Tag Archives: vCD

Released: vCloud Director 9.5 – Full HTML5 Tenant UI, NSX-T Thoughts and More!

Last week VMware released vCloud Director 9.5 (build 10266189) which builds on the 9.1 release that came out earlier this year. This continues to deliver on VMware’s promise to release major vCD updates every six months or so. This update completes the HTML5 Tenant Portal port as well as continuing to enhance the usability of the HTML5 interface by extending the Provider UI to be more functional. Under the hood there are a number of networking enhancements as well as the initial introduction of a vCD Cell Appliance.

New Features and Enhancements:

  • Fully Functional HTML5 Tenant Portal
  • Cross-OrgVDC and Multi-Site Cross-VDC Networking
  • Initial Support for NSX-T
  • Enhanced Role Base Access Control (RBAC)
  • vCloud Director Appliance
  • IPv6 Support for Guest VMs
  • Updated Plugin for vRealize Orchestrator
  • API and SDK Enhancements
  • Container Service Extension (CSE) 1.2

In this post, I am going to focus more on the HTML5 Tenant and Provider Portal as well as touch on some of the important changes to supportability this release brings. As you can see from the list above, there are a number of major features to talk about, and i’ll try to put together a few more posts over the next few weeks digging into them specifically.

Tenant UI Reaches Feature Parity:

Starting from this release the reliance on the old Flex based portal is no more. All tenant tasks have been ported over to the HTML5 portal along with a lot of additional enhancements. If I think back a couple years ago when vCloud Director was at a cross roads in terms of how VMware continued to develop it, it’s amazing to see this new UI fully complete.

Everything that Tenant’s could see in the Flex UI is present in the HTML5 UI. Some of the additions include a recent tasks pane, support for independent disks is not only an API only feature now and can be accessed via the UI as well as Affinity Rules being configurable from the HTML portal.

Provider UI Improvements:

Heading over to /provider will get you into the HTML5 Provider UI. This now lists all vCD Organizations and you can create a new Org and then click through to the Tenant UI as Administrator to perform configuration tasks

You can also manage Catalogs and as with vCD 9.1 you can manage the Content Library through the provider UI. What else is new in 9.5 is the ability to allow the management of users, groups, roles, global roles.

Depreciated APIs and Functionality:

vCD 9.5 brings with it the end of support for Oracle Database which brings full circle the requirement for Oracle. Many of you who started on vCD when it was in Beta or v1 remember that it needed an Oracle database and didn’t support MSSQL. With the support of PostgreSQL it’s now ironcially MSSQL’s days that are numbered with 9.5 being the last release to support MSSQL as the vCD Database. 

For those that use vCloud Network Isolation (VCDNI), that is now also no longer supported as well as a continued end of support for Older API Versions with version 19.0 and earlier no longer supported.

From a networking point of view vCD 9.5 is the last release to support the creation edge devices in the non-advanced mode which is effectively the old vShield mode. Only edge devices that have been created or converted to advanced will be supported by the HTML5 UI.

Compatibility with Veeam, vSphere 6.5, 6.7, NSX-v 6.4.x and NSX-T 2.2 Support:

On the NSX-T front…from the release notes:

vCloud Director 9.5 is the first version to support NSX-T, which can be combined with the existing support for NSX-V in the same vCloud Director installation. You can add a NSX-T Manager and the corresponding vCenter(s) as a resource in vCD (via API) and create a Provider VDC (PVDC) that is backed by NSX-T. All the vCenters in this PVDC should be backed the same NSX-T manager. All the hosts in these vCenters then will be installed with the DPDK switch. A VLAN backed network pool for each OrgVDC can be created,
from this the network configuration on tenant side is the same as with NSX-V.

NSX-T is something that VMware is pushing very hard now, and i’ll be honest in saying that i’ve not had a chance to tinker with it. I’m still very much in tune with NSX-v however it’s clear from the push of NSX-T into VMware Cloud on AWS and now into vCD that it is the network virtualization platform of choice moving forward…though I must check on the progress of the Edge devices. These are critical to tenant edge services that front a vDC and there is a lot of power in the current NSX-v edges.

