Tag Archives: AWS

VMware Cloud on AWS: Thoughts One Year On

Last week at VMworld 2017 in the US, VMware announced the initial availability of VMware Cloud on AWS. It was the focal point for VMware at the event and probably the most important strategic play that VMware has undertaken in it’s history. This partnership was officially announced at last year’s VMworld and at the time I wrote a couple of blog posts commenting on the potential impact to the then, vCloud Air Network (now VCPP) and what needed to be done to empower the network.

As you can imagine at the time, I was a little skeptical about the announcement, but since that time we have seen the fall of vCloud Air to OVH and a doubling down of the efforts around enhancing vCloud Director and general support for the VMware Cloud Provider Program. Put this together with me stepping out of my role within the VCPP to one that is on the outside supporting it I feel that VMware Cloud on AWS is good for VMware and also good for service providers.

What It Looks Like:

This time last year we didn’t know exactly what VMC would look like apart from using vSphere, NSX and vSAN as it’s compute, networking and storage platforms or how exactly it would work on top of AWS’s infrastructure. For a detailed look under the hood, Frank Denneman has published a Technical Overview which is worth a read. A lot of credit needs to go to the engineering teams at both ends for achieving what they have achieved within a relatively small period of time.

The key thing to point out is the default compute and storage that’s included as part of the service. Four ESXi hosts will have dual E5-2686 v4 CPUs @2.3GHz with 18 Cores and 512GB of RAM. Storage wise there will be 10TB raw of All Flash vSAN per host, meaning depending on the FTT of vSAN a usable minimum of 20TB. The scale-out model enables expansion to up to 16 hosts, resulting in 576 CPU cores and 8TB of memory which is insane!

What does is Cost:

Here is where is starts to get interesting for me. Pricing wasn’t discussed during the Keynotes or in the announcements but looking at the pricing page here you can see what this base cluster will cost you. It’s going to cost $8.37 USD per host per hour for the on-demand option, which is the only option until VMware launches one year and three year reserved instances in the future where there looks to be a thirty and fifty percent saving respectively.

Upon first glance this seems expensive…however it’s only expensive in relative terms because there is the default resources that come the service. You can’t get anything less than the four hosts with all the trimmings at the moment which, when taken into consideration might lock out non enterprise companies from taking the service up.

Unless pricing changes by way of offering a smaller resource footprint I can see this not being attractive in other regions like ANZ or EMEA where small to medium size enterprises are more common. This is where VCPP service providers can still remain competitive and continue to offer services around the same building blocks as VMC on their own platforms.

CloudPhysics have an interesting blog post here, on some cost analytics that they ran.

How Can it be Leveraged:

With Veeam being a launch partner with VMware Cloud on AWS offering availability services it got me thinking as to how the service could be leveraged by service providers. A few things need to fall into place from a technology point of view but I believe that one of the best potential use cases for VMC is for service providers to leverage it for failover, replication and disaster recovery scenarios.

The fact that there this service posses auto-scaling of hosts means that it has the potential to be used as a resource cluster for disaster recovery services. If I think about Cloud Connect Replication, one of the hardest things to get right as a provider is sizing the failover resources and the procurement of the compute and storage to deal with customer requirements. As long as the base resources are covered the auto scaling capabilities mean that service providers only need to cover the base resources and pay any additional costs if a failover event happens and exceed the default cluster resources.

It must be pointed out that Cloud Connect can’t use a VMC cluster as a target at the moment due to the networking used…that is VXLAN on top of AWS VPN networking.

As I wrote last year, I feel like there is a great opportunity for service providers to leverage VMC as vCloud Director provider clusters however I know that this currently isn’t being supported by VMware. I honestly feel that service providers would love the ability to have cloud based Provider vDCs available across the world and I’m hoping that VMware realise the potential and allow vCloud Director to connect and consume VMC.

