Tag Archives: vCD

Enabling, Configuring and Viewing Metrics in vCloud Director 9.0

Last week I released a post on configuring Cassandra for vCloud Director 9.0 metrics. As a refresher, one of the cool features released in vCloud Director SP 5.6.x was the ability to expose VM metrics that service providers could expose to their clients via a set of API calls. With the release of vCloud Director 9.0, the metrics can now be viewed from the new HTML5 tenant UI, meaning that all service providers should be able to offer this to their customers.

With the Cassandra configuration out of the way, the next step is to use the Cell Management Tool to tell the vCD cells to push the VM Metric data. Before this, if you log into the HTML5 UI you will notice no menu for Monitoring…this only gets enabled once the metrics have have been enabled by the tool.

The command has changed from previous versions in line with removing the dependancy on the KairosDB and we are now calling a cassandra argument that has the following options:

Those familiar with the previous command to configure the metrics will see a lot more options that specify the Cassandra nodes, the original command to configure the schema, the username and password to connect to the Cassandra database with and the ttl for the data, meaning that if you wanted you could keep more than two weeks of data.

If you tail the Cassandra system.log while the process is happening you will see a bunch of tables being created and populated with the initial data.

With the done, if you go into the new HTML5 Tenant UI and go to the Virtual Machine view you should now see a Monitoring Chart drop down in the menu in the main window. From here you can choose any of the available metrics across a half hour, hour, day and week timescale.

API Calls to Retrieve Current and Historical Metrics:

If you still want to go old school the following API Calls are used to gather current and historical VM metrics for vCD VMs. The Machine ID required used the VM GUID as seen in vCenter. The ID can be sourced from the VM Name. The vCD Machine ID shown below in the brackets is what you are after.



Configuring Cassandra for vCloud Director 9.0 Metrics

One of the cool features released in vCloud Director SP 5.6.x was the ability to expose VM metrics that service providers could expose to their clients via a set of API calls. Some service providers took advantage of this and where able to offer basic VM metrics to their tenants through customer written portals. Zettagrid was one of those service providers and while I was at Zettagrid, I worked with the developers to get VM metrics out to our customers.

Part of the backend configuration to enable the vCloud Director cells to export the metric data was to stand up a Cassandra/KairosDB cluster. This wasn’t a straight forward exercise but after a bit of tinkering due to a lack of documentation, most service providers where able to have the backend in place to support the metrics.

With the release of vCloud Director 9.0, the requirement to have KairosDB managed by Apache has been removed and metrics can now be accessed natively in Cassandra using the cell management tool. Even cooler is that the metrics can now be viewed from the new HTML5 tenant UI, meaning that all service providers should be able to offer this to their customers.

Cassandra is an open source database that you can use to provide the backing store for a scalable, high-performance solution for collecting time series data like virtual machine metrics. If you want vCloud Director to support retrieval of historic metrics from virtual machines, you must install and configure a Cassandra cluster and use the cell-management-tool to connect the cluster to vCloud Director. Retrieval of current metrics does not require optional database software.

The vCloud Director online docs have a small install guide but it’s not very detailed. It basically says to install and configure the Cassandra cluster with four nodes, two of which are seed nodes, enabling encryption and user authentication with Java Native Access installed. Not overly descriptive. I’ve created an script below that installs and configures a basic single node Cassandra cluster that will suffice for most labs/testing environments.

Setting up Cassandra on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS:

I’ve forked an existing bash script on Github and added modifications that goes through the installation and configuration of Cassandra 2.2.6 (as per the vCD 9.0 release notes) on a single node, enabling authentication while disabling encryption in order to keep things simple.

This will obviously work on any distro that supports apt-get. Once configured you can view the Cassandra status by using the nodetool status command as shown below.

The manual steps for the Cassandra installation are below…note that they don’t include the configuration file changes required to enable authentication and set the seeds.

From here you are ready to configure vCD to push the metrics to the Cassandra database. I’ll cover that in a seperate post.

References:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/vCloud-Director/9.0/com.vmware.vcloud.install.doc/GUID-E5B8EE30-5C99-4609-B92A-B7FAEC1035CE.html

https://www.vmware.com/content/dam/digitalmarketing/vmware/en/pdf/vcloud/vmware-vcloud-director-whats-new-9-0-white-paper.pdf

vCloud Director 9.0: Manual Quick fix for VXLAN Network Pool Error

vCloud Director 9.0, released last week has a bunch of new enhancements and a lot of those are focused around it’s integration with NSX. Tom Fojta has a what’s new page on the go with a lot of the new features being explained. One of his first posts just after the GA was around the new feature of being able to manually create VXLAN backed Network Pools.

VXLAN Network Pool is recommended to be used as it scales the best. Until version 9, vCloud Director would create new VXLAN Network Pool automatically for each Provider VDC backed by NSX Transport Zone (again created automatically) scoped to cluster that belong to the particular Provider VDC. This would create multiple VXLAN network pools and potentially confusion which to use for a particular Org VDC.

In vCloud Director 9.0 we now have the option of creating a VXLAN backed network pool manually instead of one being created at the time of a setting up a Provider vDC. In many of my environments for one reason or another the automatic creation of VXLAN network pool together with NSX would fail. In fact my current NextedESXi SliemaLabs vCD instance shows the following error:

There is a similar but less serious error that can be fixed by changing the replication mode from within the NSX Web Client as detailed here by Luca, however like my lab I’ve know a few people to run into the more serious error as shown above. You can’t delete the pool and a repair operation will continue to error out. Now in vCD 9.0 we can create a new VXLAN Network Pool form the Transport Zones created in NSX.

Once that’s been done you will have the newly created VXLAN Network Pool that’s truly more global and tied to best practice for NSX Transport Zones and one that can be used with the desired replication mode. The old one will remain, but you can now configure Org vDCs to consume the VXLAN backed network pool over the traditional VLAN backed pool.

References:

vCloud Director 9: What’s New

vCloud Director 9: Create VXLAN Network Pool

Released: vCloud Director 9.0 – The Most Significant Update To Date!

Today is a good day! VMware have released to GA vCloud Director 9.0 (build 6681978) and with it come the most significant feature and enhancements of any previous vCD release. This is the 9th major release of vCloud Director, now spanning nearly six and half years since v1.0 was released in Feburary of 2011 and as mentioned from my point of view it’s the most significant update of vCloud Director to date.

Having been part of the BETA program I’ve been able to test some of the new features and enhancements over the past couple of months and even though from a Service Provider perspective there is a heap to like about what is functionally under the covers, but the biggest new feature is without doubt the HTML5 Tenant Portal however as you can see below there is a decent list of top enhancements.

Top Enhancements:

 

  • Multi-Site vCD – Single Access point URL for all vCD instances within same SP federated via SSO
  • On-premises to Cloud Migration – Plugin that enables L2 connectivity, warm and cold migration
  • Expanded NSX Integration – Security Groups, Logical Routing for east-west traffic and audit logging
  • HTML5 Tenant UI – Streamlined workflows for VM deployment, UI Extensibility for 3rd party services/functionality
  • HTML5 Metrics UI – Basic Metrics for VMs shown through tenant portal
  • Extensible Service Framework – Service enablement, SSO Ready
  • Application Extensibility – Plugin Framework
  • PostGres 9.5 Support – In addition to MSSQL and Oracle, Postgres is now supported.
  • …and more under the hood bits

I’m sure there will be a number of other blog posts focusing on the list above, and i’ll look to go through a few myself over the next few weeks but for this GA post I wanted to touch on the new HTML5 Tenant UI.

There is a What’s New in vCloud Director 9.0 PDF here.

New HTML5 Tenant UI:

The vCD team laid the foundation for this new Tenant UI in the last release of vCD in bringing the NSX Advanced HTML5 UI to version 8.20. While most things have been ported across there may still be a case for tenants to go back to the old Flex UI to do some tasks, however from what I have seen there is close to 100% full functionality.

To get to the new HTML5 Tenant UI you go to: https://<vcd>/tenant/orgname

Once logged in you are greeted with a now familiar looking VMware portal based on the Clarity UI. It’s pretty, it’s functional and it doesn’t need Flash…so haters of the existing flex based vCD portal will have to bite their tongues now 🙂

The Networking menu is inbuilt into this same Tenant portal and you you can access it directly from the new UI, or in the same way as was the case with vCD 8.20 from the flex UI. Below is a YouTube video posted by the vCD team that walks through the new UI.

