Tag Archives: VMWorld

vCloud Director is no more… Long Live vCD! [VMware Cloud Director Service for VMC]

There was a very significant announcement at VMworld Barcelona overnight, with the unveiling of a new service targeted at Managed Service Providers. VMware Cloud Director Service (CDS) looks to leverage a hosted SaaS based instance of vCloud Director to offer multi-tenancy on VMware Cloud on AWS. The VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC becomes the provider and MSPs can look to more efficiently consume VMC resources and expand as more capacity is required.

Daniel Paluszek has written a great overview blog post about what the service is, it’s key value points and some questions and answers that those in the VMware Cloud Provider Program may have. I’m personally looking forward to trying out the service myself and start looking at the data protection scenarios that can be supported.

They Said it Would Never Happen:

Back in 2016 when VMware first announced VMware Cloud on AWS, I saw the potential straight away and what it could mean for (at the time vCloud Air) VMware Cloud Provider Partners to extend their Provider vDCs to one that was backed by VMC.

At the time I hacked together what I saw to be the future.

This isn’t quite what this newly announced solution is and it will be interesting to see if VMware eventually allow SP based vCD installs to go out and source a VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC as a Provider of its own. I was told by a number of people that vCD would never be used with VMC…

Further improving on vCloud Directors maturity and extensibility, if the much maligned UI is improved as promised…with the upcoming addition of full NSX integration completing the network stack, the next step in greater adoption beyond the 300 odd vCAN SPs currently use vCloud Director needs a hook…and that hook should be VMWonAWS.

Time will tell…but there is huge potential here. VMware need to deliver to their partners in order to have that VMWonAWS potential realised.

That said, vCloud Director has evolved tremendously since then and delivered on almost everything that I was after at the time. This seems to be the last piece of the puzzle … though given that the actual Cloud Direct Service is delivered aaS does have me worried a little bit in terms of the ghosts of vCloud Air past.

Targeting MSPs over SPs:

I’ve already had some conversations as to who this new Cloud Director SaaS offering might be targeting. While I need to find out more information, it seems as though the main target of the service initially are MSPs. Depending on where you come from the definition of an MSP will differ to that of an SP. In some regions they are one and the same, however in the North American market an MSP would leverage an SP to offer infrastructure or software as a service.

Which every way you look at it, there is now the ability to spin up an instance of vCD that is managed and have that abstract resources that are in VMware Cloud on AWS. In a way this may lead some MSPs to ditch existing reseller relationships with existing VCPPs offering IaaS with vCD and go direct to VMware to have an end to end managed multi-tenant service and a direct reseller agreement with VMware.

Again, I need some more information before passing judgement and seeing how this fits into existing VCPP service offerings. Obviously the ability for existing VCPPs to land and expand into any VMC enabled AWS Region with this new service is significant also… but will they be able to use their existing provisioning and automation tools with the new service… and will the SaaS based version of Cloud Director be first to market with new features, followed by the VCPP versions?

Dropping the little v:

When VMware acquired Lab Manager and turned it into vCloud Director in 2010 it was hard to envision that the platform would still be going strong nearly ten years later. It’s now stronger that ever and set to go through its next evolution with the platform looking to extend beyond traditional vSphere IaaS based platforms… this explains why the little v has been dropped. We are not just talking about vCloud anymore… The premise is that Cloud Director will span multiple cloud and multiple platforms.

Be interesting to see when the name change takes place for the main product line that’s offered to VMware Cloud Providers… for the time being, it will still be vCD to me!

#LongLivevCD
#VCDpowered

References:

https://cloudsolutions.vmware.com/bite-sized-vmc

VMware Cloud Director – A New Day.

The Separation of Dev and Ops is Upon Us!

Apart from the K word, there was one other enduring message that I think a lot of people took home from VMworld 2019. That is, that Dev and Ops should be considered as seperate entities again. For the best part of the last five or so years the concept of DevOps, SecOps and other X-Ops has been perpetuated mainly due to the rise of consumable platforms outside the traditional control of IT operations people.

The pressure to DevOp has become very real in the IT communities that I am involved with. These circles are mainly made up of traditional infrastructure guys. I’ve written a few pieces around how the industry trend to try turn everyone into developers isn’t one that needs to be followed. Automation doesn’t equal development and there are a number of Infrastructure as Code tools that looks to bridge the gap between the developer and the infrastructure guy.