VMworld End of Show Report on VMware Cloud on AWS:

References:

https://www.vmware.com/company/news/releases/vmw-newsfeed.VMware-and-AWS-Announce-Initial-Availability-of-VMware-Cloud-on-AWS.2184706.html

https://cloud.vmware.com/vmc-aws

https://www.crn.com.au/news/pricing-revealed-for-vmware-cloud-on-aws-472011

VMware Cloud on AWS Availability with Veeam

It’s been exactly a year since VMware announced their partnership with AWS and it’s no surprise that at this year’s VMworld the solution is front and center and will feature heavily at Monday’s keynote. Earlier today Veeam was announced as an officially supported backup, recovery and replication platform for VMware Cloud on AWS. This is an exciting announcement for existing customers of Veeam who currently use vSphere and are interesting in consuming VMware Cloud on AWS.

In terms of what Veeam has been able to achieve, there is little noticeable difference in the process to configure and run backup or replication jobs from within Veeam Backup & Replication. The VMware Cloud on AWS resources are treated as just another cluster so most actions and features of the core platform work as if the cloud based cluster was local or otherwise.

Below you can see a screen shot of an VMC vCenter from the AWS based HTML5 Web Client. What you can see if the minimum spec for a VMC customer which includes four hosts with 36 cores and 512GB of RAM, plus vSAN and NSX.

In terms of Veeam making this work, there were a few limitations that VMware have placed on the solution which means that our NFS based features such as Instant VM Recovery, Virtual Labs or Surebackups won’t work at this stage. HotAdd mode is the only supported backup transport mode (which isn’t a bad thing as it’s my preferred transport mode) which talks to a new VDDK library that is part of the VMC platform.

With that the following features work out of the box:

  • Backup with In Guest Processing
  • Restores to original or new locations
  • Backup Copy Jobs
  • Replication
  • Cloud Connect Backup
  • Windows File Level Recovery
  • Veeam Explorers

With the above there are a lot of options for VMC customers to stick to the 3-2-1 rule of backups…remembering that just because the compute resources are in AWS, doesn’t mean that they are highly valuable from a workload and application availability standpoint. Customers can also take advantage of the fact that VMC is just another cluster from their on-premises deployments and use Veeam Backup & Replication to replicate VMs into the VMC vCenter to which end it could be used as a DR site.

For more information and the offical blog post from Veeam co-CEO Peter McKay click here.

Looking Beyond the Hyper-Scaler Clouds – Don’t Forget the Little Guys!

I’ve been on the road over the past couple of weeks presenting to Veeam’s VCSP partners and prospective partners here in Australia and New Zealand on Veeam’s Cloud Business. Apart from the great feedback in response to what Veeam is doing by way of our cloud story I’ve had good conversations around public cloud and infrastructure providers verses the likes of Azure or AWS. Coming from my background working for smaller, but very successful service providers I found it almost astonishing that smaller resellers and MSPs seem to be leveraging the hyper-scale clouds without giving the smaller providers a look in.

On the one hand, I understand why people would choose to look to Azure, AWS and alike to run their client services…while on the other hand I believe that the marketing power of the hyper-scalers has left the capabilities and reputation of smaller providers short changed. You only need to look at last week’s AWS outage and previous Azure outages to understand that no cloud is immune to outages and it’s misjudged to assume that the hyper-scalers offer any better reliability or uptime than the likes of providers in the vCloud Air Network or other IaaS providers out there.

That said, there is no doubt that the scale and brain power that sits behind the hyper-scalers ensures a level of service and reliability that some smaller providers will struggle to match, but as was the case last week…the bigger they are, the harder they fall. The other things that comes with scale is the ability to drive down prices and again, there seems to be a misconception that the hyper-scalers are cheaper than smaller service providers. In fact most of the conversations I had last week as to why Azure or AWS was chosen was down to pricing and kickbacks. Certainly in Azure’s case, Microsoft has thrown a lot into ensuring customers on EAs have enough free service credits to ensure uptake and there are apparently nice sign-up bonuses that they offer to partners.

