Tag Archives: vCloud

vCloud Director is no more… Long Live vCD! [VMware Cloud Director Service for VMC]

There was a very significant announcement at VMworld Barcelona overnight, with the unveiling of a new service targeted at Managed Service Providers. VMware Cloud Director Service (CDS) looks to leverage a hosted SaaS based instance of vCloud Director to offer multi-tenancy on VMware Cloud on AWS. The VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC becomes the provider and MSPs can look to more efficiently consume VMC resources and expand as more capacity is required.

Daniel Paluszek has written a great overview blog post about what the service is, it’s key value points and some questions and answers that those in the VMware Cloud Provider Program may have. I’m personally looking forward to trying out the service myself and start looking at the data protection scenarios that can be supported.

They Said it Would Never Happen:

Back in 2016 when VMware first announced VMware Cloud on AWS, I saw the potential straight away and what it could mean for (at the time vCloud Air) VMware Cloud Provider Partners to extend their Provider vDCs to one that was backed by VMC.

At the time I hacked together what I saw to be the future.

This isn’t quite what this newly announced solution is and it will be interesting to see if VMware eventually allow SP based vCD installs to go out and source a VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC as a Provider of its own. I was told by a number of people that vCD would never be used with VMC…

Further improving on vCloud Directors maturity and extensibility, if the much maligned UI is improved as promised…with the upcoming addition of full NSX integration completing the network stack, the next step in greater adoption beyond the 300 odd vCAN SPs currently use vCloud Director needs a hook…and that hook should be VMWonAWS.

Time will tell…but there is huge potential here. VMware need to deliver to their partners in order to have that VMWonAWS potential realised.

That said, vCloud Director has evolved tremendously since then and delivered on almost everything that I was after at the time. This seems to be the last piece of the puzzle … though given that the actual Cloud Direct Service is delivered aaS does have me worried a little bit in terms of the ghosts of vCloud Air past.

Targeting MSPs over SPs:

I’ve already had some conversations as to who this new Cloud Director SaaS offering might be targeting. While I need to find out more information, it seems as though the main target of the service initially are MSPs. Depending on where you come from the definition of an MSP will differ to that of an SP. In some regions they are one and the same, however in the North American market an MSP would leverage an SP to offer infrastructure or software as a service.

Which every way you look at it, there is now the ability to spin up an instance of vCD that is managed and have that abstract resources that are in VMware Cloud on AWS. In a way this may lead some MSPs to ditch existing reseller relationships with existing VCPPs offering IaaS with vCD and go direct to VMware to have an end to end managed multi-tenant service and a direct reseller agreement with VMware.

Again, I need some more information before passing judgement and seeing how this fits into existing VCPP service offerings. Obviously the ability for existing VCPPs to land and expand into any VMC enabled AWS Region with this new service is significant also… but will they be able to use their existing provisioning and automation tools with the new service… and will the SaaS based version of Cloud Director be first to market with new features, followed by the VCPP versions?

Dropping the little v:

When VMware acquired Lab Manager and turned it into vCloud Director in 2010 it was hard to envision that the platform would still be going strong nearly ten years later. It’s now stronger that ever and set to go through its next evolution with the platform looking to extend beyond traditional vSphere IaaS based platforms… this explains why the little v has been dropped. We are not just talking about vCloud anymore… The premise is that Cloud Director will span multiple cloud and multiple platforms.

Be interesting to see when the name change takes place for the main product line that’s offered to VMware Cloud Providers… for the time being, it will still be vCD to me!

#LongLivevCD
#VCDpowered

References:

https://cloudsolutions.vmware.com/bite-sized-vmc

VMware Cloud Director – A New Day.

Mapping vCloud Director Backup Jobs to Self Service Portal Tenants

Since version 7 of Backup & Replication, Veeam has lead the way in regard to the protection of workloads running in vCloud Director. With version 7 Veeam first released deep integration into vCD that talked directly to the vCD APIs to facilitate the backup and recovery of vCD workloads and their constructs. More recently in version 9.5, the vCD Self Service Portal was released which also taps into vCD for tenant authentication.

The portal leverages Enterprise Manager and allows service providers to grant their tenants self-service backup for their vCD workloads. More recently we have seen some VCSPs integrate the portal into the new vCD UI via the extensibility plugin which is a great example of the power that Veeam has with vCD today while we wait for deeper, native integration.

