 9.1 features over the next couple of weeks.

There is a White Paper where you can find more details about what’s contained in the 9.1 release. Tom Fojta and Daniel Paluszek VMware have a what’s new blog posts as well.



VMware vCloud Director 9.1 is out!

VMware Cloud Briefing Roundup – VMware Cloud on AWS and other Updates

VMware has held it’s first ever VMware Cloud Briefing today. This is an online, global event with an agenda featuring a keynote from Pat Gelsinger, new announcements and demos relating to VMware Cloud as well as discussions on cloud trends and market momentum. Key to the messaging is the fact that applications are driving cloud initiatives weather that be via delivering new SaaS or cloud applications as well as extending networks beyond traditional barriers while modernizing the datacenter.

The VMware Cloud is looking like a complete vision at this point and the graphic below highlights that fact. There are multiple partners offering VMware based Cloud Infrastructure along with the Public Cloud and SaaS providers. On top of that, VMware now talks about a complete cloud management layer underpinned by vSphere and NSX technologies.

VMware Cloud on AWS Updates:

The big news on the VMware Cloud on AWS front is that there is a new UK based service offering and continued expansion into Germany. This will extend into the APAC region later in the year.

VMware Cloud on AWS will also have support for stretch clusters using the same vSAN and NSX technologies used on-premises on top of the underlying AWS compute and networking platform. This looks to extend application uptime across AWS Availability Zones within AWS regions.

This will feature

  • Zero RPO high Availability across AZs
  • Built into the infrastructure layer with synchronous replication
  • Stretched Cluster with common logical networks with vSphere HA/DRS
  • If an AZ goes down it’s treated as a HA event and impacted VMs brought back in other AZ

They are also adding vSAN Compression and Deduplication for VMware Cloud on AWS services which in theory will save 40% in storage.

VMware Cloud Services Updates:

Hybrid Cloud Extension HCX (first announced at VMworld last year) has a new on-premises offering and is expanding availability through VMware Cloud Provider Partners. This included VMware Cloud on AWS, IBM Cloud and OVH. The promise here is an any-to-any vSphere migration that cross version while being still secure. We are talking about Hybridity here!

Log Intelligence is an interesting one…it looks like Log Insight delivered as a SaaS application. It is a real-time big data log management platform for VMware Cloud on AWS adding real-time visibility into infrastructure and application logs for faster troubleshooting. It support any SYSLOG source and will ingest over the internet in theory.

Cost Insight is an assessment tool for private cloud to VMware Cloud on AWS Migration. It calculates VMware Cloud on AWS capacity required to migrate from on-premises to VMC. It has integration with Network insight to calculate networking costs during migration as well.

Finally there is an update to Wavefront that expands inputs and integrations to enhance visibility and monitoring. There are 45 new integrations, monitoring of native AWS services and integration into vRealize Operations.

You can watch the whole event here.

Veeam Vault #10: Latest Veeam Releases and Vanguard 2018 Update

Welcome to the 10th edition of Veeam Vault and the first one for 2018. It’s pretty crazy to think that we have already completed two months of the year. After an extremely hectic first half of January attending two of our Veeam Velocity Sales Kick off events (Bangkok for APJ and Saint Petersburg for EMEA) i’ve been working from the home office for close to six weeks. It’s been a productive time organising content and working with different Cloud teams across the business to help enable our VCSPs to take advantage our our cloud technologies and help them drive services revenue.

Getting stuck into this edition, I’ll cover the releases of Veeam Availability Orchestrator, the Infinidat Storage Plugin and Update 5 for the Veeam Management Pack… all of which happened over the last week. I’ll talk about the Veeam Vanguard Program for 2018 as well as link to Veeam related content the Vanguard crew have put out over the past couple of months.

Veeam Availability Orchestrator:

Veeam Availability Orchestrator has been in the works for a while now and it’s great to see it hit GA. It boasts an automated and resilient orchestration engine for Veeam Backup & Replication replicas, designed specifically to help enterprises with compliance requirements. One of it’s biggest features is helping to reduce the cost and effort associated with planning for and recovering from a disaster through the automatic creation, documentation and testing of disaster recovery plans.

For a deeper look at it’s features and functionality, Michael White has a good overview post on VAO here.