During that conversation, I asked the reseller why they hadn’t looked at some of the local VCSP/vCAN providers as options for hosting their Veeam infrastructure for clients to backup workloads to. Their response was, that it was never a consideration due to Microsoft being…well…Microsoft. The marketing juggernaut was too strong…the kickbacks too attractive. After talking to him for a few minutes I convinced him to take a look at the local providers who offer, in my opinion more flexible and more diverse service offerings for the use case.

Not surprisingly, in most cases money is the number one factor in a lot of these decisions with service uptime and reliability coming in as an important afterthought…but an afterthought non-the less. I’ve already written about service uptime and reliability in regards to cloud outages before but the main point of this post is to highlight that resellers and MSP’s can make as much money…if not more, with smaller service providers. It’s common now for service providers to offer partner reseller or channel programs that ensure the partner gets decent recurring revenue streams from the services consumed and the more consumed the more you make by way of program level incentives.

I’m not going to do the sums, because there is so much variation in the different programs but those reading who have not considered using smaller providers over the likes of Azure or AWS I would encourage to look through the VCSP Service Provider directory and the vCloud Air Network directory and locate local providers. From there, enquire about their partner reseller or channel programs…there is money to be made. Veeam (and VMware with the vCAN) put a lot of trust and effort into our VCSPs and having worked for some of the best and know of a lot of other service provider offerings I can tell you that if you are not looking at them as a viable option for your cloud services then you are not doing yourself justice.

The cloud hyper-scalers are far from the panacea they claim to be…if anything, it’s worthwhile spreading your workloads across multiple clouds to ensure the best availability experience for your clients…however, don’t forget the little guys!

VMware on AWS: vCloud Director and What Needs to be Done to Empower the vCAN

Last week VMware and Amazon Web Services officially announced their new joint venture whereby VMware technology will be available to run as a service on AWS in the form of bare-bones hardware with vCenter, ESXi, NSX and VSAN as the core VMware technology components. This isn’t some magic whereby ESXi is nested or emulated upon the existing AWS platform, but a fully fledged dedicated virtual datacenter offering that clients can buy through VMware and have VMware manage the stack right up to the core vCenter components.

Earlier in the week I wrote down some thoughts around the possible impact to the vCloud Air Network this new offering could have. While at first glance it would appear that I was largely negative towards the announcement, after having a think about the possible implications I started to think about how this could be advantageous for the vCloud Air Network. What it comes down to is how much VMware was to open up the API’s for all components hosted on AWS and how the vCloud Director SP product team develops around those API’s.

From there it will be on vCloud Air Network partners that have the capabilities to tap into the VMC’s. I believe there is an opportunity here for vCAN Service Providers to go beyond offering just IaaS and combine their offerings with the VMware AWS offering as well as help extend out to offer AWS PaaS without the worry that traditional VM workloads will be migrated to AWS.

For this to happen though VMware have to do something they haven’t done in the past…that is, commit to making sure vCAN providers can cash in on the opportunity and be empowered by the opportunity to grow VMware based services… as I mentioned in my original post:

In truth VMware have been very slow…almost reluctant to pass over features that would allow this cross cloud compatibility and migration be even more of a weapon for the vCAN by holding back on features that allowed on-premises vCenter and Workstation/Fusion connect directly to vCloud Air endpoints in products such as Hybrid Cloud Manager. I strongly believed that those products should have been extended from day zero to have the ability to connect to any vCloud Director endpoint…it wasn’t a stretch for that to occure as it is effectively the same endpoint but for some reason it was strategically labeled as a “coming soon” feature.

Extending vCloud Director SP:

I have taken liberty to extend the VMWonAWS graphic to include what I believe should be the final puzzle in what would make the partnership sit well with existing vCloud Air Network providers…that is, allow vCloud Director SP to bridge the gap between the on-premises compute, networking and storage and the AWS based VMware platform infrastructure.

vCloud Director is a cloud management platform that abstracts physical resources from vCenter and interacts with NSX to build out networking resources via the NSX Manager API’s…with that it’s not hard in my eyes to allow any exposed vCenter or NSX Manager to be consumed by vCloud Director.