Current NSX Platform? Future Direction?

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vCloud Director 9.5 is compatible with the latest vSphere 6.7, 6.5 Update 2 (but not 6.5 GA) and NSX-v 6.4.3 and supports full interoperability with other versions as shown in the VMware Product Interoperability Matrix. Interestingly enough, 9.5 has more supportability for NSX-v and obviously with NSX-T having initial limited support.

With regards to Veeam support, I am sure that our QA department will be testing the 9.5 release against our integration pieces at the first opportunity they get, but as of now, there is no ETA on offical support.

There are only two resolved issues in this build and there are a number of known issues that can be found here.

Conclusion:

Overall this is again, a very strong release and it’s clear to now see that vCD is 100% supported and backed by VMware. You can start to see a shift of the platform away from just being an abstraction layer to becoming what could be a brokerage engine expanding on the extensibility thats being built into the product under the hood. vCloud Director 9.5 continues to fulfil the promise of enabling SDDC functionality to VMware service providers.

There is a White Paper where you can find more details about what’s contained in the 9.5 release. Tom Fojta and Daniel Paluszek from VMware have a what’s new blog posts as well.

#LongLivevCD

References:

https://cloudsolutions.vmware.com/assets/blt4e4a9fe9b7954100/What’s%20New%20with%20vCloud%20Director%209.5.pdf

https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vCloud-Director-for-Service-Providers/9.5/rn/vmware-vcloud-director-for-service-providers-95-release-notes.html

Adding Let’s Encrypt SSL Certificate to vCloud Director Keystore

For the longest time the configuring of vCloud Director’s SSL certificate keystore has been the thing that makes vCD admins shudder. There are lots of posts on the process…some good…some not so good. I even have a post from way back in 2012 about fronting vCD with a Citrix NetScaler and if I am honest, I cheated in having HTTPS at the load balancer deal with the SSL certificate while leaving vCD configured with the self signed cert. With the changes to the way the HTML5 Tenant Portal deals with certs and DNS I’m not sure that method would even work today.

I wanted to try and update the self signed certs in both my lab environments to assist in resolving the No Datacenters are available issue that cropped up in vCD 9.1. Instead of generating and using self signed certs I decided to try use Let’s Encrypt signed certs. Most of the process below is curtesy of blog posts from Luca Dell’Oca and it’s worth looking at this blog post from Tom Fojta who has a PowerShell script to automate Let’s Encrypt SSL certs for us on NSX Edge load balancers.

In my case, I wanted to install the cert directly into the vCD Cell Keystore. The manual end to end the process is listed below. I intend to try and automate this process so as to overcome the one constraint with using Let’s Encrypt…that is the 90 day lifespan of the certs. I think that is acceptable and it ensures validity of the SSL cert and a fair caveat given the main use case for this is in lab environments.

Generating the Signed SSL Cert from Let’s Encrypt:

To complete this process you need the ACMESharp PowerShell module. There are a couple of steps to follow which include registering the domain you want to create the SSL cert against, triggering a verification challenge that can be done by creating a domain TXT record as shown in the output of the challenge command. Once submitted, you need to look out for a Valid Status response.

Once complete, there is a script that can be run as show on Luca’s Blog. I’ve added to the script to automatically import the newly created SSL cert into the Local Computer certificate store.

From here, I exported the certificate with the private key so that you are left with a PFX file. I also saved to Base-64 X.509 format the Root and Intermediate certs that form the whole chain. This is required to help resolve the No Datacenters are available error mentioned above. Upload the three files to the vCD cell and continue as shown below.

Importing Signed SSL from Let’s Encrypt into vCD Keystore:

Next, the steps to take on the vCD Cell can be the most complex steps to follow and this is where I have seen different posts do different things. Below shows the commands from start to finish that worked for me…see inline for comments on what each command is doing.

Once that has been done and the vCD services has restarted, the SSL cert has been applied and we are all green and the Let’s Encrypt SSL cert is in play.