Infinidat Storage Plugin:

Our new Universal Storage Integration API that was introduced with the release of Update 3 for Backup & Replication 9.5 allows approved Veeam Alliance Partners to build their own storage plug-ins to enable rapid development of primary storage integrations. Infinidat is our first Alliance Partner to integrate through the Universal Storage Integration API. This adds to existing integrations with Cisco, Dell EMC, HPE, IBM, Lenovo and NetApp.

My fellow Technologist, Michael Cade has written up a blog post explaining how to download and install the plugin for those customers using Infindat as their storage backend.

Veeam Management Pack Update 5:

Update 5 for Management Pack went GA today and there are a few new things this release that builds off of the Update release 4 last year. below is a quick rundown of what’s new in this update.

  • Built-in monitoring for Veeam Agent for Microsoft Windows
  • Morning Coffee Dashboard for at-a-glance, real-time health status of your Veeam backup environments
  • Monitoring for VMware Cloud on Amazon Web Services (AWS)
  • Additional VMware vSAN & vCenter Alarms

It’s pleasing to see support for VMware Cloud on AWS as that starts to look to gain momentum in the market and also great to see us enhancing our vSAN alarms as that product also evolves. For a detailed description of the new features, read the release post here.

Veeam Vanguard 2018:

Overnight we notified new and returning members of their successful application for the Veeam Vanguard program for 2018. This is one of the most hotly sort after influencer programs in our industry and I can tell you that the process to vote for and accept applicants was tough this year. The Product Strategy team takes a lot of care and effort in selecting the group and it represents the best Veeam advocates going round. We work closely with the group and their feedback plays a key part in our feedback loop as well as help us to promote Veeam and Veeam products within their companies and spheres of influence.

Well done to the 2018 nominees!

Veeam Vanguard Blog Post Roundup:

NSX Bytes: Updated – NSX Edge Feature and Performance Matrix

For a few years now i’ve been compiling features and throughput numbers for NSX Edge Services Gateways. This started off comparing features and performance metrics between vShield Edges and NSX Edges. As the product evolves, so does it’s capabilities and given the last time I updated this was around the time of NSX-v 6.2 I thought it was time for an update.

A reminder that VMware announced the End of Availability (“EOA”) of the VMware vCloud Networking and Security 5.5.x that kicked in on the September of 19, 2016 and that from vCloud Director 8.10 and above vShield Edges are no longer supported…hence why I don’t have the VSE listed in the tables. For those still running VSEs for what ever reason, you can reference my original post here.

As a refresher…what is an Edge device?

The Edge Services Gateway (NSX-v) connects isolated, stub networks to shared (uplink) networks by providing common gateway services such as DHCP, VPN, NAT, dynamic routing, and Load Balancing. Common deployments of Edges include in the DMZ, VPN Extranets, and multi-tenant Cloud environments where the Edge creates virtual boundaries for each tenant.

The following relates to ESG maximums per NSX and ESXi maximums.

Item Maximums
ESGs per NSX Manager 2,000
ESGs per ESXi Host 250
ESG Interfaces 10 (Including Internal, Uplink and Trunk)
ESG Subinterfaces 200
The function of an ESG is as follows:

The ESG gives you access to all NSX Edge services such as firewall, NAT, DHCP, VPN, load balancing, and high availability. You can install multiple ESG virtual appliances in a datacenter. Each ESG virtual appliance can have a total of ten uplink and internal network interfaces. With a trunk, an ESG can have up to 200 subinterfaces. The internal interfaces connect to secured port groups and act as the gateway for all protected virtual machines in the port group. The subnet assigned to the internal interface can be a publicly routed IP space or a NATed/routed RFC 1918 private space. Firewall rules and other NSX Edge services are enforced on traffic between network interfaces.

Below is a list of services provided by the NSX Edge.