With that allowed, any AWS vCenter dedicated instance can become a Virtual Datacenter object in vCloud Director and consumed by an organisation. For vCloud Air Network partners who have the ability to programatically interact with the vCloud Director APIs, this all of a sudden could open up another 70+ AWS locations on which to allow their customers to deploy Virtual Datacenters.

Take that one step further and allow vCD to overlay on-premises compute and networking resources and then allow connectivity between all locations via NSX hybridity and you have a seriously rock solid solution that extends a customer on-premises to a more conveniently placed (remember AWS isn’t everywhere) vCloud Air Network platform that can in turn consume/burst into a VMware Dedicated instance on AWS and you now have something that rivals the much hyped Hybrid Cloud Strategy of Microsoft and the Azure Stack.

What Needs to Happen:

It’s pretty simple…VMware need to commit to continued/accelerated development of vCloud Director SP (which has already begun in earnest) and give vCloud Air Network providers the ability to consume both ways…on-premises and on VMware’s AWS platform. VMware need to grant this capability to vCloud Air Network providers from the outset and not play the stalling game that was apparent when it came to feature parity with vCloud Air.

What I have envisioned isn’t far off becoming a reality…vCloud Director is mature and extensible enough to do what I have described above, and I believe that in my recent dealings with the vCloud Director product and marketing teams at VMworld US earlier this year that there is real belief in the team that the cloud management platform will continue to improve and evolve…if VMware allow it to.

Further improving on vCloud Directors maturity and extensibility, if the much maligned UI is improved as promised…with the upcoming addition of full NSX integration completing the network stack, the next step in greater adoption beyond the 300 odd vCAN SPs currently use vCloud Director needs a hook…and that hook should be VMWonAWS.

Time will tell…but there is huge potential here. VMware need to deliver to their partners in order to have that VMWonAWS potential realised.

 

VMware on AWS: Thoughts on the Impact to the vCloud Air Network

Last week VMware and Amazon Web Services officially announced their new joint venture whereby VMware technology will be available to run as a service on AWS in the form of bare-bones hardware with vCenter, ESXi, NSX and VSAN as the core VMware technology components. This isn’t some magic whereby ESXi is nested or emulated upon the existing AWS platform, but a fully fledged dedicated virtual datacenter offering that clients can buy through VMware and have VMware manage the stack right up to the core vCenter components.

Note: These initial opinions are just that. There has been a fair bit of Twitter reaction over the announcement, with the majority being somewhat negative towards the VMware strategy. There are a lot of smart guys working on this within VMware and that means it’s got technical focus, not just Exec/Board strategy. There is also a lot of time between this initial announcement and it’s release first release in 2017 however initial perception and reaction to a massive shift in direction should and will generate debate…this is my take from a vCAN point of view.

The key service benefits as taken from the AWS/VMware landing page can be seen below:

Let me start by saying that this is a huge huge deal and can not be underestimated in terms of it’s significance. If I take my vCAN hat off, I can see how and why this was necessary for both parties to help each other fight off the growing challenge from Microsoft’s Azure offering and the upcoming Azure Stack. For AWS, it lets them tap into the enterprise market where they say they have been doing well…though in reality, it’s known that they aren’t doing as well as they had hoped. While for VMware, it helps them look serious about offering a public cloud that is truly hyper-scale and also looks at protecting existing VMware workloads from being moved over to Azure…and to a lesser extent AWS directly.

There is a common enemy here, and to be fair to Microsoft it’s obvious that their own shift in focus and direction has been working and the industry is taking note.

Erasing vCloud Air and The vCAN Impact:

For VMware especially, it can and should erase the absolute disaster that was vCloud Air… Looking back at how the vCloud Air project transpired the best thing to come out of it was the refocus in 2015 of VMware to prop back up the vCloud Air Network, which before that had been looking shaky with the vCANs strongest weapon, vCloud Director, being pushed to the side and it’s future uncertain. In the last twelve months there has an been apparent recommitment to vCloud Director and the vCAN and things had been looking good…however that could be under threat with this announcement…and for me, perception is everything!