There is also VM Metrics in the UI now, where previously they where only accessible after configuring the vCD Cells to route metric data to a Cassandra database. The metrics where only accessible via the API and some providers managed to tap into that and bring vCD Metrics into their own portals. With the 9.0 release this is now part of the new HTML5 Tenant UI and can be seen in the video below.

As per previous releases this only shows up to two weeks worth of basic metrics but it’s still a step in the right direction and gives vCD tenant’s enough info to do basic monitoring before hitting up a service desk for VM related help.

Conclusion:

vCloud Director 9.0 has delivered on the what most members of the VMware Cloud Provider Program had wanted for some time…that is, a continuation of the commitment to the the HTML5 UI as well as continuing to add features that help service providers extend their reach across multiple zones and over to hybrid cloud setups . As mentioned over the next few weeks, I am going to expand on the key new features and walk through how to configure elements through the UI and API.

Compatibility with Veeam, vSphere 6.5 and NSX-v 6.3.x:

vCloud Director 9.0 is compatible with vSphere 6.5 Update 1 and NSX 6.3.3 and supports full interoperability with other versions as shown in the VMware Product Interoperability Matrix. With regards to Veeam support, I am sure that our QA department will be testing the 9.0 release against our integration pieces at the first opportunity they get, but as of now, there is no ETA on offical support.

A list of known issues can be found in the release notes.

#LongLivevCD

References:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/vCloud-Director/9.0/rn/rel_notes_vcloud_director_90.html

https://www.vmware.com/content/dam/digitalmarketing/vmware/en/pdf/vcloud/vmware-vcloud-director-whats-new-9-0-white-paper.pdf

VMware Announces New vCloud Director 9.0

What’s in a name? VSPP to vCAN to VCPP

Prior to VMworld there where rumours floating around that the vCloud Air Network was going to undergo a name change and sure enough at VMworld 2017 in the US, the vCAN was no more and that the VMware Cloud and Service Provider program would be renamed to the VMware Cloud Partner Program. There has been a number of announcements around the VCPP including the upcoming release of vCloud Director 9.0, a new verification program and also at VMworld Europe new cross cloud capabilities with VMware HCX.

VMware is continuing to make significant investments to expand and enhance our portfolio of cloud products and services. At the same time, we will continue to grow and refine our program to better address your needs as a partner and, as a result, enable you to provide even better cloud service options to our mutual customers around the globe.

The VMware Cloud Verified program is interesting and I’m still a little unsure what it delivers above and beyond non verified VMware Clouds…however it seems like a good logo opportunity for providers to aspire to.

This name change was expected given the wrapping up of vCloud Air, however from talking with a lot of people within the old vCloud Air Network, the name will be missed. To me it was the best thing to come out of the whole vCloud Air experiment but I understand why it had to be changed. This isn’t so much a fresh start for the program but more of a signal that it’s growing and improving and is looking to remain a key cornerstone of VMware multi/hybrid cloud strategy.

Even though I am out of the program and not working for a partner anymore, I am very much connected by way of my interactions with the Veeam Cloud and Service Provider program (VCSP) and the success of both is tied back to not only the individual companies remaining innovative and competitive against the large hyper-scalers. It’s also incumbent on VMware and Veeam to continue to offer the tools to be able to make our providers successful.

As a critical component of the Cloud Provider Platform, the recently-announced vCloud Director 9.0 (vCloud Director 9.0 announcement blog) enables simplified cloud consumption for tenants, a fast path to hybrid services, and rapid vSphere-to-cloud migrations for cloud providers worldwide. VMware continues to demonstrate its commitment to investing in the critical products, tools, and solutions that help cloud providers rapidly deploy and monetize highly scalable cloud environments with the least amount of risk.

The name doesn’t matter…but the technology and execution of service sure as hell does!

Note: Visit CloudProviders.VMware.com. Subscribe to the VMware Cloud Provider Blog, follow @vmwarecloudprvd on Twitter or ‘like’ VMware Cloud on Facebook for future updates.