That isn’t to say that traditional IT guys shouldn’t be looking to push themselves to learn new things and improve and evolve. In fact, IT Ops needs to be able to code in slightly abstracted ways to work with APIs or leverage IaC tooling. However my view is that IT Ops number one role is to understand fundamentally what is happening within a platform, and be able to support infrastructure that developers can consume.

I had a bit of an aha moment this week while working on some Kubernetes (that word again!) automation work with Terraform which I’ll release later this week. The moment was when I was trying to get the Sock Shop demo working on my fresh Kubernetes cluster. I finally understood why Kubernetes had been created. Everything about the application was defined in the json files and deployed as is holistically through one command. It’s actually rather elegant compared to how I worked with developers back in the early days of web hosting on Windows and Linux web servers with their database backends and whatnot.

Regardless of the ease of deployment, I still had to understand the underlying networking and get the application to listen on external IPs and different ports. At this point I was doing dev and doing IT Ops in one. However this is all contained within my lab environment that has no bearing on the availability of the application, security or otherwise. This is where separation is required.

For developers, they want to consume services and take advantages of the constructs of a containerised platform like Docker paired together with the orchestrations and management of those resources that Kubernetes provides. They don’t care what’s under the hood and shouldn’t be concerned what their application runs on.

For IT Operations they want to be able to manage the supporting platforms as they did previously. The compute, the networking the storage… this is all still relevant in a hybrid world. They should absolutely still care about what’s under the hood and the impact applications can have to infrastructure.

VMware has introduced that (re)split of dev and ops with the introduction of Project Pacific and I applaude them for going against the grain and endorsing the separation of roles and responsibilities. Kubernetes and ESXi in one vSphere platform is where that vision lies. Outside of vSphere, it is still very true that devs can consume public clouds without a care about underlying infrastructure… but for me… it all comes back down to this…

Let devs be devs… and let IT Ops be IT Ops! They need to work together in this hybrid, multi-cloud world!

VMworld 2019 Veeam Wrap Up – Supportability Announcements and Session Recaps

VMworld 2019 is almost a distant memory, and with the focus now shifting to VMworld Europe happening later in the year I wanted to round out the US event with a wrap up of Veeam happenings at the event. It was a busy week for myself at the event which is representative of how much Veeam invests into the event to retain mindshare and also to support the community. I was able to attend a number of community events in between daily recap videos, partner meetings and official Veeam gatherings. The week as usual, was extremely rewarding.

My earlier post on Project Pacific has been well read this week, showing me that VMware’s move to integrate Kubernetes into vSphere has resonated with IT Pros. While from a Veeam product point of view we were able to publicly demo for the first time our long awaited CDP feature in the session I gave with Danny Allan along with a couple new features coming in v10, while Michael Cade and David Hill took people through Veeam’s portable data format which gives us simplicity, reliability and flexibility

Announcements:

Veeam announced some important supportability milestones around the event:

  • vCloud Director 9.7 support and validation – With Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4b we retain existing support for vCloud Director 9.7. Visit the Veeam KB article to learn more about this and other topics.
  • vSAN 6.7 Update 2 certification – Veeam has successfully passed the vSAN 6.7 Update 2 certification. See the VMware Compatibility Guide for details.
  • vSphere 6.5 Update 3 now supported – Veeam officially supports this release. All documentation and release notes have been updated to reflect this.
  • Veeam continues to support VMware Cloud on AWS – SDDC 1.8 is supported and Veeam is officially certified. See the Veeam KB for more info.
  • NSX‑T Support – Customers can now receive a patch from support to make Veeam Backup & Replication v9.5 Update 4b compatible. This will be integrated into the upcoming v10. See the Veeam KB for more info.
Breakout Sessions and Techtalks:

Beyond the supportability, there where a number of Veeam related sessions at the event including two breakouts and a number of vBrownBag Tech Talks. The breakouts are gated this year, but all you need to do to view the sessions online is register for a VMworld account

Backups are just the start! Enhanced Data Mobility with Veeam (HBI3535BUS)

Enhancing Data Protection for vSphere with What’s Coming from Veeam (HBI3532BUS)

We also had a number of Veeam flavoured vBrownBag TechTalks… they have been embedded below.