Public Show of Focus and Direction:

Have a listen to the CNBC segment embedded above where Pat Gelsinger and AWS CEO Andy Jassy discuss the partnership. Though I wouldn’t expect them to mention the 4000+ strong vCloud Air Network (or the recent partnership with IBM for that matter) the fact that they are openly discussing about the unique industry first benefits the VMWonAWS partnership brings to the market, in the same breath they ignore or put aside the fact that the single biggest advantage that the vCloud Air Network had was VMware workload mobility.

Complete VMware Compatibility:

VMware Cloud on AWS will provide VMware customers with full VM compatibility and seamless workload portability between their on-premises infrastructure and the AWS Cloud without the need for any workload modifications or retooling.

Workload Migration:

VMware Cloud on AWS works seamlessly with vSphere vMotion, allowing you to move running virtual machines from on-premises infrastructure to the AWS Cloud without any downtime. The virtual machines retain network identity and connections, ensuring a seamless migration experience.

The above features are pretty much the biggest weapons that vCloud Air Network partners had in the fight against existing or potential client moving or choosing AWS over their own VMware based platform…and from direct experience, I know that this advantage is massive and does work. With this advantage taken away, vCAN Service Providers may start to loose workloads to AWS at a faster clip than what was done previously.

In truth VMware have been very slow…almost reluctant to pass over features that would allow this cross cloud compatibility and migration be even more of a weapon for the vCAN by holding back on features that allowed on-premises vCenter and Workstation/Fusion connect directly to vCloud Air endpoints in products such as Hybrid Cloud Manager. I strongly believed that those products should have been extended from day zero to have the ability to connect to any vCloud Director endpoint…it wasn’t a stretch for that to occure as it is effectively the same endpoint but for some reason it was strategically labeled as a “coming soon” feature.

VMware Access to Multiple AWS Regions:

VMware Virtual Machines running on AWS can leverage over 70 AWS services covering compute, storage, database, security, analytics, mobile, and IoT. With VMware Cloud on AWS, customers will be able to leverage their existing investment in VMware licenses through customer loyalty programs.

I had mentioned on Twitter that the image below was both awesome and scary mainly because all I think about when I look at it is the overlay of the vCloud Air Network and how VMware actively promote 4000+ vCAN partners contributing to existing VMware customers in being able to leverage their existing investments on vCloud Air Network platforms.

Look familiar?

 

In truth of those 4000+ vCloud Air Network providers there are maybe 300 that are using vCloud Director in some shape or form and of those an even smaller amount that can programatically take advantage of automated provisioning and self service. There in lies one of the biggest issues for the vCAN…while some IaaS providers excel, the majority offer services that can’t stack up next to the hyper-scalers. Because of that, I don’t begrudge VMware to forgetting about the capabilities of the vCAN, but as mentioned above, I believe more could, and still can be been done to help the network complete in the market.

Conclusion:

Right, so that was all the negative stuff as it relates the vCloud Air Network, but I have been thinking about how this can be a positive for both the vCAN and more importantly for me…vCloud Director. I’ll put together another post on where and how I believe VMware can take advantage of this partnership to truly compete against the looming threat of the Azure Stack…with vCAN IaaS providers offering vCloud Director SP front and center of that solution.