Service Description
Firewall Supported rules include IP 5-tuple configuration with IP and port ranges for stateful inspection for all protocols
NAT Separate controls for Source and Destination IP addresses, as well as port translation
DHCP Configuration of IP pools, gateways, DNS servers, and search domains
Site to Site VPN Uses standardized IPsec protocol settings to interoperate with all major VPN vendors
SSL VPN SSL VPN-Plus enables remote users to connect securely to private networks behind a NSX Edge gateway
Load Balancing Simple and dynamically configurable virtual IP addresses and server groups
High Availability High availability ensures an active NSX Edge on the network in case the primary NSX Edge virtual machine is unavailable
Syslog Syslog export for all services to remote servers
L2 VPN Provides the ability to stretch your L2 network.
Dynamic Routing Provides the necessary forwarding information between layer 2 broadcast domains, thereby allowing you to decrease layer 2 broadcast domains and improve network efficiency and scale. Provides North-South connectivity, thereby enabling tenants to access public networks.

Below is a table that shows the different sizes of each edge appliance and what (if any) impact that has to the performance of each service. As a disclaimer the below numbers have been cherry picked from different sources and are subject to change.

NSX Edge (Compact) NSX Edge (Large) NSX Edge (Quad-Large) NSX Edge (X-Large)
vCPU 1 2 4 6
Memory 512MB 1GB 1GB 8GB
Disk 512MB 512MB 512MB 4.5GB + 4GB
Interfaces 10 10 10 10
Sub Interfaces (Trunk) 200 200 200 200
NAT Rules 2,048 4,096 4,096 8,192
ARP Entries
Until Overwrite
1,024 2,048 2,048 2,048
FW Rules 2000 2000 2000 2000
FW Performance 3Gbps 9.7Gbps 9.7Gbps 9.7Gbps
DHCP Pools 20,000  20,000  20,000  20,000
ECMP Paths 8 8 8 8
Static Routes 2,048 2,048 2,048 2,048
LB Pools 64 64 64 1,024
LB Virtual Servers 64 64 64 1,024
LB Server / Pool 32 32 32 32
LB Health Checks 320 320 320 3,072
LB Application Rules 4,096 4,096 4,096 4,096
L2VPN Clients Hub to Spoke 5 5 5 5
L2VPN Networks per Client/Server 200 200 200 200
IPSec Tunnels 512 1,600 4,096 6,000
SSLVPN Tunnels 50 100 100 1,000
SSLVPN Private Networks 16 16 16 16
Concurrent Sessions 64,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000
Sessions/Second 8,000 50,000 50,000 50,000
LB Throughput L7 Proxy) 2.2Gbps 2.2Gbps 3Gbps
LB Throughput L4 Mode) 6Gbps 6Gbps 6Gbps
LB Connections/s (L7 Proxy) 46,000 50,000 50,000
LB Concurrent Connections (L7 Proxy) 8,000 60,000 60,000
LB Connections/s (L4 Mode) 50,000 50,000 50,000
LB Concurrent Connections (L4 Mode) 600,000 1,000,000 1,000,000
BGP Routes 20,000 50,000 250,000 250,000
BGP Neighbors 10 20 100 100
BGP Routes Redistributed No Limit No Limit No Limit No Limit
OSPF Routes 20,000 50,000 100,000 100,000
OSPF LSA Entries Max 750 Type-1 20,000 50,000 100,000 100,000
OSPF Adjacencies 10 20 40 40
OSPF Routes Redistributed 2000 5000 20,000 20,000
Total Routes 20,000 50,000 250,000 250,000

Of interest from the above table it doesn’t list any Load Balancing performance number for the NSX Compact Edge…take that to mean that if you want to do any sort of load balancing you will need NSX Large and above. To finish up, below is a table describing each NSX Edge size use case.

Use Case
NSX Edge (Compact) Small Deployment, POCs and single service use
NSX Edge (Large) Small/Medium DC or mult-tenant
NSX Edge (Quad-Large) High Throughput ECMP or High Performance Firewall
NSX Edge (X-Large) L7 Load Balancing, Dedicated Core

The Quad Large model is suitable for high performance firewall abilities and the X-Large is suitable for both high performance load balancing and routing. You can convert between NSX Edge service gateway sizes upon demand using a non-disruptive upgrade process, so the recommendation is to begin with the Large model and scale up if necessary. A Large NSX Edge service gateway is suitable for medium firewall performance but as detailed later, the NSX Edge service gateway does not perform the majority of firewall functions.