VMworld 2019 Review – Project Pacific is a Stroke of Kubernetes Genius… but not without a catch!

Kubernetes Kubernetes, Kubernetes… say Kubernetes one more time… I dare you!

If it wasn’t clear what the key take away from VMworld 2019 was last week in San Francisco then I’ll repeat it one more time… Kubernetes! It was something which I predicted prior to the event in my session breakdown. And all jokes aside, with the amount of times we heard Kubernetes mentioned last week, we know that VMware signalled their intent to jump on the Kubernetes freight train and ride it all the way.

When you think about it, the announcement of Project Pacific isn’t a surprise. Apart from it being an obvious path to take to ensure VMware remains viable with IT Operations (IT Ops) and Developers (Devs) holistically, the more I learned about what it actually does under the hood, the more I came to belief that it is a stroke of genius. If it delivers technically on the its promise of full ESX and Kubernetes integration into the one vSphere platform, then it will be a huge success.

The whole premise of Project Pacific is to use Kubernetes to manage workloads via declarative specifications. Essentially allowing IT Ops and Devs to tell vSphere what they want and have it deploy and manage the infrastructure that ultimately serves as a platform for an application. This is all about the application! Abstracting all infrastructure and most of the platform to make the application work. We are now looking at a platform platform that controls all aspects of that lifecycle end to end.

By redesigning vSphere and implanting Kubernetes into the core of vSphere, VMware are able to take advantage of the things that make Kubernetes popular in todays cloud native world. A Kubernetes Namespace is effectively a tenancy in Kubernetes that will manage applications holistically and it’s at the namespace level where policies are applied. QoS, Security, Availability, Storage, Networking, Access Controls can all be applied top down from the Namespace. This gives IT Ops control, while still allowing devs to be agile.

I see this construct similar to what vCloud Director offers by way of a Virtual Datacenter with vApps used as the container for the VM workloads… in truth, the way in which vCD abstracted vSphere resources into tenancies and have policies applied was maybe ahead of it’s time?

DevOps Seperation:

DevOps has been a push for the last few years in our industry and the pressure to be a DevOp is huge. The reality of that is that both sets of disciplines have fundamentally different approaches to each others lines of work. This is why it was great to see VMware going out of their way to make the distinction between IT Ops and Devs.

Dev and IT Ops collaboration is paramount in todays IT world and with Project Pacific, when a Dev looks at the vSphere platform they see Kubernetes. When an IT Ops guy looks at vSphere he still sees vSphere and ESXi. This allows for integrated self service and allows more speed with control to deploy and manage the infrastructure and platforms the run applications.

Consuming Virtual Machines as Containers and Extensibility:

Kubernetes was described as a Platform Platform… meaning that you can run almost anything in Kubernetes as long as its declared. The above image shows a holistic application running in Project Pacific. The application is a mix of Kubernetes containers, VMs and other declared pieces… all of which can be controlled through vSphere and lives under that single Namespace.

When you log into the vSphere Console you can see a Kubernetes Cluster in vSphere and see the PODs and action on them as first class citizens. vSphere Native PODs are an optimized run time… apparently more optimized than baremetal… 8% faster than baremetal as we saw in the keynote on Monday. The way in which this is achieved is due to CPU virtualization having almost zero cost today. VMware has taken advantage of the advanced ESXi scheduler of which vSphere/ESXi have advanced operations across NUMA nodes along with the ability to strip out what is not needed when running containers on VMs so that there is optimal runtime for workloads.

vSphere will have two APIs with Project Pacific. The traditional vSphere API that has been refined over the years will remain and then, there will be the Kubernetes API. There is also be ability to create infrastructure with kubectl. Each ESXi Cluster becomes a Kubernetes cluster. The work done with vSphere Integrated Containers has not gone to waste and has been used in this new integrated platform.

PODs and VMs live side by side and declared through Kubernetes running in Kubernetes. All VMs can be stored in the container registry. Critical Venerability scans, encryption, signing can be leveraged at a container level that exist in the container ecosystem and applied to VMs.

There is obviously a lot more to Project Pacific, and there is a great presentation up on YouTube from Tech Field Day Extra at VMworld 2019 which I have embedded below. In my opinion, they are a must for all working in and around the VMware ecosystem.

The Catch!