It’s possible that some providers don’t even know that this portal exists let alone the value it offers. I’ve covered the basics of the portal here…but in this post, I am going to quickly mention an extension to a project I released last year for the vCD Self Service Portal, that automatically enables a tenant, creates a default backup jobs based on policies, tie backup copy jobs to default job for longer retention and finally import the jobs into the vCD Self Service Portal ready for use.

Standalone Map and Unmap PowerShell Script:

From the above project, the job import part has been expanded to include its own standalone PowerShell script that can also be used to map or unmap existing vCD Veeam Backup jobs to a a tenant to manage from the vCD Self Service Portal. This is done using the Set-VBRvCloudOrganizationJobMapping commandlet.

As shown below, this tenant has already configured a number of jobs in the Portal.

There was another historical job that was created outside of the portal directly from the Veeam console. Seen below as TEST IMPORT.

To map the job, run the PowerShell script is with the -map parameter. A list of all existing vCloud Director Backup jobs will be listed. Once the corresponding number has been entered the commandlet within the script will be run and the job mapped to the tenant linked to the job.

Once that has been run, the tenant now has that job listed in the vCD Self Service Portal.

There is a little bit of error checking built into the script, to that it exits nicely on an exception as shown below.

Finally, if you want to unmap a job from the vCD Self Service portal, run the PowerShell script with the -unmap parameter. Conclusion:

Like most things I work on and then publish for general consumption, I had a request to wrap some logic around the Set-VBRvCloudOrganizationJobMapping commandlet from a service provider partner. The script can be taken and improved, but as-is, provides an easy way to retrieve all vCloud Jobs belonging to a Veeam Server, select the desired job and then have it mapped to a tenant using the vCD Self Service Portal.

References:

https://github.com/anthonyspiteri/powershell/blob/master/vCD-Create-SelfServiceTenantandPolicyJobs/vCD_job.ps1

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/powershell/set-vbrvcloudorganizationjobmapping.html?ver=95u4

Quick Fix: Upgrading to vCloud Director 9.7 fails During Database Script Updates

While looking to upgrade one of my vCloud Director instances I came across an error during the database upgrade process which is the second step of updating vCloud Director from version to version. I must admit, it the eight to nine years of using vCloud Director, this was the first time that had an error during this process… I was kind of shocked!

Unable to upgrade the database: java.lang.IllegalStateException: Exception encountered while altering idle transaction session timeout in vcloud database:

This was upgrading a PostGreSQL 9.5 database in a single cell all in one setup. Initially I was going from 9.1.x to 9.7 so I decided to roll back and try a 9.5 upgrade first. That worked without issue, however the subsequent upgrade from 9.5 to 9.7 also failed with the same error. Talking in the VMware Cloud Provider Slack Channel I got a few pointers to permissions and/or the version of PostGreSQL being not supported by 9.7.

Looking at the supportability Matrix for vCloud Director against supported databases we see:

vCloud Director 9.7 only supports MSSQL 2017 (last release that will support MSSQL) and PostGreSQL 10 which suggests 10.x. I was running PostGreSQL 9.5, so decided to upgrade to 10.7 using this guide from Yves Sandfort.

After upgrading to 10.7 I tried the upgrade again but still got the same error. Because of the fact that the same instance upgraded successfully from 9.1 to 9.5 I didn’t really consider the database permissions to be a problem so continued to investigate with the help of VMware Support. What we found was an exception that mentioned ownership of the vcloud database from the current user which is vcloud.

Sure enough, logging into PostgreSQL admin it showed that the existing owner of the vcloud database was postgreS its self.

Strangely for me, during the PostgreSQL upgrade and migration the ownership of the database did not carry across. After changing the ownership back to the vcloud user the upgrade worked.

Take Away:

There seems to be two potential triggers for the error during the database upgrade:

  • Being on a non supported version of PostgreSQL (not 10x)
  • Not having the correct ownership permissions against the vcloud database

So if that error pops up during an upgrade to vCloud Director 9.7 check either of the above (or both) and give it another shot.

Update 4 for Service Providers – Targeting vCloud Director with Cloud Connect Replication

When Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4 went Generally Available in late January I posted a What’s in it for Service Providers blog. In that post I briefly outlined all the new features and enhancements in Update 4 as it related to our Veeam Cloud and Service Providers. As mentioned each new major feature deserves it’s own seperate post. I’ve covered off the majority of the new feature so far, and for the final post in the series I am looking at something that is close to my heart…vCloud Director Support for Veeam Cloud Connect Replication.

As a reminder here are the top new features and enhancements in Update 4 for VCSPs.