Veeam Availability Console now available from Azure Marketplace

Last week the Veeam Availability Console Azure Marketplace appliance went live. This allows Veeam Cloud and Service Providers to easily deploy VAC into any Azure region. In it’s previous incarnation the Managed Backup Portal was only available as an Azure marketplace appliance and not available to install by a VCSP. Now that VAC 2.0 is out, VCSPs who don’t have the ability to host Cloud Connect or VAC on their infrastructure can deploy it in Azure and have the service up and running within fifteen minutes.

There are some limitations that come along with deploying VAC into Azure and it won’t be for everyone. The biggest caveat is that you can only have one Cloud Connect Server per VAC instance and as part of the deployment, Cloud Connect services is installed on the same Virtual Machine. You can’t offer Replication services from the Azure instance, and if offering Cloud Connect backup you need to understand it’s own scalability and performance bottlenecks. That said, as a remote management, monitoring, reporting, billing and self service platform there is a lot to like about having VAC in Azure.

Marketplace Deployment Steps:

You can start the deployment by searching for Veeam Availability Console in the Azure Marketplace or you can go direct to the product page here.

Click on Create to start the configuration steps.

The Basics includes VM name, hard disks type, username and password as well as selecting the subscription, the ability to use a new or existing resource group and finally the Azure location you want to deploy into.

In Step 2 you need to choose the Size of the Azure instance. The template provides the recommended configurations. The sizes are relative to the amount of agents and/or Backup & Replication instances you are going to be managing from this instance. You can find sizing guides here for larger environments.

I ended up going with an A2 standard for my instance which removes the load balancing functionality from the configuration and offers a little less IOPS. Step 3 contains some optional extra’s to ensure a higher level of availability for the VM instance and lets you configure the networking. Once that’s done you can review your configuration settings and start the deployment. It took just over 8 minutes for the deployment to succeed.

If you click on the Virtual Machine object in the Azure Portal you will see an overview of the VM and it’s configuration.

Addition Azure Configuration:

If you notice in the image above, a DNS name is listed in the overview. This was something that I had to set manually after the deployment. You set this by going into the Networking of the resource pool and click on IP Configuration. Here, you can enter in a DNS name relative to the Azure zone you are in. You can then use this to connect to the VAC Console, Cloud Connect Service and to RDP to the VM and helps in the event of having a dynamic, rather than a static Azure IP.

Speaking of networking and ports, below is a list of the default port rules created during the deployment. Note that WinRM is open as well.

Finalizing Deployment:

After deploying the Azure Marketplace appliance you can RDP into the VM and complete the setup that includes configuring Cloud Connect and VAC it’s self. A few things have been done for us as part of the deployment, however the first thing you need to do is get a license. This is a BYO license situation, so once you have deployed the Marketplace appliance you will need to source a VAC license from the Veeam Licensing Portal and apply.

Head to the VAC Web Portal and Install the License.

Once done the last step is to configure Cloud Connect from the Backup & Replication Console. Again, you will need a valid Cloud Connect license as you are greeted with the Free Edition when you connect to the console for the first time. As per normal with Cloud Connect, you need to configure the SSL Certificate first and then configure a new Cloud Gateway. Configure the Networking as shown below using the DNS name that was created in the steps above.

Once this is completed you can go into the VAC Console and work through the normal Configuration steps. The only thing you don’t need to do is add the Cloud Connect Server to the VAC instance as this has already been done during the initial deployment process.

It’s worth noting that the versions of Backup & Replication ( and Availability Console ( are up to date and include the latest Hot-Fixes for VAC. The intent is to have the templates as up to date as possible, however once deployed you can upgrade as per usual.


So there you have it…within fifteen minutes you can have a fully working Veeam Availability Console instance running in Azure and ready to be used to offer all the goodness that VAC offers our Cloud and Service Provider partners. For an overview as to what VAC offers, click here and have a read of my GA post on What’s in It for Service Providers.



Released: Runecast Analyzer 1.7 with vSAN Support

Runecast has released version 1.7 of their Analyzer today and it has added support for VMware vSAN. By using a number of resources within VMware’s knowledge base Runecast offers a platform that looks at best practices, log information and security hardening guides to monitor your vSphere infrastructure which in turn brings to your attention issues through a simple yet intuitive interface. This now extends to vSAN as well. Also in this release is an improved dashboard called the VMware Stack view and improved vSphere Web Plugin.

