Tag Archives: vCD

Veeam DRaaS v10 Enhancements: vCloud Director Support!

Today at VeeamON 2017 we announced two very important enhancements to our DRaaS capabilities around Cloud Connect Replication and Tape Backup for our Veeam Cloud and Service Provider partners that help customer minimize the cost and reduce recovery times during a disaster. The press release can be found here, however as you could imagine I wanted to talk a little bit about the vCloud Director support.

A lot of service providers have been asking us to support vCloud Director in Veeam Cloud Connect Replication and I’m very happy to write that today we announced that v10 of Backup & Replication will have support for replica’s to be replicated and brought up into at service providers vCloud Director environment.

This is a significant enhancement to Cloud Connect replication end even with it being somewhat of a no brainer I am still sure it will make many VCSP people happy. With vCloud Director support in v10 tenants can now replace existing hardware plans with vCloud Director Virtual Datacenter resources. A tenant can either leverage an existing virtual datacenter or have the service provider create a dedicated one for the purpose of replication.

While Cloud Connect Replication was a strong product already with industry leading networking and ease of use, the flexibility that can be harnessed by tenants (and service providers) through the vCD platform means that there is even more control when a failover takes place. Look out for more information on our vCD integration as the v10 release gets closer…again for me, this is huge and bring’s together two of the best platforms for cloud based services even closer!

Worth a Repost: “VMware Doubles Down” vCloud Director 8.20

It seems that with the announcement last week that VMware was offloading vCloud Air to OVH people where again asking what is happening with vCloud Director….and the vCloud Air Network in general. While vCD is still not available for VMware’s enterprise customers, the vCloud Director platform has officially never been in a stronger position.

Those outside the vCAN inner circles probably are not aware of this and I still personally field a lot of questions about vCD and where it sits in regards to VMware’s plans. Apparently the vCloud Team has again sought to clear the air about vCloud Director’s future and posted this fairly emotive blog post overnight.

I’ve reposted part of the article below:

Blogger Blast: VMware vCloud Director 8.20

We are pleased to confirm that vCloud Director continues to be owned and developed by VMware’s Cloud Provider Software Business Unit and is the strategic cloud management platform for vCloud Air Network service providers. VMware has been and continues to be committed to its investment and innovation in vCloud Director.

With the recent release of vCloud Director 8.20 in February 2017 VMware has doubled down on its dedication to enhancing the product, and, in addition, is working to expand its training program to keep pace with the evolving needs of its users. In December 2016 we launched the Instructor Led Training for vCloud Director 8.10 (information and registration link) and in June 2017 we are pleased to be able to offer a Instructor Led Training program for vCloud Director 8.20.

Exciting progress is also occurring with vCloud Director’s expanding partner ecosystem. We are working to provide ISVs with streamlined access and certification to vCloud Director to provide service providers with access to more pre-certified capabilities with the ongoing new releases of vCloud Director. By extending our ecosystem service providers are able to more rapidly monetize services for their customers

Again, this is exciting times for those who are running vCloud Director SP and those looking to implement vCD into their IaaS offerings. It should be an interesting year and I look forward to VMware building on this renewed momentum for vCloud Director. There are many people blogging about vCD again which is awesome to see and it gives everyone in the vCloud Air Network an excellent content from which to leach from.

The vCloud Director Team also has a VMLive session that will provide a sneak peek at vCloud Director.Next roadmap. So if you are not a VMware Partner Central member and work for a vCloud Air Network provider wanting to know about where vCD is heading…sign up.

#LongLivevCD

Released: vCloud Director SP 8.20 with HTML5 Goodness!

This week, VMware released vCloud Director SP version 8.20 (build 5070630) which marks the 8th Major Release for vCloud Director since 1.0 was released in 2010. Ever since 2010 the user interface give or take a few minor modifications and additions has been the same. It also required flash and java which has been a pain point for a long time and in someways unfairly contributed towards a negative perception around vCD on a whole.  It’s been a long time coming but vCloud Director finally has a new web UI built on HTML5 however this new UI is only exposed when accessing the new NSX integration which is by far and away the biggest addition in this release.