So what is the catch? With 70 million workloads across 500,000+ customers VMware is thinking that with this functionality in place the current movement of refactoring of workloads to take advantage of cloud native constructs like containers, serverless or Kubernetes doesn’t need to happen… those, and existing workloads instantly become first class citizens on Kubernetes. Interesting theory.

Having been digging into the complex and very broad container world for a while now, and only just realising how far on it has become in terms of it being high on most IT agendas my currently belief is that the world of Kubernetes and containers is better placed to be consumed on public clouds. The scale and immediacy of Kubernetes platforms on Google, Azure or AWS without the need to ultimately still procure hardware and install software means that that model of consumption will still have an advantage over something like Project Pacific.

The one stroke of genius as mentioned is that by combining “traditional” workloads with Kubernetes as its control plane within vSphere the single, declarative, self service experience that it potentially offers might stop IT Operations from moving to public clouds… but is that enough to stop the developers forcing their hands?

It is going to be very interesting to see this in action and how well it is ultimately received!

More on Project Pacific

The videos below give a good level of technical background into Project Pacific, while Frank also has a good introductory post here, while Kit Colbert’s VMworld session is linked in the references.

References:

https://videos.vmworld.com/global/2019/videoplayer/28407

VMworld 2019 – Top Session Picks

VMworld 2019 is happening tomorrow (It is already Saturday here) and as I am just about to embark on the 20+ hour journey from PER to SFO I thought it was better late than never to share my top session picks. Now with sessions available online it doesn’t really matter that the actual sessions are fully booked. The theme this year is “Make Your Mark” …which does fall in line with themes of past VMworld events. It’s all about VMware empowering it’s customers to do great things with its technology.

I’ve already given a session breakdown and analysis for this years event… and as a recap here are some of the keyword numbers relating to what tech is in what session.

Out of all that, and the 1348 sessions total, that are currently in the catalog I have chosen then list below as my top session picks.

  • vSphere HA and DRS Hybrid Cloud Deep Dive [HBI2186BU]
  • 60 Minutes of Non-Uniform Memory Architecture [HBI2278BU]
  • vCloud Director.Next : Deliver Cloud Services on Any VMware Endpoint [HBI2452BU]
  • Why Cloud Providers Choose VMware vCloud Director as Their Cloud Platform [HBI1453PU]
  • VMware Cloud on AWS: Advanced Automation Techniques [HBI1463BU]
  • The Future of vSphere: What you Need to Know [HBI4937BU]
  • NSX-T for Service Providers [MTE6105U]
  • Kubernetes Networking with NSX-T [MTE6104U]
  • vSAN Best Practices [HCI3450BU]
  • Deconstructing vSAN: A Deep Dive into the internals of vSAN [HCI1342BU]
  • VMware in Any Cloud: Introducing Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud VMware Solutions [HBI4446BU]

Also wanted to again call out the Veeam Sessions.

  • Backups are just the start! Enhanced Data Mobility with Veeam [HBI3535BUS]
  • Enhancing Data Protection for vSphere with What’s Coming from Veeam [HBI3532BUS]

A lot of those sessions above relate to my ongoing interest in the service providers world and my continued passion in vCloud Director, NSX and vSAN as core VMware technologies. I also think the first two I put in the list are important because in this day of instant (gratification) services we still need to be mindful of what is happening underneath the surface…. it’s not just a case of some computer running some workload somewhere!

All in all it should be a great week in SFO and looking forward to the event… now to finish packing and get to the airport!

Veeam @VMworld 2019 Edition…

VMworld 2019 is now only a couple of days away, and I can’t wait to return to San Francisco for what will be my seventh VMworld and third one with Veeam. It has again been an interesting year since the last VMworld and the industry has shifted a little when it comes to the backup and recovery market. Data management and data analytics have become the new hot topic item and lots of vendors have jumped onto the messaging of data growth at more than exponential rates.

VMware still have a lot to say about where and how that data is processed and stored!

VMworld is still a destination event and Veeam recognises VMware’s continued influence in the IT industry by continuing to support VMworld. The ecosystem that VMware has built over the past ten to fifteen years is significant and has only been strengthened by the extension of their technologies to the public cloud.

Veeam continues to build out own own strong ecosystem backed by a software first, hardware agnostic platform which results in the greatest flexibility in the backup and recovery market. We continue to support VMware as our number 1 technology partner and this year we look to build on that with support for VMware Cloud on AWS and enhanced VMware features sets built into our core Backup & Replication product as we look to release v10 later in the year.