Version 1.7 focuses on VMware vSAN support and proactive issue detection with remediation. vSAN, having gained market lead in the HCI space is deployed in vSphere environments more commonly these days as the storage component. It is critical to not only monitor performance but also keep the vSAN configuration in the best condition and prevent from any future failures or outages.

Runecast Analyzer v1.7 scans vSAN clusters and looks at cluster configurations against a large database of VMware Knowledge Base and Best Practices rules. This results in the ability to list issues and then offer suggestions on how to fix those issues which may affect vSAN availability or functionality. This acts as a good way to stop issues before they become more serious problems that impact environments.

As mentioned version 1.7 also offers an upgrade to the vSphere Web Client and as you can see below the integration is tight with the HTML5 client.

Finally, I wanted to highlight the new VMware Stack dashboard. This new visual component aims to very quickly prioritize what problem to solve and where it exists. The VMware stack contains 5 layers, Management, VM, Compute, Network and Storage. Runecast prioritizes and sorts all detected problems into those five categories so an admin can easily see where the critical issues are and what is the risk they pose.

Overall for those that have vSAN in their environments I would recommend a look at this release. The guys at Runecast are taking a unique approach to monitoring and I’m looking forward to future releases as they expand even more beyond vSphere and vSAN.

The latest version is available for a free 14-day trial.

Office 365 Backups and the Opportunity that Exists for Service Providers

In recent weeks i’ve become reacquainted with an old friend…There was a time where eighty to ninety percent of my day job was working in and around Exchange Server. If I had started this blog in 2005 it would have been dominated with posts around the Hosting of Exchange Server and probably be named Exchange is Life!. I take pride in my Hosted Exchange Org and User creation scripts that I created before Hosting Control Panels where even a thing.

Over the last five or six years my interest in Exchange diminished due to moving roles and also due to some lingering ill feelings about the way in which Microsoft treated their initial Hosting partners as they started what would become, Office 365 back in the late 2000’s. That said I have remained aware of the Exchange landscape and while there is still a lot of on-premises Exchange instances and still a number of decent Hosted Exchange providers out there, there is no stopping Office 365’s growth.

I even jumped on the bandwagon by moving my personal SliemaLabs domain over to an Office 365 Exchange subscription late last year. That domain initially lived on an Exchange Server I ran from home, and then on a Hosted Exchange platform I built and now it’s completed it’s own journey to Office 365.

Having spent a bit of time recently looking at the 1.5 version of our Backup for Microsoft Office 365 product…more specifically the new self service feature that came in Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 3. I’ve had a renewed sense of purpose around the Exchange ecosystem…and that purpose is to ensure that all service providers understand the opportunity that exists around creating offerings for the backing up and availability of Office365 services.

This post follows a post that was released on the blog by Paul Mattes (VP of Global Cloud Group at Veeam) talking about the success of our Backup for Microsoft Office 365 product.

In 2017, more than 25,000 organizations installed our Office 365 backup solution, representing 2.3 million Microsoft Office mailboxes. We saw a staggering 327% quarter-over-quarter growth in Q4 of last year.

And the reasons why all Office 365 users should consider an external backup solution for their data hosted in Microsoft’s SaaS cloud platform.

It’s important to remember that SaaS platform providers, like Microsoft Office 365, take on the responsibility of application uptime and the underlying infrastructure. But it is the customer’s responsibility to manage and protect their vital business data.

This is public cloud in a nutshell…Ultimately the customer has the responsibility to ensure all data is backed up correctly. I won’t go into the technical aspects as to why Office 365 requires additional backups solutions. There a plenty of good online resources, a Gartner report is available here Microsoft’s has an offical page on High Availability and Business Continuity guide. Doing research into the nature of SaaS you understand the need for third party backup solutions.

The Office 365 Opportunity:

From a service provider point of view there is an opportunity to tap into the 85 million user Exchange Online market and offer availability services for organisations using Office 365. This is a multi-billion dollar market that exists today and services based around backup and management of that data are central to tapping into that opportunity. Just breaking down the ANZ market alone, there are approximately 4.25 million Office 365 users of which if only 5% was captured would represent a combined 3.5 to 5 million dollar market.