This NSX integration has been in the works for a while now and has gone through a couple of iterations within the vCloud product team. Initially announced as Advanced Networking Services which was a decoupled implementation of NSX integration we now have a fully integrated solution that’s part of the vCloud Director installer. And while the UI additions only extend to NSX for the moment it’s brilliant to see what the development team have done with the Clarity UI (tbc). I’m going to take a closer look at the new NSX features in another post, but for the moment here are the release highlights of vCD SP 8.20.

New Features:

  • Advanced Edge Gateway and Distributed Firewall Configuration – This release introduces the vCloud Director Tenant Portal with an initial set of controls that you can use to configure Edge Gateways and NSX Distributed Firewalls in your organization.
  • New vCloud Director API for NSX – There is a new a proxy API that enables vCloud API clients to make requests to the NSX API. The vCloud Director API for NSX is designed to address NSX objects within the scope of a vCloud Director tenant organization.
  • Role Administration at the Organization Level – From this release role objects exist in each organization. System administrators can use the vCloud Director Web Console or the vCloud API to create roles in any organization. Organization administrators can use the vCloud API to create roles that are local to their organization.
  • Automatic Discovery and Import of vCenter VMs – Organization VDCs automatically discover vCenter VMs that exist in any resource pool that backs the vDC. A system administrator can use the vCloud API to specify vCetner resource pools for the vDC to adopt. vCenter VMs that exist in an adopted resource pool become available as discovered vApps in the new vDC.
  • Virtual Machine Host Affinity – A system administrator can create groups of VMs in a resource pool, then use VM-Host affinity rules to specify whether members of a VM group should be deployed on members of a vSphere host DRS Group.
  • Multi-Cell Upgrade – The upgrade utility now supports upgrading all the cells in your server group with a single operation.

You can see above that this release has some major new features that are more focused on tenant usability and allow more granular and segmented controls of networks, user access and VM discovery. The Automatic VM discovery and Import is a significant feature that goes along with the 8.10 feature of live VM imports and helps administrators import VM work loads into vCD from vCenter.

“VMware vCloud Director 8.20 is a significant release that adds enhanced functionality.  Fully integrating VMware NSX into the platform allows edge gateways and distributed firewalls to be easily configured via the new HTML5 interface.  Additional enhancements such as seamless cell upgrades and vCenter mapping illustrate VMware is committed to the platform and to vCloud Air Network partners.”

A list of known issues can be found in the release notes and i’d like to highlight the note around Virtual Machine memory for the vCD Cells…I had my NestedESXi lab instances crash due to memory pressures due to the fact the VMs where configured with only 5GB of RAM. vCloud Director SP 8.20 needs at least 6GB so ensure your cells are modified before you upgrade.

Well done the the vCloud Director Product and Development team for this significant release and I’ll look to dig into some of the new feature in detail in upcoming posts. You can also read the offical vCloud Blog release post here. I’m looking forward to what’s coming in the next release now…hopefully more functionality placed into the HTML5 UI and maybe integration with VMwareonAWS 😉

References:

http://pubs.vmware.com/Release_Notes/en/vcd/8-20/rel_notes_vcloud_director_8-20.html

https://www.vmware.com/support/pubs/vcd_sp_pubs.html

https://blogs.vmware.com/vcloud/2017/02/vmware-announces-general-availability-vcloud-director-8-20.html

First Look: ManageIQ vCloud Director Orchestration

Welcome to 2017! To kick off the year I thought I’d do a quick post on a little known product (at least in my circles) from Red Hat Inc called ManageIQ. I stumbled across ManageIQ by chance having caught wind that they where soon to have vCloud Director support added to the product. Reading through some of the history behind ManageIQ I found out that in December of 2012 Red Hat acquired ManageIQ and integrated it into its CloudForms cloud management program…they then made it open source in 2014.