References:

http://www.vmware.com/company/news/releases/vmw-newsfeed.VMware-and-AWS-Announce-New-Hybrid-Cloud-Service,-%E2%80%9CVMware-Cloud-on-AWS%E2%80%9D.3188645-manual.html

https://aws.amazon.com/vmware/

VMware Cloud™ on AWS – A Closer Look

https://twitter.com/search?f=tweets&vertical=default&q=VMWonAWS

VMworld 2016: Cross Cloud Platform – Raw Thoughts

I’m still trying to process the VMworld 2016 Day 1 Keynote in my mind…trying to make sense of the mixed messages that myself and others took away from the 90 minute opening. Before I continue, I’ll point out that this is going to be raw post with opinions that are purely driven buy what I saw and heard during the keynote…I haven’t had much time to validate my thoughts although from my brief discussions with others here at the conference (and on Twitter) it’s clear that the Cross Cloud migration tech preview is an attempt at VMware catering to the masses. I’ll explain below why that’s both a good and bad thing and why the vCloud Air Network should be rightly miffed about what we saw demoed on stage.

Yesterday’s opening was all about Pat trying to make sure that everyone who was listening understood that VMware is still cool and relevant. The message around be_tomorrow was lost for me by the overall message that VMware has grown up and matured, but are still capable of producing teen like excitement through cool and hip technologies. If there was ever a direct reaction to the disruptive competitors VMware has had to deal with (looking at you Nutanix) then this was corporates attempt to mitigate that threat. Not sure that it worked, but did it really need to be done when you are effectively preaching to the converted?

Pat Gelsinger used his keynote to introduce the VMware® Cross-Cloud Architecture™. This is a game-changing new architecture that, as he says, “will enable customers to run, manage, connect, and secure applications across clouds and devices in a common operating environment.

During the first part of the keynote things where looking good for the vCAN with vCloud Air not getting much of a mention over the strong growth in the vCAN as shown on stage in the image above. Pat then went through and talked about trends in public and private clouds which lead into the messaging that Hybrid Cloud is the way of the future…no one cloud will rule them all. This isn’t new messaging and I agree 100% that there is a place in the world for all types of clouds, from the HyperScalers through to the smaller but more agile IaaS providers and managed private clouds.

AWSworld? – vCloud Air Network Concerns:

The second part of the keynote was where things got a little confusing for me. We saw two demo’s of Cross Cloud Architecture in tech preview. Let me start by saying that the UI looked consistent and modern and even managed to integrate vRealize Network Insight (Arkin) seamlessly and the NSX network extension is a brilliant step forward in being able to extend cloud networks between on-premises to public to vCAN Service Provider.

Where things got a little awkward for me was when the demo of the Cross Cloud Management console went through managing services and instances on AWS and Azure…without any mention or example or listing of any vCAN service provider. Not withstanding the focus on the growing partnership with IBM Softlayer in the new Cloud Foundation ecosystem that naturally competes directly against vCAN service providers the specific focus of AWS made a lot of providers uneasy.

Now, I understand that the vCAN can’t do everything and the there is an existing and future sense of inevitability around clients using more hyper-scale cloud services…but here is why I found this to be a bit of a slap in the face to the 4000+ strong vCAN. If you are going to demo the use of cross cloud why not focus on what the hyper-scalers do best that is PaaS? Don’t demo creating and moving traditional workload instances on AWS and then move it to Azure.

Again, this is a raw post and I do need to digest this a little more and I will follow up with a more in depth post and make no mistake that I do see value in the tool…but it does nothing to build and grow the vCAN…and that is the sore point at this point in time.

AWS…Complex Simplicity?

I came across a tweet over the weekend which showed a screen grab of the AWS product catalog (shown below) and a comment pointing out the fact that the sheer number of AWS services on offer by Amazon was part of the reason why they are doing so well.

The implication was that AWSs dominance was in part due to the fact they have what appears to be the complete product service catalog of Cloud and it provides a “simple”one stop shop

I’ve held a view for a while now that in order to go head to head against AWS Cloud Service Providers don’t need to go out of produce 1000+ cloud services…rather they should focus on keeping things figuratively simple by focusing on core strengths and doing what they do really well…really well.

Maybe I lack the impartiality to comment on this, but when I look at the AWS services page I get overwhelmed…and while from a technical point of view I can work through the configuration steps and multiple addon services…For small businesses looking to take their first steps into a hybrid cloud world AWS is not the panacea proclaimed by some. Even for small to large enterprises the simple fact AWS carries so much apparent choice should throw up some flags and be enough to make decision makers look at smaller more streamlined offerings that offer targeted solutions based on actual requirements.