Leveraging the Best of vCloud Director for Stronger DRaaS:

VMware vCloud Director is the de facto standard for service providers who offer Infrastructure as a Service based on VMware and Veeam has had a long history supporting vCloud Director, with the industry’s first support for vCloud Director aware backups released in Veeam Backup & Replication v7 following on with the first stand alone Self Service Backup Portal in v9.5.

With the release of Update 4, we have added support for Veeam Cloud Connect to replicate directly into vCloud Director virtual datacenters, allowing both our Cloud and Service Provider Partners (VCSP) and customers to take advantage of the enhancements VMware has built into the platform. While this has been a long time coming, this support represents a significant enhancement to the way in which our VCSPs offer DRaaS.

With tenants consuming vCloud Director resources, it allows them to take advantage of more powerful features when dealing with full disaster, or the failure of individual workloads. Full and partial failovers will be more transparent with the use of the vCloud Director HTML5 Tenant UI and the vCloud Director HTML5 UI will also allow tenants to see what is happening to workloads as they boot and interact with the guest OS directly. This takes the pressure of the VCSPs helpdesk and gives tenants more control of their replicas once failed over.

Enhanced Edge Networking with NSX:

From a networking point of view, being able to access the NSX Edge Gateway for replicated workloads means that tenants can leverage the advanced networking features available on the NSX Edge Gateway. The Network Extension Appliance did a great job in offering basic network functionality however the NSX Edge offers:

  • Advanced Firewalling and NAT
  • Advanced Dynamic Routing (BGP, OSPF and more)
  • Advanced Load Balancing
  • IPsec and L2VPN
  • SSL VPN
  • SSL Certificate Services

Once a failover has been triggered from the Veeam Backup & Replication Console or via the VCSPs own Portals, the ability to manage and configure everything through the vCloud Director HTML5 UI utilizing NSX via vCloud Director enhances Cloud Connect Replication for both service providers and tenants.

Network Automation During Partial Failovers with the NEA:

There are a number of options that can be used to extend the tenant network to the service provider cloud network when actioning a partial failover. Tenants and service providers can configure:

  • Custom IPsec VPN
  • IPsec or L2VPN via the NSX Edge Gateway
  • NEA to NEA L2 VPN

The Network Extension Appliance is still available for deployment in the same way as before Update 4 and can be used directly from within a vCloud Director virtual datacenter. The NEA’s automate the extension of a tenant network so that the failed over workload can be accessible from the tenant network, even though it resides in the service provider’s environment. The NEA to NEA option is the simplest and most effective way to extend the tenants network to the cloud network.

NOTE: I will be dedicating a seperate blog post to this feature as I believe this is one of the leading innovative features we have as part of Cloud Connect Replication.

vCloud Director 9.7 Compatibility:

Just a quick note to finish that at the time of writing this post, Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update4a does not officially support vCloud Director 9.7. We currently support up to vCloud Director 9.5 but will be looking to add supportability for 9.7 within the next 90 days.

Wrap Up:

DRaaS is something that is only just becoming recognized as something that organizations require as part of their overall data protection strategy. Veeam has had a strong offering delivered through our VCSPs for a while now, with a strong focus on network automation which is typically the hardest part of any DRaaS offering. With Cloud Connect Replication now targeting vCloud Director we now have a very compelling DRaaS product that is simple, flexible and reliable…yet still delivers enterprise grade functionality.

Quick Post – vCloud Director 9.5.0.3 Released as Critical Update

Late last week, on the same day as vCloud Director 9.7 was released to GA, an update was also released for vCloud Director 9.5.x which has been marked are critical. Specifically it relates to a vulnerability in previous vCloud Director 9.5.x with identifier CVE-2019-5523. Ironically this threat targets the new Tenant and Provider Portals.

VMware vCloud Director for Service Providers update resolves a Remote Session Hijack vulnerability in the Tenant and Provider Portals. Successful exploitation of this issue may allow a malicious actor to access the Tenant or Provider Portals by impersonating a currently logged in session.

Obviously given that vCloud Director 9.7 has just been release it’s unlikely that most Service Providers will upgrade right away, therefore the majority will be running vCloud Director 9.5.x for some time yet.

vCloud Director 9.0.x and 9.1.x are not affected.

References:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/vCloud-Director/9.5/rn/vCloud-Director-9503-for-Service-Providers-Release-Notes.html

https://www.vmware.com/security/advisories/VMSA-2019-0004.html

Released: vCloud Director 9.5 – Full HTML5 Tenant UI, NSX-T Thoughts and More!