ManageIQ is the open source project behind Red Hat CloudForms. The latest product features are implemented in the upstream community first, before eventually making it downstream into Red Hat CloudForms. This process is similar for all Red Hat products. For example, Fedora is the upstream project for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and follows the same upstream-first development model.

CloudForms is a cloud management platform that also manages traditional server virtualization products such as vSphere and oVirt. This broad capability makes it ideal as a hybrid cloud manager as its able to manage both public clouds and on-premises private clouds and virtual infrastructures. This acts as a single management interface into hybrid environments that enables cross platform orchestration to be achieved with relative ease. This is backed by a community that contributes workflows and code to the project.

The supported platforms are shown below.

The October release was the first iteration for the vCloud provider which supports authentication, inventory (including vApps), provisioning, power operations and events all done via the use of the API provided by vCloud Director. First and foremost I see this as a client facing tool rather than an internal orchestration tool for vCAN SPs however given it can go cross platform there can be a use for VM or Container orchestration that SPs could tap into.

While it’s still relatively immature compared to the other platforms it supports, I see great potential in this and I think all vCAN Service Providers running vCloud Director should look at this as a way for their customers to better consume and operate vCD coming from a more modern approach, rather than depending on the UI.

Adding vCloud Director as a Cloud Provider:

Once the Appliance is deployed, head to Compute and Add New Cloud Provider. From the Type dropdown select VMware vCloud

Depending on which version of vCD SP your Service Provider is running, select the appropriate API Version. For vCD SP 8.x it should be vCloud API 9.0

Next add in the URL of the vCloud Director endpoint with it’s port…which is generally 443. For the username, you use the convention of [email protected] which allows you to login specifically to your vCD Organization. If you want to login at an admin enter in [email protected] to get top level access.

Once connected you can add as many vCD endpoints as you have. As you can see below I am connected to four seperate instances of vCloud.

Clicking through you get a Summary of the vCloud Zone with it’s relationships.

Clicking on the Instances you get a list of your VM’s, but this also has views for Virtual Datacenter, vApps and other vCD objects. As you can see below there is detailed views on the VM and it does have basic Power functions in this build.

I’ve just started to look into the power of CloudForms and have been reading through the ManageIQ automation guide. It’s one of those things that needs a little research plus some trial and error to master, but I see this form of cloud consumption where the end user doesn’t have to directly manipulate the various API endpoints as the future. I’m looking forward to how the vCloud Director provider matures and I’ll be keeping an eye on the forums and ManageIQ GitHub page for more examples.

Resources:

http://manageiq.org/docs/get-started/
http://manageiq.org/docs/reference/
https://pemcg.gitbooks.io/mastering-automation-in-cloudforms-and-manageiq/content/chapter1.html

OVFTool: vCloud Director OVA Upload PowerShell Script

Earlier this year I put together a quick and nasty PowerShell Script that exports a vApp from vCloud Director using the OVFTool …for those that don’t know the OVFTool is a command line tool that has a powerful set of functions to import/export VMs and vApps from vCenter, ESXi and vCloud Director weather it be from a vCloud Air or a vCloud Air Network Provider.

You can Download and install the tool from here:

This week I needed to upload an Virtual Machine that was in OVA format and for those that have worked with vCloud Director you would know that the OVA format is not supported using the upload functionality in the current web interface. With that I thought it was a good time to round out the export using OVTTool post with an import using OVFTool post. Again, doing some research I found a bunch of posts relating to importing OVAs into vCloud Director and after working through the Admin Guide and some examples I was ready to build out a basic import command and start work on the PowerShell Script. On Windows you can run the tool from CMD but I would suggest using PowerShell/CLI as in the example below I go through building a variable.