Veeam Sessions @VMworld:

Officially we have two breakout sessions this year, with Danny Allan and myself presenting a What’s Coming from Veeam featuring our long awaited CDP feature (#HBI3532BUS), and Michael Cade and David Hill presenting a around how Backups are just the start… with a look at how we offer Simplicity, Reliability and Portability as core differentiators (#HBI3535BUS).

There are also four vBrownBag Tech Talks where Veeam features including talks from Michael Cade, Tim Smith, Joe Hughes and myself. While we are also doing a couple of partner lunch events focused on Cloud and Datacenter Transformation.

https://my.vmworld.com/widget/vmware/vmworld19us/us19catalog?search=Veeam

Veeam @VMworld Solutions Exchange:

This year, as per usual we will have significant presence on the floor as main sponsor of the Welcome Reception, with our Booth (#627) Area featuring demo’s prize, giveaways, as well as having an Experts Bar. There will be a number of Booth presentations throughout the event.

Veeam Community Support @VMworld:

Veeam still gets the community and has been a strong supporter historically of VMworld community based events. This year again, we have come to the party are have gone all-in in terms of being front and center in supporting community events. Special mention goes to Rick Vanover who leads the charge in making sure Veeam is doing what it can to help make these events possible:

  • Opening Acts
  • VMunderground
  • vBrownBag
  • Spousetivities
  • vRockstar Party
  • LevelUp Career Cafe

Party with Veeam @VMworld:

Finally, it wouldn’t be VMworld without attending Veeam’s legendary party. While we are not in Vegas this year and can’t hold it at a super club, we have managed to book one of the best places in San Francisco… The Masonic. We have Andy Grammer performing and while it won’t be a Vegas style Veeam event… it is already sold out maxed at 2000 people so we know it’s going to be a success and will be one of the best parties of 2019!

While it’s officially sold out ticket wise, if people do want to attend we are suggesting they come to the venue in any case as there are sure to be no shows.

Final Word:

Again, this year’s VMworld is going to be huge and Veeam will be right there front and center of the awesomeness. Please stop by our sessions, visit our stand and attend our community sponsored events and feel free to chase me down for a chat…I’m always keen to meet other members of this great community. Oh, and don’t forget to get to the party!

VMworld 2019 – Session Breakdown and Analysis

Everything to do with VMworld this year feels like it’s arrived at lightning speed. I actually thought the event was two weeks away as the start of the week… but here we are… only five days away from kicking off in San Francisco. The content catalog for the US event has been live for a while now and as is recently the case, a lot of sessions were full just hours after it went live! At the moment there is huge 1348 sessions listed which include the #vBrownBag Tech Talks hosted by the VMTN Community.

As I do every year I like to filter through the content catalog and work out what technologies are getting the airplay at the event. It’s interesting going back since I first started doing this to see the catalog evolve with the times… certain topics have faded away while others have grown and some dominate. This ebs and flows with VMware’s strategies and makes for interesting comparison.

What first struck me as being interesting was the track names compared to just two years ago at the 2017 event:

I see less buzz words and more tracks that are tech specific. Yes, within those sub categories we have the usual elements of “digital transformation” and “disruption”, however VMware’s focus looks to be focuses more around the application of technology and not the high level messaging that usually plagues tech conferences. VMworld has for the most and remains a technical conference for techs.

By digging into the sessions by searching on key words alone, the list below shows you where most of the sessions are being targeted this year. If, in 2015 you where to take a guess at what particular technology was having the most coverage at a VMworld at 2019…the list below would be much different than what we see this year.

From looking back over previous years, there is a clear rise in the Containers world which is now dominated by Kubernetes. Thinking back to previous VMworld’s, you would never get the big public cloud providers with airtime. If you look at how that has changed for this year we now have 231 sessions alone that mention AWS… not to mention the ones mentioning Azure or Google.

Strategy wise it’s clear that NSX, VMC and Kubernetes are front of mind for VMware and their ecosystem partners.

I take this as an indication as to where the industry is… and is heading. VMware are still the main touch point for those that work in and around IT Infrastructure support and services. They own the ecosystem still… and even with the rise of AWS, Azure, GCP and alike, they still are working out ways to hook those platforms into their own technology and are moving with industry trends as to where workloads are being provisioned. Kubernetes and VMware Cloud on AWS are a big part of that, but underpinning it is the network… and NSX is still heavily represented with NSX-T becoming even more prominent.