Last week VMware released vCloud Director 9.5 (build 10266189) which builds on the 9.1 release that came out earlier this year. This continues to deliver on VMware’s promise to release major vCD updates every six months or so. This update completes the HTML5 Tenant Portal port as well as continuing to enhance the usability of the HTML5 interface by extending the Provider UI to be more functional. Under the hood there are a number of networking enhancements as well as the initial introduction of a vCD Cell Appliance.

New Features and Enhancements:

  • Fully Functional HTML5 Tenant Portal
  • Cross-OrgVDC and Multi-Site Cross-VDC Networking
  • Initial Support for NSX-T
  • Enhanced Role Base Access Control (RBAC)
  • vCloud Director Appliance
  • IPv6 Support for Guest VMs
  • Updated Plugin for vRealize Orchestrator
  • API and SDK Enhancements
  • Container Service Extension (CSE) 1.2

In this post, I am going to focus more on the HTML5 Tenant and Provider Portal as well as touch on some of the important changes to supportability this release brings. As you can see from the list above, there are a number of major features to talk about, and i’ll try to put together a few more posts over the next few weeks digging into them specifically.

Tenant UI Reaches Feature Parity:

Starting from this release the reliance on the old Flex based portal is no more. All tenant tasks have been ported over to the HTML5 portal along with a lot of additional enhancements. If I think back a couple years ago when vCloud Director was at a cross roads in terms of how VMware continued to develop it, it’s amazing to see this new UI fully complete.

Everything that Tenant’s could see in the Flex UI is present in the HTML5 UI. Some of the additions include a recent tasks pane, support for independent disks is not only an API only feature now and can be accessed via the UI as well as Affinity Rules being configurable from the HTML portal.

Provider UI Improvements:

Heading over to /provider will get you into the HTML5 Provider UI. This now lists all vCD Organizations and you can create a new Org and then click through to the Tenant UI as Administrator to perform configuration tasks

You can also manage Catalogs and as with vCD 9.1 you can manage the Content Library through the provider UI. What else is new in 9.5 is the ability to allow the management of users, groups, roles, global roles.

Depreciated APIs and Functionality:

vCD 9.5 brings with it the end of support for Oracle Database which brings full circle the requirement for Oracle. Many of you who started on vCD when it was in Beta or v1 remember that it needed an Oracle database and didn’t support MSSQL. With the support of PostgreSQL it’s now ironcially MSSQL’s days that are numbered with 9.5 being the last release to support MSSQL as the vCD Database. 

For those that use vCloud Network Isolation (VCDNI), that is now also no longer supported as well as a continued end of support for Older API Versions with version 19.0 and earlier no longer supported.

From a networking point of view vCD 9.5 is the last release to support the creation edge devices in the non-advanced mode which is effectively the old vShield mode. Only edge devices that have been created or converted to advanced will be supported by the HTML5 UI.

Compatibility with Veeam, vSphere 6.5, 6.7, NSX-v 6.4.x and NSX-T 2.2 Support:

On the NSX-T front…from the release notes:

vCloud Director 9.5 is the first version to support NSX-T, which can be combined with the existing support for NSX-V in the same vCloud Director installation. You can add a NSX-T Manager and the corresponding vCenter(s) as a resource in vCD (via API) and create a Provider VDC (PVDC) that is backed by NSX-T. All the vCenters in this PVDC should be backed the same NSX-T manager. All the hosts in these vCenters then will be installed with the DPDK switch. A VLAN backed network pool for each OrgVDC can be created,
from this the network configuration on tenant side is the same as with NSX-V.

NSX-T is something that VMware is pushing very hard now, and i’ll be honest in saying that i’ve not had a chance to tinker with it. I’m still very much in tune with NSX-v however it’s clear from the push of NSX-T into VMware Cloud on AWS and now into vCD that it is the network virtualization platform of choice moving forward…though I must check on the progress of the Edge devices. These are critical to tenant edge services that front a vDC and there is a lot of power in the current NSX-v edges.

Current NSX Platform? Future Direction?

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vCloud Director 9.5 is compatible with the latest vSphere 6.7, 6.5 Update 2 (but not 6.5 GA) and NSX-v 6.4.3 and supports full interoperability with other versions as shown in the VMware Product Interoperability Matrix. Interestingly enough, 9.5 has more supportability for NSX-v and obviously with NSX-T having initial limited support.

With regards to Veeam support, I am sure that our QA department will be testing the 9.5 release against our integration pieces at the first opportunity they get, but as of now, there is no ETA on offical support.