What Info is Required:

  • vCloud URL
  • vCloud Username and Password
  • Org Name
  • vDC Name
  • vApp Name
  • Catalog Name
  • Path to OVA

Command Line Example:

Below is a basic example of how to construct the vCloud String and use it as a variable to execute the tool.

PowerShell Script:

Again, I’ve taken it a step further to make it easier for people to import OVAs into vCloud Director and put together another, slightly improved PowerShell Script that I have coded in to work with my old companies vCloud Zones…though this can be easily modified to use any vCloud Air Network vCD endpoint.

The output of the script can be seen below:

It’s a very basic script that gathers all the required components that make up the vCloud Source Connection String and then exports the OVA into the vCD vApp. I’ve even done a little more PowerShell improvements around password security and added a little colour.

Save the code snippet as a .ps1 into the OFVTool Windows Folder and execute the script from the same location. If there are any errors with the inputs provided the OVFTool will fail with an error, but apart from that it’s a very simple straight forward way to import OVAs into any vCloud Director enabled endpoint.

Additional Reading:

http://www.virtuallyghetto.com/tag/ovftool

http://www.vmwarebits.com/content/import-and-export-virtual-machines-command-line-vmwares-ovf-tool 

vCloud Director SP 8.10.1 UI Additions – Boot Options

Last week VMware released vCloud Director SP 8.10.1 Build 4655197 and while it was mainly a patch release there was one new feature added which was a couple of additional UI settings under the General Tab of a Virtual Machine.

  • New boot customization options added to delay the boot time and to enter into the BIOS setup screen. You can use the vCloud Director Web console or the vCloud API to set Boot Delay and EnterBIOS mode options.

This might seem like a small and meaningless setting, but you would be surprised how many times I experienced customers frustrated at the fact they could not get into the BIOS easily via the VM Console or have a long enough boot delay to trigger a boot from alternative media option.

The previous General Tab looked like this:

The 8.10.1 General Tab looks like this:

You can see that you now have an check box to Enter BIOS Setup and set the Boot Delay. These settings follow the rules of vSphere meaning the Boot delay is in milliseconds and can only be modified if the Virtual Machine is powered off. I had this image open with the System Administrator account which explains why you see the a few more VM related bits of information telling you what Host and Datastore the VM is residing on and what the name of the VM is in vSphere.

Again, this is a simple but extremely useful addition but continues to show VMware’s commitment to improving the vCD platform even before the big UI enhancements start to filter through next year.

#LongLivevCD

Worth a Repost: Debunking Three Common Myths Around vCloud Director #LongLivevCD

It seems that all with all the announcements of late around VMware’s (re)shifting Hybrid Cloud strategy with Cross Cloud Foundation and VMware’s partnership with AWS people where again asking what is happening with vCloud Director. While vCD is still not available for VMware’s enterprise customers, the vCloud Director platform has officially never been in a stronger position. Those who where lucky to attend the various product team NDA and SIG sessions at VMworld US and Europe have an idea of not only whats coming…but also that there has been a serious ramp up in focus and development.

Those outside the vCAN inner circles probably didn’t know this and I still personally field a lot of questions about vCD and where it sits in regards to VMware’s plans. Apparently the vCloud Team has sought to clear the air about vCloud Director’s future and posted this fairly emotive blog post overnight. I’ve reposted the article below:

MythBusters: Debunking Three Common Myths Around vCloud Director

For while now, there’s been some speculation that VMware vCloud Director was no longer a priority for VMware – but that couldn’t be further from the truth. With the release of vCloud Director 8.10 this spring, VMware has doubled down on its dedication to enhancing the product, and we’ve even expanded our training program to keep pace with the evolving needs of its users.

Make no mistake, vCloud Director fits into VMware’s larger vision for the software defined data center (SDDC) now more than ever before. So let’s take the time to clear up a few of the biggest misconceptions out there today.