One area that continues to warm my heart is the continued growth and support shown to the VMware Cloud Providers and vCloud Director. The numbers are well up from the dark days of vCD around the 2013 and 2014 VMworld’s. For anyone working on cloud technologies this year promises to be a bumper year for content and i’m looking forward to catching as much vCD and VCPP related sessions as I can.

It promises to be an interesting VMworld, with VMware hinting at a massive shift in direction… I think we all know in a round about way where that is heading… let’s see if we are right come next week.

https://my.vmworld.com/widget/vmware/vmworld19us/us19catalog

VMworld 2019 – Still Time To Go for FREE*!

VMworld is rapidly approaching, and for those that have not secured their place at the event in San Francisco, and for whatever reason have been hindered in terms of purchasing an event ticket… there is still time and there is still a way!

We (Veeam) have been running a competition that gives away three FULL conference pass over the course of the last few months but ends on the 19th of August so time is running out!

Head here to register for the chance to win a FULL conference pass.

For a quick summary of what is happening at VMworld from a Veeam perspective including sessions, parties and more, click here to head to the main event page that contains details on what Veeam is doing at VMworld 2019.

*The Prize does not include any associated costs including but not limited to expenses, insurance, travel, food or additional accommodation costs unless otherwise specified above.

Veeam on the VMware Cloud Marketplace Protecting VMware Cloud on AWS Workloads

At VMworld 2018, myself and Michael Cade gave a session on automating and orchestrating Veeam on VMware Cloud on AWS. The premise of the session was to showcase the art of the possible with Veeam and VMware that resulted in a fully deployed and configured Veeam platform. We chose VMware Cloud on AWS for the demo to showcase the power of the Software Defined Datacenter with Veeam, however our solution can be deployed onto any vSphere platform.

Why Veeam with VMware Cloud on AWS:

I’ve have spent a lot of time over the past couple of months looking into VMware Cloud on AWS and working out just where Veeam fits in terms of a backup and recovery solution for it. I’ve also spent time talking to VMware sales people as well as solution providers looking to wrap managed services around VMC and the question of data protection is often raised as a key concern. There is a good article here that talks about the need for backup and how application HA or stretched clustering is not a suitable alternative.

Without prejudice, I truly believe that Veeam is the best solution for the backup and recovery of workloads hosted on VMware Cloud on AWS SDDCs. Not only do we offer a solution that’s 100% software defines it’s self, but we can extend protection of all workloads from on-premises, through to the SDDC and also natively in AWS covering both backup, replication as well as offering the ability to use Cloud Connect to backup out to a Veeam Cloud and Service Provider. I’ll go into this in greater detail in a future post.

Veeam on the VMware Cloud on AWS Marketplace:

At the same time as our session on the Monday there was another session that introduced the VMware Cloud Marketplace that was announced in Technical Preview. As part of that launch, Veeam was announced as an initial software partner. This allows for the automated deployment and configuration of a Veeam Backup & Replication instance directly into a deployed SDDC and also configures an AWS EC2 EBS backed instance to be used as a Veeam Repository.

The VMware Cloud Marketplace will offer the ability to browse and filter validated third-party products and solutions, view technical and operational details, facilitate Bring Your Own License (BYOL) deployments, support commercial transactions, and deliver unified invoices. We plan to open Cloud Marketplace to a limited Beta audience following VMworld and are working on additional features and capabilities for future releases. We envision the Cloud Marketplace will quickly expand, introducing new third-party vendors and products over time and becoming the de-facto source for customers to extend the capabilities of VMware Cloud on AWS and VMware Cloud Provider Partner environments.

Compared to what Michael and I showcased in our session, this is a more targeted vanilla deployment of Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 with Update 3a into the SDDC. At the end of the process, you will be able to access the Veeam Console, have it connected to the VMC vSphere endpoint and have the EC2 Veeam repository added.

This is done via CloudFormation templates and a little bit of PowerShell embedded into the Windows Image.