Cloud to Cloud to Cloud Networking with Veeam Powered Network

I’ve written a couple of posts on how Veeam Powered Network can make accessing your homelab easy with it’s straight forward approach to creating and connection site-to-site and point-to-site VPN connections. For a refresh on the use cases that I’ve gone through, I had a requirement where I needed access to my homelab/office machines while on the road and to to achieve this I went through two scenarios on how you can deploy and configure Veeam PN.

In this blog post I’m going to run through a very real world solution with Veeam PN where it will be used to easily connect geographically disparate cloud hosting zones. One of the most common questions I used to receive from sales and customers in my previous roles with service providers is how do we easily connect up two sites so that some form of application high availability could be achieved or even just allowing access to applications or services cross site.

Taking that further…how is this achieved in the most cost effective and operationally efficient way? There are obviously solutions available today that achieve connectivity between multiple sites, weather that be via some sort of MPLS, IPSec, L2VPN or stretched network solution. What Veeam PN achieves is a simple to configure, cost effective (remember it’s free) way to connect up one to one or one to many cloud zones with little to no overheads.

Cloud to Cloud to Cloud Veeam PN Appliance Deployment Model

In this scenario I want each vCloud Director zone to have access to the other zones and be always connected. I also want to be able to connect in via the OpenVPN endpoint client and have access to all zones remotely. All zones will be routed through the Veeam PN Hub Server deployed into Azure via the Azure Marketplace. To go over the Veeam PN deployment process read my first post and also visit this VeeamKB that describes where to get the OVA and how to deploy and configure the appliance for first use.

Components

  • Veeam PN Hub Appliance x 1 (Azure)
  • Veeam PN Site Gateway x 3 (One Per Zettagrid vCD Zone)
  • OpenVPN Client (For remote connectivity)

Networking Overview and Requirements

  • Veeam PN Hub Appliance – Incoming Ports TCP/UDP 1194, 6179 and TCP 443
    • Azure VNET 10.0.0.0/16
    • Azure Veeam PN Endpoint IP and DNS Record
  • Veeam PN Site Gateways – Outgoing access to at least TCP/UDP 1194
    • Perth vCD Zone 192.168.60.0/24
    • Sydney vCD Zone 192.168.70.0/24
    • Melbourne vCD Zone 192.168.80.0/24
  • OpenVPN Client – Outgoing access to at least TCP/UDP 6179

In my setup the Veeam PN Hub Appliance has been deployed into Azure mainly because that’s where I was able to test out the product initially, but also because in theory it provides a centralised, highly available location for all the site-to-site connections to terminate into. This central Hub can be deployed anywhere and as long as it’s got HTTPS connectivity configured correctly to access the web interface and start to configure your site and standalone clients.

Configuring Site Clients for Cloud Zones (site-to-site):

To configuration the Veeam PN Site Gateway you need to register the sites from the Veeam PN Hub Appliance. When you register a client, Veeam PN generates a configuration file that contains VPN connection settings for the client. You must use the configuration file (downloadable as an XML) to set up the Site Gateway’s. Referencing the digram at the beginning of the post I needed to register three seperate client configurations as shown below.

Once this has been completed you need deploy a Veeam PN Site Gateway in each vCloud Hosting Zone…because we are dealing with an OVA the OVFTool will need to be used to upload the Veeam PN Site Gateway appliances. I’ve previously created and blogged about an OVFTool upload script using Powershell which can be viewed here. Each Site Gateway needs to be deployed and attached to the vCloud vORG Network that you want to extend…in my case it’s the 192.168.60.0, 192.168.70.0 and 192.168.80.0 vORG Networks.

Once each vCloud zone has has the Site Gateway deployed and the corresponding XML configuration file added you should see all sites connected in the Veeam PN Dashboard.

At this stage we have connected each vCloud Zone to the central Hub Appliance which is configured now to route to each subnet. If I was to connect up an OpenVPN Client to the HUB Appliance I could access all subnets and be able to connect to systems or services in each location. Shown below is the Tunnelblick OpenVPN Client connected to the HUB Appliance showing the injected routes into the network settings.