For those VCSPs who have already deployed Cloud Connect and offering Backup services, the ground work has been laid with regards to having the infrastructure in place to extend that service to offer Veeam Backup for Office 365 aaS.

The billable components of this service are licenses and then storage costs. Managed Service Providers can also build in management fees that offer an end to end solution for their clients. Where it should be seen to be extremely attractive for VCPSs is in the potential for the storage revenue to be significant early and then continue to grow as tenant’s backup and retain more and more mailboxes in addition to new tenants coming on board.

We have given our VCSPs the tools to be able to build a strong service around Office 365 backups with the 1.5 release of Backup for Office 365 focused on scalability and automation. Add to that the self service feature that came in Update 3 for Backup & Replication and there is no excuse to not start thinking about offering this as a service.

Looking beyond Exchange Online, version 2 of Backup for Office 365 will include the ability to backup SharePoint and OneDrive as well…have a think about what that represents in terms of revenue opportunities just on the potential for storage consumption alone.

Again, I want to emphasis that this market is huge and what’s on offer in terms of potential revenue can’t be ignored. I’m excited about the next 12-18 months in being able to see our VCSPs grab this opportunity…don’t let it slip!


The Limitations of Microsoft Office 365 Backup



Insider Protection: Tenant Storage Usage and Cost Calculator

Last month I published a blog that looked deeper into the Insider Protection feature that was added as a feature to Veeam Cloud Connect as part of Update 3 for Backup & Replication 9.5. As a refresher, deleted backup protection…or Insider Protection allows the VCSP to enable the deleted backups protection option for specific tenants and looks to add another level of data security for cloud based backups in the case of a malicious user gaining access to the Backup & Replication Console or in the case of accidental deletion by an administrator.

It’s a great feature that every VCSPs offering Cloud Connect should be looking at to productise. That said, there a few things missing from this initial Update 3 release. One of those is that currently there is no way to pull metrics in relation to how much Recycle Bin storage tenant’s are consuming. This means the VCSP hasn’t got a way to account for or charge for storage usage. Ideally this would be retrieved via a PowerShell command-let or API call however at the moment there is no functionality.

As a workaround i’ve come up with a POC PowerShell script that lists all Cloud Connect tenant accounts with Backup Protection enabled and then works out the amount of storage in a the tenant’s _RecycleBin folder and returns that value as well as storage costs as it pertains to the service provider and what a tenant will be charged. The configured retention period is also listed.

There are a few caveats with this release that i’m looking to improve on (or have people fork and improve the code) over the next few weeks. The service provider storage costs are hard coded by default, but i’ve left a section commented out that will prompt for the two values if desired.

Hopefully this works as an example so that VCSPs can begin to offer Insider Protection as part of their Cloud Connect service offering. Having a workaround for cost calculations and reporting is not ideal, however the this feature will evolve in future releases of Backup & Replication. For the moment though, don’t this stop you from looking at Insider Protection for your clients.

vCloud Director Tenant UI: Dude…Where is my VM Web Console?

As most of you should know buy now, vCloud Director 9.0 features a new HTML5 Tenant UI Portal which is not only very pretty, but also functional. As of the 9.0 release the HTML5 Tenant UI has a limited scope of functionality compared to the legacy Flex based web console but is still a great example of where vCD is going in terms of continuing to enhance vCD.

I was having a discussion on Slack with Mark Ukotic talking about future vCD releases when he commented that he was looking forward to the Web Console coming to the HTML5 UI. To which I said “It was already there!” He replied saying “Really?” to which I replied…

On the Virtual Machines page, you can click on the VMware graphic which will open a Web Console window.

You won’t see the mouse change to indicate that the area is hot, which is why most people assume that the option to launch the Web Console isn’t there. But if you click on it, the Web Console window will pop up and you will be able to interact with the VM.

It is a very limited console in terms of remote actions you can perform. There is a lot more functionality in the VMware Remote Console…hopefully we will see that available to launch through the new Tennant UI in upcoming versions.

If the VM if powered off you will get the following message if you try to click on the image.

So there you have it! The Web Console is there in the new HTML5 Tenant UI in vCloud Director 9.0…it’s not super obvious, but it is there!


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