  • MYTH #1 – vCloud Director is End-of-Life or End-of-Support: Not at all! In May 2016, VMware released vCloud Director 8.10, the latest version of the product, in response to customer feedback and an industry-wide move to the hybrid cloud. New features in this release includes distributed resource scheduler affinity and anti-affinity for VMs and UI integration of NSX for heightened security. To get customers up to speed with the new release, our team has launched a free vCloud Director 8.10 Fundamentals eLearning course, and after VMworld Europe, we plan to expand these offerings through new vCloud Director Hands-on Labs via the VMware HOL Online portal. Later this month, we are also offering an extensive 5-day lab from October 31 – November 4, titled “vCloud Director 8.10: Install, Configure, Manage” that walks participants through the process of building a data center environment that leverages not only vCloud Director but also Virtual SAN and NSX.
  • MYTH #2 – Usage is Lagging: False! In fact, the opposite is true. Not only is usage of vCloud Director increasing, but it’s reaching new levels of growth.Look no further than Zettagrid, a cloud computing infrastructure as a service (IaaS) provider, which deployed vCloud Director to simplify data center provisioning. Or iland, an award-winning enterprise cloud infrastructure provider that uses vCloud Director to supply greater flexibility and customization to its clients. Furthermore, VMware continues to partner with members of its independent software vendor program group to catalogue and support the most recent products built by ISVs that are compatible with VCD through it through the VMware solution exchange. vCloud Director has proven itself a valued partner for customers across industries and hybrid cloud ecosystems, and version 8.10 only solidifies VMware’s continued commitment to the product and its users.
  • MYTH #3 – User Interface (UI) is Static: Wrong again. You spoke, and we listened. A change in direction from previous versions, the release of vCloud Director 8.10 demonstrated a commitment to the UI by exposing all features directly through the UI and achieving feature parity with the API. Features now available on the UI include storage profiling, tenant throttling, and self-service VDC templates that give vCloud Director a more robust and flexible platform for delivering IaaS solutions.

Through a combination feature updates that increase agility, new training opportunities, and an enhanced UI with heightened functionality, VMware continues to actively invest in the vCloud Director user experience. Rest assured, there’s more to come.

So overall, that’s a pretty blunt message from the vCloud Director SP Product team that..for the foreseeable future vCloud Director is here to stay and continue to be improved upon. Again, I’ll state with absolute fact that there is no more stable and mature multi-tenant cloud management platform in the market today for IaaS. Look out for the next BETA release and also for Alliance partners like Veeam building even stronger offerings on top of vCloud Director.

Rest assured, there’s more to come.

References:

MythBusters: Debunking Three Common Myths Around vCloud Director

 

vCD SP 8.10 New Features Part 3 – Storage Tiering and Storage Management

vCloud Director SP 8.10 has been out for a couple months now and the general buzz around this release has been extremely positive. The decision to expose the previously API only features has been warmly welcomed by most vCloud Air Network Service Providers and I have heard of quiet a few looking to deploy or plan deployment of vCD SP 8.10 into their hosting platforms.

In Part One I went through the new NSX supportability improvements and in Part Two I went through the tenant ability to configure VM affinity and anti-affinity rules. In Part Three I am going to go through something that’s been available via the API since vCD 5.6.3 SP but is now exposed via the UI and also take a look at a new feature around the limiting of the max size of a tenant VMDKs in a vCD environment.

  • VM Disk Level Storage Profiles – Allows a single virtual machine (VM) to access different tiers of storage such as storage area network (SAN), network-attached storage (NAS), and local storage to help balance storage cost vs. storage performance. VMware vCloud Director 5.6 also supports VMware Virtual SAN.

Fast Provisioning:

Before showing the new UI Storage Profile features it’s worth mentioning that this will not work if you have vDCs configured with fast provisioning enabled. If you try to configure multiple profiles against a VM you will get a “Cannot use multiple storage profiles in a fast-provisioned VDC” error message.