There are only two resolved issues in this build and there are a number of known issues that can be found here.

Conclusion:

Overall this is again, a very strong release and it’s clear to now see that vCD is 100% supported and backed by VMware. You can start to see a shift of the platform away from just being an abstraction layer to becoming what could be a brokerage engine expanding on the extensibility thats being built into the product under the hood. vCloud Director 9.5 continues to fulfil the promise of enabling SDDC functionality to VMware service providers.

There is a White Paper where you can find more details about what’s contained in the 9.5 release. Tom Fojta and Daniel Paluszek from VMware have a what’s new blog posts as well.

#LongLivevCD

References:

https://cloudsolutions.vmware.com/assets/blt4e4a9fe9b7954100/What’s%20New%20with%20vCloud%20Director%209.5.pdf

https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vCloud-Director-for-Service-Providers/9.5/rn/vmware-vcloud-director-for-service-providers-95-release-notes.html

Adding Let’s Encrypt SSL Certificate to vCloud Director Keystore

For the longest time the configuring of vCloud Director’s SSL certificate keystore has been the thing that makes vCD admins shudder. There are lots of posts on the process…some good…some not so good. I even have a post from way back in 2012 about fronting vCD with a Citrix NetScaler and if I am honest, I cheated in having HTTPS at the load balancer deal with the SSL certificate while leaving vCD configured with the self signed cert. With the changes to the way the HTML5 Tenant Portal deals with certs and DNS I’m not sure that method would even work today.

I wanted to try and update the self signed certs in both my lab environments to assist in resolving the No Datacenters are available issue that cropped up in vCD 9.1. Instead of generating and using self signed certs I decided to try use Let’s Encrypt signed certs. Most of the process below is curtesy of blog posts from Luca Dell’Oca and it’s worth looking at this blog post from Tom Fojta who has a PowerShell script to automate Let’s Encrypt SSL certs for us on NSX Edge load balancers.

In my case, I wanted to install the cert directly into the vCD Cell Keystore. The manual end to end the process is listed below. I intend to try and automate this process so as to overcome the one constraint with using Let’s Encrypt…that is the 90 day lifespan of the certs. I think that is acceptable and it ensures validity of the SSL cert and a fair caveat given the main use case for this is in lab environments.

Generating the Signed SSL Cert from Let’s Encrypt:

To complete this process you need the ACMESharp PowerShell module. There are a couple of steps to follow which include registering the domain you want to create the SSL cert against, triggering a verification challenge that can be done by creating a domain TXT record as shown in the output of the challenge command. Once submitted, you need to look out for a Valid Status response.

Once complete, there is a script that can be run as show on Luca’s Blog. I’ve added to the script to automatically import the newly created SSL cert into the Local Computer certificate store.

From here, I exported the certificate with the private key so that you are left with a PFX file. I also saved to Base-64 X.509 format the Root and Intermediate certs that form the whole chain. This is required to help resolve the No Datacenters are available error mentioned above. Upload the three files to the vCD cell and continue as shown below.

Importing Signed SSL from Let’s Encrypt into vCD Keystore:

Next, the steps to take on the vCD Cell can be the most complex steps to follow and this is where I have seen different posts do different things. Below shows the commands from start to finish that worked for me…see inline for comments on what each command is doing.

Once that has been done and the vCD services has restarted, the SSL cert has been applied and we are all green and the Let’s Encrypt SSL cert is in play.

vCloud Director Tenant UI: Dude…Where is my VM Web Console?

As most of you should know buy now, vCloud Director 9.0 features a new HTML5 Tenant UI Portal which is not only very pretty, but also functional. As of the 9.0 release the HTML5 Tenant UI has a limited scope of functionality compared to the legacy Flex based web console but is still a great example of where vCD is going in terms of continuing to enhance vCD.

I was having a discussion on Slack with Mark Ukotic talking about future vCD releases when he commented that he was looking forward to the Web Console coming to the HTML5 UI. To which I said “It was already there!” He replied saying “Really?” to which I replied…

On the Virtual Machines page, you can click on the VMware graphic which will open a Web Console window.

You won’t see the mouse change to indicate that the area is hot, which is why most people assume that the option to launch the Web Console isn’t there. But if you click on it, the Web Console window will pop up and you will be able to interact with the VM.

It is a very limited console in terms of remote actions you can perform. There is a lot more functionality in the VMware Remote Console…hopefully we will see that available to launch through the new Tennant UI in upcoming versions.