You can see above that the 192.168.60.0, 192.168.70.0 and 192.168.80.0 static routes have been added and set to use the tunnel interfaces default gateway which is on the central Hub Appliance.

Adding Static Routes to Cloud Zones (Cloud to Cloud to Cloud):

To complete the setup and have each vCloud zone talking to each other we need to configure static routes on each zone network gateway/router so that traffic destined for the other subnets knows to be routed through to the Site Gateway IP, through to the central Hub Appliance onto the destination and then back. To achieve this you just need to add static routes to the router. In my example I have added the static route to the vCloud Edge Gateway through the vCD Portal as shown below in the Melbourne Zone.

Conclusion:

Summerizing the steps that where taken in order to setup and configure the configuration of a cloud to cloud to cloud network using Veeam PN through its site-to-site connectivity feature to allow cross site connectivity while allowing access to systems and services via the point-to-site VPN:

  • Deploy and configure Veeam PN Hub Appliance
  • Register Cloud Sites
  • Register Endpoints
  • Deploy and configure Veeam PN Site Gateway in each vCloud Zone
  • Configure static routes in each vCloud Zone

Those five steps took me less than 30 minutes which also took into consideration the OVA deployments as well. At the end of the day I’ve connected three disparate cloud zones at Zettagrid which all access each other through a Veeam PN Hub Appliance deployed in Azure. From here there is nothing stopping me from adding more cloud zones that could be situated in AWS, IBM, Google or any other public cloud. I could even connect up my home office or a remote site to the central Hub to give full coverage.

The key here is that Veeam Power Network offers a simple solution to what is traditionally a complex and costly one. Again, this will not suit all use cases but at it’s most basic functional level, it would have been the answer to the cross cloud connectivity questions I used to get that I mentioned at the start of the article.

Go give it a try!

CPU Overallocation and Poor Network Performance in vCD – Beware of Resource Pools

For the longest time all VMware administrators have been told that resource pools are not folders and that they should only be used under circumstances where the impact of applying the resource settings is fully understood. From my point of view I’ve been able to utilize resource pools for VM management without too much hassle since I first started working on VMware Managed Service platforms and from a managed services point of view they are a lot easier to use as organizational “folders” than vSphere folders themselves. For me, as long as the CPU and Memory Resources Unlimited checkbox was ticked nothing bad happened.

Working with vCloud Director however, resource pools are heavily utilized as the control mechanism for resource allocation, sharing and management. It’s still a topic that can cause confusion when trying to wrap ones head around the different allocation models vCD offers. I still reference blog posts from Duncan Epping and Frank Denneman written nearly seven years ago to refresh my memory every now and then.

Before moving onto an example of how overallocation or client undersizing in vCloud Director can cause serious performance issues it’s worth having a read of this post by Frank that goes through in typical Frank detail around what resource management looks like in vCloud Director.

Proper Resource management is very complicated in a Virtual Infrastructure or vCloud environment. Each allocation models uses a different combination of resource allocation settings on both Resource Pool and Virtual Machine level

Undersized vDCs Causing Network Throughput Issue:

The Allocation Pool model was the one that I worked with the most and it used to throw up a few client related issues when I worked at Zetttagrid. When using the Allocation Pool method which is the default model you are specifying the amount of resources for your Org vDC and also specifying how much of these resources are guaranteed. The guarantee means that a reservation will be set and that the amount of guaranteed resources is taken from the Provider vDC. The total amount of resources specified is the upper boundary, which is also the resource pool limit.

Because tenants where able to purchase Virtual Datacenters of any size there was a number of occasions where the tenants undersized their resources. Specifically, one tenant came to us complaining about poor network performance during a copy operation between VMs in their vDC. At first the operations team thought that is was the network causing issues…we where also running NSX and these VMs where also on a VXLAN segment so fingers where being pointed there as well.

Eventually, after a bit of troubleshooting we where able to replicate the problem…it was related to the resources that the tenant had purchased or lack thereof. In a nutshell because the allocation pool model allows the over provisioning or resources not enough vCPU was purchased. The vDC resource pool had 1000Mhz of vCPU with a 0% reservation but he had created 4 dual vCPU VMs. When the network copy job started it consumed CPU which in turn exhausted the vCD CPU allocation.