AWS are massive…AWS are a juggernaut backed by seemingly endless research and development funding and enough scale to offer what appear to be cheaper services…and though they don’t market as much as Microsofts Azure they are still front of mind for most when cloud is talked about. Smaller providers such as IaaS in the vCloud Air Network can complete if the focus on delivery of a smaller subset of products and services is done with quality and reliability in mind…in my eyes, that’s enough to offer enough differentiation to compete.

So as a final thought…lets not be caught up with what customers think they might need…but what they actually require!

The Reality of Cloud – Outages are Like *holes…

It’s been a bad couple of weeks for cloud services both around the world and locally…Over the last three days we have seen AWS have issues which may have been indirectly related to the Leap Second on Tuesday night and this morning, Azure’s Sydney Zone had serious network connectivity issues which disrupted services for approximately three to four hours.

Closer to home, Zettagrid had a partial outage of our Sydney Zone last Wednesday morning which impacted a small subset of client VMs and services and this was on the back of a major (unnamed) provider in Europe being down for a number of days as pointed out in a blog post by Massimo Re Ferre’ linked below.

http://it20.info/2015/06/iaas-cloud-outages-get-over-it/ 

Massimo struck a cord with me and as the title of Massimo’s blog post suggests it’s time for consumers of public cloud services to get over outages and understand that when it comes to Cloud and IaaS…Outages will happen.

When you hear someone saying “I moved to the cloud because I didn’t want to experience downtime” it is fairly clear to me that you either have been heavily misinformed or you misunderstood what the benefits of a (IaaS) public cloud are

Regardless if you are juggernauts like Amazon, Microsoft or Google…or one of the smaller Service Providers…the reality of cloud services is that outages are a fact of life. Even SaaS based application are susceptible to outages and it must be understood that there is no magic that goes into the architecture of cloud platforms and while every effort goes into ensuring availability and resiliency Massimo sums it up well below.

Put it in (yet) another way: a properly designed public cloud is not intrinsically more reliable than a properly designed Enterprise data center (assuming like for like IT budgets).

That is because sh*t happens…

The reality of what can be done to prevent service disruption is for consumers of cloud services to look beyond the infrastructure and think more around the application. This message isn’t new and the methods undertaken by larger companies when deploying business critical service and applications is starting to change…however not every company can be a NetFlix or a Facebook so in breaking it down to a level that’s achievable for most…the question is.

How can everyday consumers of cloud services architect applications to work around the inevitable system outage?

  1. Think about a multi cloud or hybrid cloud strategy
  2. Look for Cloud Service Providers that have multiple Availability Zones
  3. Make sure that the Availability Zones are independent of one an other
  4. Design and deploy business critical applications across multiple Zones
  5. Watch out for Single Points of Failures within Availability Zones
  6. Employ solid backup and recovery strategies

They key to the points above is to not put all your eggs into one basket and then cry foul when that basket breaks…do not set an expectation whereby you become complacent in the fact that all Cloud Service Providers guarantee a certain level of system up time through SLA’s and then act surprised when an outage occurs. Most providers who are worth their salt do offer separate availability zones…but it’s very much up to the people designing and building services upon Services Provider Clouds to ensure that they are built to take advantage of this fact…you can’t come in stamping your feet and crying foul when the resources that are placed at your disposal to ensure application and service continuity are not taken advantage of.

Do not plan for 100% uptime…it does not exist! Anyone who tries to tell you otherwise is lying! You only have to search online to see that Outages are indeed like Assholes…everyone has them!

References:

http://au.pcmag.com/internet-products/35269/news/aws-outage-takes-down-netflix-pinterest

http://it20.info/2015/06/iaas-cloud-outages-get-over-it/

https://downdetector.com/status/aws-amazon-web-services/news/71670-problems-at-amazon-web-services