Released: vCloud Director 9.1.0.1 – API Tweaks and Resolved Issues

There was a point release of vCloud Director 9.1 (9.1.0.1 Build 8825802) released last week, bringing with it an updated Java Runtime plus new API functions that allow additional configuration of advanced settings for virtual machines. There was also a number of bug fixes from the initial 9.1 release earlier in the year. Some of the issues that are resolved are significant and worth looking into if you have 9.1 GA deployed.

I haven’t been able to find an exact list of the new API functions, however traversing the Org Admin rights API call I did spot something new relating to Latency as show below.

And when I granted this right through the API mechanism I was able to allocate the right to the Org Admin via the administrator web interface.

I’m trying get a list of all the new API rights that where added as part of this release and will update this post when I have them.

Some of the bigger issues that where resolved are listed below:

  • In vCloud Director Tenant Portal, the Configure Services tab is disabled for Advanced Edge Gateway. In vCloud Director Tenant Portal, you cannot configure Advanced Edge Gateway settings as an administrator with any of the Gateway Advanced Services rights.
  • When importing a virtual machine from vCenter Server, vCloud Director relocates it to the primary resource pool. When you import a virtual machine created on a non-primary cluster in vCenter Server to vCloud Director, the machine is always relocated to the primary cluster.
  • In the vCloud Director Tenant Portal, the administrator of one organization can see virtual machines that belong to other vCloud Director organizations. When you configure the organizations in vCloud Director to use an LDAP server for authentication, an administrator of one organization, who is logged in vCloud Director Tenant Portal, can see virtual machines that belong to other organizations.
  • Importing a virtual machine from the vCenter Server deletes the original virtual machine after cloning it. When importing a virtual machine from the vCenter Server to vCloud Director involves changing its datastore, the process consists in cloning the source virtual machine and deleting it, while effectively changing its Managed Object Reference (MoRef).
  • Enabling High Availability for existing edge gateways in a data center with installed NSX Edge 6.4.0 fails.  In a data center with installed NSX Edge 6.4.0, you cannot enable High Availability for existing edge gateways that belong to a datastore cluster with enabled Storage Distributed Resource Scheduler (SDRS).
  • vCloud Director Tenant Portal does not display existing organization virtual data centers. When you use a self-signed SSL certificate for vCloud Director and you log in to vCloud Director Tenant Portal, you do not see a list of the existing organization virtual data centers.

The rest can be found here.

Just to finish up, there is still a lingering issue from the GA release that changed the behaviour of the HTML5 Tenant UI in scenarios where the SSL self signed certificates are used which is covered in this VMwareKB. Even though (as shown above) it’s been listed as resolved…I have run into it again in two different installs.

Obviously, if you are using legit SSL certificates you won’t have the issue, however the work around is not doing it’s thing for me. Hopefully I can resolve this ASAP as I am about to start some validation testing for Veeam and vCloud Director as well as start to test out our new functionality coming in Update 4 of Backup & Replication for Cloud Connect Replication.

For those with the correct entitlements…download here.

#LongLivevCD

References:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/vCloud-Director/9.1/rn/rel_notes_vcloud_director_9-1-0-1.html

Released: vCloud Director 9.1 – New HTML5 Features, vCD-CLI and more!

Overnight VMware released vCloud Director 9.1 (build 7905680) which builds on the 9.0 release that came out last September. This continues to deliver on VMware’s promise to release major vCD updates every six months or so. This update, on the surface contains fewer big ticket items than the 9.0 release however the enhancements included are actually significant and continue to build on where 9.0 left off.

New Features and Enhancements:
  • Enhanced Tenant Portal
  • HTML Provider Portal
  • User Interface Extensibility
  • Service Integration
  • Standalone VMRC
  • Multi-Site Management View
  • SR-IOV
  • FIPS Mode
  • Python SDK
  • vCD-CLI
  • vRealize Orchestrator Integration
Enhanced Tenant Portal:

The new Tenant UI features include vApp and Catalog enhancements while delivering on probably the biggest pain point with the Flex UI tenant portal…that is OFV/OVA management. We now have native upload and download integration without the need for the client integration plugin.

You now also get an overview of resources consumed in your Virtual Datacenters and also get a view of the multiple organisation feature introduced into 9.0.