If the VM if powered off you will get the following message if you try to click on the image.

So there you have it! The Web Console is there in the new HTML5 Tenant UI in vCloud Director 9.0…it’s not super obvious, but it is there!

#LongLivevCD

Awarded vExpert Cloud – A New vExpert Sub Program

Last week Corey Romero announced the inaugural members of the vExpert Cloud sub-program. This is the third vExpert sub-program following the vSAN and NSX programs announced last year. There are 135 initial vExpert Cloud members who have been awarded the title. As it so happens I am now a member of all three which reflects on the focus I’ve had and still have around VMware’s cloud, storage and networking products leading up to and after my move to Veeam last year.

Even with my move, that hasn’t stopped me working around these VMware vertices as Veeam works closely with VMware to offer supportability and integration with vCloud Director as well as being certified with vSAN for data protection. And more recently as it pertains specifically to the vExpert Cloud program, we are going to be supporting vCloud
Director in v10 of Backup & Replication for Cloud Connect Replication and also at VMworld 2017 we where announced as a launch partner for data protection for VMware Cloud on AWS.

For those wondering what does it take to be a part of the vExpert Cloud program:

We are looking for vExperts who are evangelizing VMware Cloud and delivering on the principles of the multi-cloud world being the new normal. Specificity we are looking for community activities which follow the same format as the vExpert program (blogs, books, videos, public speaking, VMUG Leadership, conference sessions speaking and so on).

And in terms of the focus of the vExpert Cloud program:

The program is focused on VMware Cloud influencer activities, VMware, AWS and other cloud environments and use of the products and services in way that delivers the VMware Cloud reality of consistency across multi-cloud environments.

Again, thank you to Corey and team for the award and I look forward to continuing to spread the community messaging around Cloud, NSX and vSAN.

vCloud Director 9.0: Digging into the new Standalone VM Feature

vCloud Director 9.0 was released late last month and brought with it a number of big new features and enhancements. If you are interested in a overview of what’s new, head here to my launch post. Getting back to this post I wanted to focus on what I think is a significant change to the way in which workloads are thought about in vCD…the Standalone VM.

Standalone Virtual machines can be instantiated and viewed along with virtual machines as part of a vApp container. A filter button creates a list based on Virtual machines, virtual applications or both.

The vApp container construct in vCloud Director carries divided opinion from both services providers and customers of vCD with one side liking the fact that VMs could be grouped into logical vApps and treated as a like group or VMs such as an Exchange Cluster. While others wanted the ability to deploy standalone VMs that where more like VM instances you find in public clouds. Historically from a programatic point of view the creation of a VM within a vApp had it’s challenges in a chicken and egg type of scenario where by the composition and recomposiontion of the VM within the vApp required a specific order. This was improved from 8.0 with enhancements to vApp functionality, including the ability to reconfigure virtual machines within a vApp, and network connectivity and virtual machine capability during vApp instantiation.

Standalone Virtual Machines:

In vCloud Director 9.0 you can now create and configure individual Virtual Machines form the new HTML5 Tenant UI. Under the compute menu you now have a Virtual Machines and vApps tab. From here you can view either standalone VMs, VMs in a vApp or both. This is also where you can create a new VM. Note that you can’t create new vApps from the new UI just yet…that still needs to be done in the Flash based UI.

You now have the ability to choose from three pre-canned instance sizes which come with default resources depending on the type of VM selected. However you can still customize the VM as shown below.

When provisioned the VM is available from the new tenant UI with all the normal operations possible. The biggest difference here is that you don’t need to worry about the vApp state and that it’s independent from any other VMs. As a side note as it’s not 100% obvious, to view the console of the VM click on the icon top right of the Virtual Machine box.

Standalone VMs in vCenter and Flash UI:

Taking a look under the covers of the HTML5 UI the standalone VMs are represented slightly differently in vCenter. in Previous versions each VM was created with the VM name plus a UUID…when a standalone VM is created the VM name is just that…the VM name.

However what is interesting is when you look in the Flash UI you will see that in fact the standalone VM is still contained within a vCD vAPP construct.

So in effect, that HTML5 UI is presenting the VM as standalone, but in actual fact there is still a one to one relationship with a vApp under the covers. Taking a look back in vCenter under the folder view it’s more representative of what you see in the Flash UI.

Standalone VMs via the API:

Querying the API shows that the Standalone VMs are indeed composed within a traditional vCD vApp.

References:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/vCloud-Director/9.0/rn/rel_notes_vcloud_director_90.html

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