Fast provisioning was introduced with vCloud Director 1.5 and enables speeding up a cloning process when deploying vApps from catalog or copying VMs. It utilizes vSphere linked clones where the base image is not cloned, instead a delta disk is created to record changed blocks.

Great in theory, but also carries some caveats…not allowing VM Disk level storage profiles being one of them. If turned on, head to the Storage Tab of the vDC and uncheck the option as shown below.

VM Disk Level Storage Profiles:

There isn’t a lot that needs explaining in terms of what can now be achieved through the UI to better provision and manage different storage requirements on a per VM disk basis. vCD Storage Profiles directly plug into vCenter Storage Policies and inherit the characteristics passed through from vCenter into vCD via the Provider vDC. These are then allocated to vDCs as shown in the image above. Generally speaking these policies map back to different tiers of storage and allow the Service Provider to offering different service levels at different price points.

As an example a tenant may have a requirement to have a large file server that doubles as a Domain Controller (it happens more than you think) for the System drive the requirements might state that you need SAS backed storage and SATA backed for a secondary volume. This can now be achieved through the vCD UI as shown below.

You can see above that Disk 0 is on ioSTOR-500 and Disk 1 is on ioSTOR-250. The example above is for the adding of new disks to a VM…you can also change the Storage Profile while a VM is on. This will trigger a Storage vMotion in the background if required as shown below.

Limiting Maximum Disk Size:

There are some scenarios where a Service Providers might want to limit the max size of tenant VMDKs in order to comply with capacity planning requirements or storage level constraints. The current max size for a VMDK in vSphere is 62TB and being realistic there are not too many Service Providers out there who provision datastores that size. Typically, the storage limits applied at an allocation pool should limit the creation of stupidly large disks by tenants, but there is the possibility that someone with deep pockets purchasing large amounts of storage could try to provision a VM (thin or not) Disk larger than the datastores underpinning the storage policy.

To set the global disk limit you use the cell-management-tool command on any vCD cell in the instance. Once run the value is honors immediately and without restart of the vCD services as shown in the example below that limits the disks to 500GB.

./cell-management-tool manage-config -n vmlimits.disk.capacity.maxMb -v 500000

Once configured, if a tenant tries to provision a disk bigger than the limit they will get an error stating that the “Requested disk size exceeds maximum allowed capacity“.

References:

https://fojta.wordpress.com/tag/fast-provisioning/

http://pubs.vmware.com/Release_Notes/en/vcd/8-10/rel_notes_vcloud_director_8-10.html

Sneak Peek – Veeam 9.5 vCloud Director Self Service Portal

Last month Veeam announced that they had significantly enhanced the capabilities around the backup and recovery of vCloud Director. This will give vCloud Air Network Service Providers the ability to tap into a new set of RESTful APIs that adds tenanted, self service capabilities and be able to offer a more complete service that is totally controlled and managed by the vCloud tenant.

As part of the Veeam Vanguard program, I have been given access to an early beta of Veeam v9.5 and have had a chance to take the new functionality for a spin. Given the fact this is an very early beta of v9.5 I was surprised to see that the installation and configuration of the vCloud Director Self Service functionality was straight forward and like most things with Veeam…It just worked.

NOTE: The following is based on an early access BETA and as such features, functions and menu items are subject to change.

Basic Overview:

The new vCloud Director integration lets you back up and restore single VMs, vApps, Organization vDC and whole Organization. This is all done via a web UI based on Veeam Backup Enterprise Manager. Only vCD SP versions are compatible with the feature. Tenants have access to Self-Service web portal where they can manage their vCloud Director jobs, as well as restore VMs, files and application items within their vCloud Director organization.

The Service Provider exposes the following URL to vCD tenants:

https://Enterprise-Manager-IP/vcloud/OrgName:9443

As shown in the diagram below Enterprise Manager than talks to the vCloud Director Cells to authenticate the tenant and retrieve information relating to the tenant vCloud Organization.