A new Provider Portal has been seeded in this release and at the moment can only be used for the new vRealise Orchestrator extensibility functionality. The administrator can import workflows from vRO through the import option. An administrator clicks the import workflow button, selects the vRO instance, and then chooses all the workflows they would like to import. On that note, there is an updated vRO Plug-In that allows both providers and tenants to automate tasks from the portal which is an excellent feature.

There is also a new workflow for the provision of standalone VMs and vApps.

Standalone VMRC:

If the management of OVAs/OVFs wasn’t the number one pain point with the FlexUI then the next one would have had to be the pain caused by the lack of functionality in the Console window. A HTML VM console is supported in version 9.0, but 9.1 now adds support for standalone VMware Remote Console. The VMRC provides more functions such for the tenant and significantly improves access to the VM consoles and gives greater flexibility accessing the VMs.

vCD-CLI:

I’ve blogged about the old VCA-CLI on a number of occasions and it’s great to see the project officially brought back into the vCD world. Development on this stopped for a while with the demise of vCloud Air, however I’m glad to see it picked up on as it’s a great tool for managing vCloud Director tenant Organisations and objects from a command line without having to get stuck into the APIs directly. It’s also used for the new Container Services Extension that has also been released side by side with this release of vCD.

Compatibility with Veeam, vSphere 6.5 and NSX-v 6.4.x:

vCloud Director 9.1 is compatible with vSphere 6.5 Update 1 and NSX-v 6.4 and supports full interoperability with other versions as shown in the VMware Product Interoperability Matrix. With regards to Veeam support, I am sure that our QA department will be testing the 9.1 release against our integration pieces at the first opportunity they get, but as of now, there is no ETA on offical support.

A list of known issues can be found in the release notes.

Conclusion:

Overall this is a very strong release with a lot of emphasis on extensibility behind the visual enhancements and functionality of the ever evolving HTML Tenant UI. As usual, I’ll look to write a few more blog posts on specific 9.1 features over the next couple of weeks.

There is a White Paper where you can find more details about what’s contained in the 9.1 release. Tom Fojta and Daniel Paluszek VMware have a what’s new blog posts as well.

#LongLivevCD

References:

https://blogs.vmware.com/vcloud/files/2018/03/vcd91newfeatureswp.pdf

VMware vCloud Director 9.1 is out!

vCloud Director Tenant UI: Dude…Where is my VM Web Console?

As most of you should know buy now, vCloud Director 9.0 features a new HTML5 Tenant UI Portal which is not only very pretty, but also functional. As of the 9.0 release the HTML5 Tenant UI has a limited scope of functionality compared to the legacy Flex based web console but is still a great example of where vCD is going in terms of continuing to enhance vCD.

I was having a discussion on Slack with Mark Ukotic talking about future vCD releases when he commented that he was looking forward to the Web Console coming to the HTML5 UI. To which I said “It was already there!” He replied saying “Really?” to which I replied…

On the Virtual Machines page, you can click on the VMware graphic which will open a Web Console window.

You won’t see the mouse change to indicate that the area is hot, which is why most people assume that the option to launch the Web Console isn’t there. But if you click on it, the Web Console window will pop up and you will be able to interact with the VM.

It is a very limited console in terms of remote actions you can perform. There is a lot more functionality in the VMware Remote Console…hopefully we will see that available to launch through the new Tennant UI in upcoming versions.

If the VM if powered off you will get the following message if you try to click on the image.

So there you have it! The Web Console is there in the new HTML5 Tenant UI in vCloud Director 9.0…it’s not super obvious, but it is there!

#LongLivevCD

Released: vCloud Director 9.0.0.2 – Important Networking Fixes!

Last week VMware put out a new point release for vCloud Director 9.0 (Build 7553273) for Service Providers. While there is nothing new in this release there are a significant number of resolved issues as listed in the release notes. One thing to mention is that even though this was released during a similar timeframe to NSX-v 6.4 there is no offical compatibility just yet.

Reading through the list of resolved issues there where some pretty impactful errors that seem to be related mostly to NSX operations and networking in general.