What happened next can be seen in the video below…

With the resource pool constrained ready time is introduced to throttle the CPU which in turn impacts the network throughput. As shown in the video when the resource pool has the the unlimited button checked the ready goes away and the network throughput returns to normal.

Conclusion:

Again, its worth checking out the impact on the network throughput in the video as it clearly shows what happens what tenants underprovision or overallocate their Virtual Datacenters in vCloud Director. Outside of vCloud Director it’s also handy to understand the impact of applying reservations on Resource Pools in terms of VM compute and networking performance.

It’s not always the network!

References:

http://www.vmware.com/resources/techresources/10325

http://frankdenneman.nl/2010/09/24/provider-vdc-cluster-or-resource-pool/

http://www.yellow-bricks.com/2012/02/28/resource-pool-shares-dont-make-sense-with-vcloud-director/

https://kb.vmware.com/kb/2006684

Allocation Pool Organization vDC Changes in vCloud Director 5.1

Veeam DRaaS v10 Enhancements: vCloud Director Support!

Today at VeeamON 2017 we announced two very important enhancements to our DRaaS capabilities around Cloud Connect Replication and Tape Backup for our Veeam Cloud and Service Provider partners that help customer minimize the cost and reduce recovery times during a disaster. The press release can be found here, however as you could imagine I wanted to talk a little bit about the vCloud Director support.

A lot of service providers have been asking us to support vCloud Director in Veeam Cloud Connect Replication and I’m very happy to write that today we announced that v10 of Backup & Replication will have support for replica’s to be replicated and brought up into at service providers vCloud Director environment.

This is a significant enhancement to Cloud Connect replication end even with it being somewhat of a no brainer I am still sure it will make many VCSP people happy. With vCloud Director support in v10 tenants can now replace existing hardware plans with vCloud Director Virtual Datacenter resources. A tenant can either leverage an existing virtual datacenter or have the service provider create a dedicated one for the purpose of replication.

While Cloud Connect Replication was a strong product already with industry leading networking and ease of use, the flexibility that can be harnessed by tenants (and service providers) through the vCD platform means that there is even more control when a failover takes place. Look out for more information on our vCD integration as the v10 release gets closer…again for me, this is huge and bring’s together two of the best platforms for cloud based services even closer!

Worth a Repost: “VMware Doubles Down” vCloud Director 8.20

It seems that with the announcement last week that VMware was offloading vCloud Air to OVH people where again asking what is happening with vCloud Director….and the vCloud Air Network in general. While vCD is still not available for VMware’s enterprise customers, the vCloud Director platform has officially never been in a stronger position.

Those outside the vCAN inner circles probably are not aware of this and I still personally field a lot of questions about vCD and where it sits in regards to VMware’s plans. Apparently the vCloud Team has again sought to clear the air about vCloud Director’s future and posted this fairly emotive blog post overnight.

I’ve reposted part of the article below:

Blogger Blast: VMware vCloud Director 8.20

We are pleased to confirm that vCloud Director continues to be owned and developed by VMware’s Cloud Provider Software Business Unit and is the strategic cloud management platform for vCloud Air Network service providers. VMware has been and continues to be committed to its investment and innovation in vCloud Director.

With the recent release of vCloud Director 8.20 in February 2017 VMware has doubled down on its dedication to enhancing the product, and, in addition, is working to expand its training program to keep pace with the evolving needs of its users. In December 2016 we launched the Instructor Led Training for vCloud Director 8.10 (information and registration link) and in June 2017 we are pleased to be able to offer a Instructor Led Training program for vCloud Director 8.20.

Exciting progress is also occurring with vCloud Director’s expanding partner ecosystem. We are working to provide ISVs with streamlined access and certification to vCloud Director to provide service providers with access to more pre-certified capabilities with the ongoing new releases of vCloud Director. By extending our ecosystem service providers are able to more rapidly monetize services for their customers

Again, this is exciting times for those who are running vCloud Director SP and those looking to implement vCD into their IaaS offerings. It should be an interesting year and I look forward to VMware building on this renewed momentum for vCloud Director. There are many people blogging about vCD again which is awesome to see and it gives everyone in the vCloud Air Network an excellent content from which to leach from.