Configuring a Tenant Job:

Anyone who is familiar with Veeam will recognize the steps below and the familiar look of the menu options that the Self Service Portal provides. As shown below the landing page once the tenant has authenticated is similar to what you see when logging into Enterprise Manager…in fact the beauty of this portal is that Veeam didn’t have to reinvent the wheel…they just retrofited vCD multi-tenancy into the views.

To configure a job click on the the Jobs Tab and hit the Create Button.

Give the Job a Name and set the number of restore points to keep.

Next select the VMs you want to add to the Job. As mentioned above you can add the whole Org, vDC, vApp and as granular as per VM.

Next select any Guest Processing you want done for Application Aware backups.

And then set the Job Schedule to you liking.

Finally configure email notification

Once that has been done you have the option to Run the Job manually or wait for the schedule to kick in. As you can see below you have a lot of control over the backup job and you can even start Active Full Jobs.

Once a job has been triggered you have access to view logs on what is happening during the backup process. The details is just as you would expect from the Veeam Backup & Recovery Console and keeps tenant’s informed as to the status of their jobs.

More to Come:

There is a lot more that I could post but for the moment I will leave you all with that first sneak peak. Once again Veeam have come to the party in a big way with this feature and every service provider who run vCloud Director should be looking at Veeam 9.5 so as to enhance the value of their IaaS offering.

#LongLivevCD

Quick Post: VLAN Trunking with vCloud Director

This week one of our Vitualisation Engineer’s (James Smith) was trying to come up with a solution for a client that wanted the flexibility to bring in his own VLANs mapped into our vCloud networking stack. We get this request quiet often and we generally configure a one to one relationship between the VLAN being mapped externally to our networking stack and then brought into vCD via a externally connected vORG Network.

As you all know you can configure an ESXi Portgroup either with no VLAN, a single VLAN, multiple VLANs or Private VLANs. In this case the customer wanted preconfigured VLANS as part of the one Portgroup so taking vCloud Director out of play we would configure the Portgroup as follows:

This allows for the tagging of the VLAN at the GuestOS level while allowing those VMs to be on the same Portgroup. The problem arises when you then try to create the External Network in vCloud Director. As shown below vCloud Director looks at the Portgroup, sees the multiple VLANs and marks it down at VLAN 4095.

Regardless of the fact that it’s picked up as VLAN 4095 which wouldn’t be ideal even if we had configured the Portgroup with 4095 you can’t finish off the configuration of the External Network as vCD throws the error seen below.

Another cryptic error from vCD, but in a nutshell it’s telling you that 4095 is in use and the network can’t be created meaning you won’t be able to tie any vORG Network to the ESXi Portgroup. There is a VMwareKB that relates to this error, however searching through the vCD database shows that 4095 isn’t in use as is expected. So it would appear that this is a default vCD behaviour in dealing with a Portgroup configured with multiple VLANs.

Workaround:

We eventually came up with a workaround for this that isn’t 100% fool proof and should be undertaken with the understanding that you could cause issues if VLANs are not managed and noted down on some configuration database. What we did was go back an modify the Portgroup to only have one VLAN. This allows us to create the External Network in vCD and from there create the vORG Network.

From there we go back and edit the Portgroup to make it a trunk as we had it initially. vCD will now show the External Network still created with VLAN 4095 listed as shown below.

From here you can create VMs in vCD, connect them up to the vORG Network and use VLAN tagging in the Guest OS to pass the correct network traffic through. Again just be wary that vCD doesn’t recognize the VLANs being trunked and there is a possibility a duplicate VLAN could be assigned via another External Network.

As a side note, I’ll be chasing this up with the vCloud Director Product team as I believe it should be an option that is allowed…even though VXLAN is taking over there is still a need to cater for traditional VLAN configurations.

References:

https://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2003988

http://www.virtualbrigade.com/2014/08/what-is-vlan-id-4095-when-is-it-used.html

Multiple VLANs for an External network in vCloud? from vmware

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