  • Deleting a Provider VDC can corrupt VXLAN network pools that are in use After you delete a Provider VDC, its associated VXLAN network pool becomes unusable by organization VDCs backed by other Provider VDCs.
  • The Redeploy an Edge Gateway from vCloud Director task succeeds instantly but the Edge does not actually redeploy in NSX When you attempt to redeploy an Edge Gateway from vCloud Director, the API initiates a task in vCloud Director and in vCenter Server but does not send a redeploy request to the NSX server. As a consequence, the Edge Gateway does not redeploy.
  • Registration of an NSX Server fails when you supply the credentials of an SSO user vCloud Director SSO users are not authorized to access an NSX endpoint required for registration, so registration fails.
  • Changes on Edge Gateway Services are not synchronized between vCloud Director and NSX When you modify one of the Edge Gateway Services, for example by creating a Static Route, the change is saved on the vCloud Director side but cannot be saved on the NSX server.
  • Creating or updating a firewall rule for an Advanced Gateway Portal with enabling the Show only user-defined rules toggle causes the action of the default firewall rule to change. When you create a new firewall rule or update an existing rule for an Advanced Gateway Portal, if you enable the Show only user-defined rules toggle, the action of the default firewall rule changes incorrectly to match the last modified rule.
  • Deleting an external network that uses a distributed virtual port group with a Private VLAN does not work When you try to delete an external network that is liked to a private VLAN associated with a distributed virtual port group (dvPortgroup), the deletion fails with an InternalError: Only single VLAN or trunk VLAN is supported error message.
  • You cannot add a DNAT rule configuring an original or a translated port or port range through the tenant portal When you attempt to add a DNAT rule from the Edge Gateway screen in the tenant portal, you cannot enter either a port or a port range in the Original Port and the Translated Port text boxes.
  • Creating a SNAT or a DNAT network rule by using a public IP address that is not associated to a particular network interface fails When you try to create a SNAT or a DNAT network rule for either an internal or an external interface in vCloud Director, if the public IP address is not added to a particular network interface, you receive a the following error message:
  • Configuring a static route fails if you set the gateway of an external network as a next hop IP address When you configure a static route for an organization network, if you enter the address of an existing default gateway in the Next Hop IP text box, saving the static route configuration fails with the following error message:

Good to seem them fixing issues quickly but it also tells me that a lot of people participating in the beta for 9.0 didn’t test deep enough against real word scenarios…a lot of what is listed above isn’t what you would consider corner cases. These issues should have bene picked up before going to GA. Possibly also shows that a lot of VCPP Service Providers haven’t upgraded to 9.0 just yet. In any case the vCloud product development team has been hard at work resolving the bugs and Service Providers should be confident deploying or upgrading to 9.0 now.

#LongLivevCD

If you are a vCAN SP and have the right entitlements follow this link to download vCloud Director 9.0.0.2:

References:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vCloud-Director-for-Service-Providers/9.0.0.2/rn/rel_notes_vcloud_director_9-0-0-2.html

 

 

Released: vCloud Director 8.10 and 8.20 Point Updates

Last week VMware snuck out two point releases for vCloud Director 8.10 and 8.20. For those still running those versions you now have 8.10.1.1 (Build 6878548) and for 8.20 there 8.20.0.2 (Build 6875354) available for download. These are both patch upgrades and resolve a number of bugs, some of which appear to be mirrored in both versions.

Scanning the Release Notes, below are some of the more notable fixes:

8.10

  • Resource limit change for a vCloud Edge Gateway Resolves an issue where the memory limit for a compact and full-4 Edge Gateway was insufficient. Memory was increased from 512MB to 2048MB
  • Performing hardware changes to a VM fails Resolves an issue where performing hardware changes to a VM in vCloud Director fails with an error message:
  • Degraded performance due to insufficient memory Resolves an issue that could lead to an insufficient memory reservation of the NSX Edge VMs, which might cause poor performance.
  • Catalog synchronization failure Resolves an issue where synchronization of a remote catalog item fails with an out of memory, causing the vCloud Director cell to crash.