The vCloud Director Team also has a VMLive session that will provide a sneak peek at vCloud Director.Next roadmap. So if you are not a VMware Partner Central member and work for a vCloud Air Network provider wanting to know about where vCD is heading…sign up.

#LongLivevCD

Released: vCloud Director SP 8.20 with HTML5 Goodness!

This week, VMware released vCloud Director SP version 8.20 (build 5070630) which marks the 8th Major Release for vCloud Director since 1.0 was released in 2010. Ever since 2010 the user interface give or take a few minor modifications and additions has been the same. It also required flash and java which has been a pain point for a long time and in someways unfairly contributed towards a negative perception around vCD on a whole.  It’s been a long time coming but vCloud Director finally has a new web UI built on HTML5 however this new UI is only exposed when accessing the new NSX integration which is by far and away the biggest addition in this release.

This NSX integration has been in the works for a while now and has gone through a couple of iterations within the vCloud product team. Initially announced as Advanced Networking Services which was a decoupled implementation of NSX integration we now have a fully integrated solution that’s part of the vCloud Director installer. And while the UI additions only extend to NSX for the moment it’s brilliant to see what the development team have done with the Clarity UI (tbc). I’m going to take a closer look at the new NSX features in another post, but for the moment here are the release highlights of vCD SP 8.20.

New Features:

  • Advanced Edge Gateway and Distributed Firewall Configuration – This release introduces the vCloud Director Tenant Portal with an initial set of controls that you can use to configure Edge Gateways and NSX Distributed Firewalls in your organization.
  • New vCloud Director API for NSX – There is a new a proxy API that enables vCloud API clients to make requests to the NSX API. The vCloud Director API for NSX is designed to address NSX objects within the scope of a vCloud Director tenant organization.
  • Role Administration at the Organization Level – From this release role objects exist in each organization. System administrators can use the vCloud Director Web Console or the vCloud API to create roles in any organization. Organization administrators can use the vCloud API to create roles that are local to their organization.
  • Automatic Discovery and Import of vCenter VMs – Organization VDCs automatically discover vCenter VMs that exist in any resource pool that backs the vDC. A system administrator can use the vCloud API to specify vCetner resource pools for the vDC to adopt. vCenter VMs that exist in an adopted resource pool become available as discovered vApps in the new vDC.
  • Virtual Machine Host Affinity – A system administrator can create groups of VMs in a resource pool, then use VM-Host affinity rules to specify whether members of a VM group should be deployed on members of a vSphere host DRS Group.
  • Multi-Cell Upgrade – The upgrade utility now supports upgrading all the cells in your server group with a single operation.

You can see above that this release has some major new features that are more focused on tenant usability and allow more granular and segmented controls of networks, user access and VM discovery. The Automatic VM discovery and Import is a significant feature that goes along with the 8.10 feature of live VM imports and helps administrators import VM work loads into vCD from vCenter.

“VMware vCloud Director 8.20 is a significant release that adds enhanced functionality.  Fully integrating VMware NSX into the platform allows edge gateways and distributed firewalls to be easily configured via the new HTML5 interface.  Additional enhancements such as seamless cell upgrades and vCenter mapping illustrate VMware is committed to the platform and to vCloud Air Network partners.”

A list of known issues can be found in the release notes and i’d like to highlight the note around Virtual Machine memory for the vCD Cells…I had my NestedESXi lab instances crash due to memory pressures due to the fact the VMs where configured with only 5GB of RAM. vCloud Director SP 8.20 needs at least 6GB so ensure your cells are modified before you upgrade.

Well done the the vCloud Director Product and Development team for this significant release and I’ll look to dig into some of the new feature in detail in upcoming posts. You can also read the offical vCloud Blog release post here. I’m looking forward to what’s coming in the next release now…hopefully more functionality placed into the HTML5 UI and maybe integration with VMwareonAWS 😉

References:

http://pubs.vmware.com/Release_Notes/en/vcd/8-20/rel_notes_vcloud_director_8-20.html

https://www.vmware.com/support/pubs/vcd_sp_pubs.html

https://blogs.vmware.com/vcloud/2017/02/vmware-announces-general-availability-vcloud-director-8-20.html

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