Being embedded directly into the VMware Cloud Marketplace is advantageous for customers looking to get started quick with their data protection for workloads running on VMware Cloud o AWs. Look out for more collateral from myself, Veeam and VMware on protecting VMC with Veeam as well as a deeper look at our VMworld session which digs into the automation and orchestration of Veeam on VMware Cloud on AWS using Chef, Terraform, PowerShell and PowerCLI.

References:

Introducing VMware Cloud Marketplace

https://cloud.vmware.com/cloud-marketplace

https://marketplace.vmware.com/vsx/solutions/veeam-availability-suite-for-vmware-cloud-on-aws-9-5?ref=search#summary

VMworld 2018 Recap Part 2 – Community and Veeam Recap

VMworld 2018 has come and gone and after a couple of days recovery from the week that was, i’ve had time to reflect on what was a great week and an another great VMworld in Las Vegas. For me, the dynamic of what it is to be at a VMworld has changed. The week is not just about the event, the announcements or the sessions…but more about what myself and my team are able to achieve. While we are participants of VMworld we are also working and need to be adding value on all fronts.

This year I left Las Vegas with a sense of achievement and the belief that the week was extremely successful both personally and from a Veeam Product Strategy point of view. In this post (which is Part 2 of my VMworld 2018 recap) I am going to go over what went down with the VMware community during the event and close off with a quick Veeam roundup.

Community:

I felt like the community spirit was in full effect again at VMworld. Between all the sessions, parties and events my overall feeling was that there was a lot of community activity going on. Twitter it’s self came to life and everyones timelines where filling up with #VMworld media. The grass roots community still fuels a lot of VMware’s success and you can’t underestimate the value of influence and advocacy at this level. Certainly, Veeam and other vendors understand this and cater to supporting community events while looking after members with vendor branded swag.

One important thing I would like to highlight is the power of the local community and how something small can turn into something huge. My good friend from Australia, Tim Carman had an idea last year to create an As Built PowerShell Documentation script. He first presented it at his local VMUG…then a few months later he presented it at the Melbourne VMUG UserCon and last week, he presented it with Matt Allford in front of 500 plus people at VMworld. Not only that, but the session was voted into the daily top ten and is currently the second most downloaded via the online session download page!

Hackathon:

Another amazing thing that happened at VMworld was the team that I was lucky enough to be a member of took out the Hackathon. Aussie vMafia 2.0, lead by Mark Ukotic took out the main prize on the back of an idea to put a terminal in the (H5) Client and running commands. Again, what I was most pleased about with Mark, Tim and Matt’s success was exposure from the sessions and Hackathon win. They are great guys and well deserving of it. It goes down as one of my best VMworld highlights of all time!

Veeam Highlights and Sessions:

Finally to wrap things up, it was a great VMworld for Veeam. I spoke to a lot of customers and partners and it’s clear that our Availability Platform that’s driven through our strong ecosystem alliances is still very much resonating and seen to be leading the industry. Being hardware agnostic and software only carries massive weight and it was pleasing to have that validated by talking to customer and partners during the course of the event.

In terms of our sessions, we had two different breakouts. One covering some of the brilliant new features in Update 4 of Backup & Replication 9.5 presented by Danny Allan and Rick Vanover.

And myself and Michael Cade presented on automation and orchestration of Veeam on VMware Cloud on AWS. Michael talks about the session here, but in a nutshell we came up with a workflow that orchestrates the deployment of a Veeam Backup & Replication Server with Proxies onto a vSphere environment (VMC used in this case to highlight the power of the SDDC) and then deploys and configures a Veeam Linux Repository in AWS, hooks that into a VeeamPN extended network and then configures the Veeam Server ready to backup VMs.

Finally…it wouldn’t be VMworld without a Veeam party, and this year didn’t fail to live up to expectation. Held at the Omnia nightclub on Tuesday night it was well received and we managed to fill the club without the need to pull in a headline act. And as I tweeted out…

Wrap Up:

Overall, VMworld ticked a lot of boxes and was well received by everyone that I came across. IT’s been a good run of three VMworld’s in a row in Vegas, however it’s time to move back to where it all started for me in 2012 in San Fransisco. It’s going to be interesting going back to the Mascone Center and a city that hasn’t got the best reputation at the present moment due to social issues and the cost of accomodation is astronomical compared to Vegas. However, location is one thing…it’s what VMware and it’s ecosystem partners bring to the event. This year it worked! Hopefully next year will be just as successful.

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