8.20

  • Incorrect status update for VMs storage profile or disk-level storage Resolves an issue that could cause a VM storage profile or disk-level storage profile to be updated incorrectly when the VM is included in a recompose operation. This fix ensures that PvdcComputeGuaranteeValidator runs even when the deployment fails in Pay-As-You-Go allocation model. With this fix, the undeploy workflow ignores the VM deployment state if the undeploy operation is called with a force=true flag.
  • Failure to move virtual machines between shared datastores Resolves a storage issue where moving a virtual machine from one shared datastore to another fails.
  • Failure to revert VM snapshots Resolves an issue that could cause reverting to a virtual machine snapshot to fail
  • Failure to allocate an external IP address and a gateway IP address Resolves several issues in managing the allocation of external IP a gateway IP addresses during VM boot and runtime when the NAT service is enabled and IP Translation is set manually.
  • Failure to delete Organization VDC Resolves an issue that could cause various operations to fail.

So a small point release for good to see the team continuing to improve the platform for those not yet able to upgrade to the latest 9.0 release. If you have the entitlements, head to the MyVMware site to download the builds.

References:

http://pubs.vmware.com/Release_Notes/en/vcd/81011/rel_notes_vcloud_director_8-10-1-1.html

http://pubs.vmware.com/Release_Notes/en/vcd/82002/rel_notes_vcloud_director_8-20-0-2.html

vCloud Director 9.0: Digging into the new Standalone VM Feature

vCloud Director 9.0 was released late last month and brought with it a number of big new features and enhancements. If you are interested in a overview of what’s new, head here to my launch post. Getting back to this post I wanted to focus on what I think is a significant change to the way in which workloads are thought about in vCD…the Standalone VM.

Standalone Virtual machines can be instantiated and viewed along with virtual machines as part of a vApp container. A filter button creates a list based on Virtual machines, virtual applications or both.

The vApp container construct in vCloud Director carries divided opinion from both services providers and customers of vCD with one side liking the fact that VMs could be grouped into logical vApps and treated as a like group or VMs such as an Exchange Cluster. While others wanted the ability to deploy standalone VMs that where more like VM instances you find in public clouds. Historically from a programatic point of view the creation of a VM within a vApp had it’s challenges in a chicken and egg type of scenario where by the composition and recomposiontion of the VM within the vApp required a specific order. This was improved from 8.0 with enhancements to vApp functionality, including the ability to reconfigure virtual machines within a vApp, and network connectivity and virtual machine capability during vApp instantiation.

Standalone Virtual Machines:

In vCloud Director 9.0 you can now create and configure individual Virtual Machines form the new HTML5 Tenant UI. Under the compute menu you now have a Virtual Machines and vApps tab. From here you can view either standalone VMs, VMs in a vApp or both. This is also where you can create a new VM. Note that you can’t create new vApps from the new UI just yet…that still needs to be done in the Flash based UI.

You now have the ability to choose from three pre-canned instance sizes which come with default resources depending on the type of VM selected. However you can still customize the VM as shown below.

When provisioned the VM is available from the new tenant UI with all the normal operations possible. The biggest difference here is that you don’t need to worry about the vApp state and that it’s independent from any other VMs. As a side note as it’s not 100% obvious, to view the console of the VM click on the icon top right of the Virtual Machine box.

Standalone VMs in vCenter and Flash UI:

Taking a look under the covers of the HTML5 UI the standalone VMs are represented slightly differently in vCenter. in Previous versions each VM was created with the VM name plus a UUID…when a standalone VM is created the VM name is just that…the VM name.

However what is interesting is when you look in the Flash UI you will see that in fact the standalone VM is still contained within a vCD vAPP construct.

So in effect, that HTML5 UI is presenting the VM as standalone, but in actual fact there is still a one to one relationship with a vApp under the covers. Taking a look back in vCenter under the folder view it’s more representative of what you see in the Flash UI.

Standalone VMs via the API:

Querying the API shows that the Standalone VMs are indeed composed within a traditional vCD vApp.

References:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/vCloud-Director/9.0/rn/rel_notes_vcloud_director_90.html

Enabling, Configuring and Viewing Metrics in vCloud Director 9.0

Last week I released a post on configuring Cassandra for vCloud Director 9.0 metrics. As a refresher, one of the cool features released in vCloud Director SP 5.6.x was the ability to expose VM metrics that service providers could expose to their clients via a set of API calls. With the release of vCloud Director 9.0, the metrics can now be viewed from the new HTML5 tenant UI, meaning that all service providers should be able to offer this to their customers.

With the Cassandra configuration out of the way, the next step is to use the Cell Management Tool to tell the vCD cells to push the VM Metric data. Before this, if you log into the HTML5 UI you will notice no menu for Monitoring…this only gets enabled once the metrics have have been enabled by the tool.

The command has changed from previous versions in line with removing the dependancy on the KairosDB and we are now calling a cassandra argument that has the following options:

Those familiar with the previous command to configure the metrics will see a lot more options that specify the Cassandra nodes, the original command to configure the schema, the username and password to connect to the Cassandra database with and the ttl for the data, meaning that if you wanted you could keep more than two weeks of data.

If you tail the Cassandra system.log while the process is happening you will see a bunch of tables being created and populated with the initial data.

With the done, if you go into the new HTML5 Tenant UI and go to the Virtual Machine view you should now see a Monitoring Chart drop down in the menu in the main window. From here you can choose any of the available metrics across a half hour, hour, day and week timescale.

API Calls to Retrieve Current and Historical Metrics:

If you still want to go old school the following API Calls are used to gather current and historical VM metrics for vCD VMs. The Machine ID required used the VM GUID as seen in vCenter. The ID can be sourced from the VM Name. The vCD Machine ID shown below in the brackets is what you are after.



Configuring Cassandra for vCloud Director 9.0 Metrics

One of the cool features released in vCloud Director SP 5.6.x was the ability to expose VM metrics that service providers could expose to their clients via a set of API calls. Some service providers took advantage of this and where able to offer basic VM metrics to their tenants through customer written portals. Zettagrid was one of those service providers and while I was at Zettagrid, I worked with the developers to get VM metrics out to our customers.

Part of the backend configuration to enable the vCloud Director cells to export the metric data was to stand up a Cassandra/KairosDB cluster. This wasn’t a straight forward exercise but after a bit of tinkering due to a lack of documentation, most service providers where able to have the backend in place to support the metrics.

With the release of vCloud Director 9.0, the requirement to have KairosDB managed by Apache has been removed and metrics can now be accessed natively in Cassandra using the cell management tool. Even cooler is that the metrics can now be viewed from the new HTML5 tenant UI, meaning that all service providers should be able to offer this to their customers.

Cassandra is an open source database that you can use to provide the backing store for a scalable, high-performance solution for collecting time series data like virtual machine metrics. If you want vCloud Director to support retrieval of historic metrics from virtual machines, you must install and configure a Cassandra cluster and use the cell-management-tool to connect the cluster to vCloud Director. Retrieval of current metrics does not require optional database software.

The vCloud Director online docs have a small install guide but it’s not very detailed. It basically says to install and configure the Cassandra cluster with four nodes, two of which are seed nodes, enabling encryption and user authentication with Java Native Access installed. Not overly descriptive. I’ve created an script below that installs and configures a basic single node Cassandra cluster that will suffice for most labs/testing environments.

Setting up Cassandra on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS:

I’ve forked an existing bash script on Github and added modifications that goes through the installation and configuration of Cassandra 2.2.6 (as per the vCD 9.0 release notes) on a single node, enabling authentication while disabling encryption in order to keep things simple.

This will obviously work on any distro that supports apt-get. Once configured you can view the Cassandra status by using the nodetool status command as shown below.

The manual steps for the Cassandra installation are below…note that they don’t include the configuration file changes required to enable authentication and set the seeds.

From here you are ready to configure vCD to push the metrics to the Cassandra database. I’ll cover that in a seperate post.

References:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/vCloud-Director/9.0/com.vmware.vcloud.install.doc/GUID-E5B8EE30-5C99-4609-B92A-B7FAEC1035CE.html

https://www.vmware.com/content/dam/digitalmarketing/vmware/en/pdf/vcloud/vmware-vcloud-director-whats-new-9-0-white-paper.pdf

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