Tag Archives: Hybrid

VMware on AWS: vCloud Director and What Needs to be Done to Empower the vCAN

Last week VMware and Amazon Web Services officially announced their new joint venture whereby VMware technology will be available to run as a service on AWS in the form of bare-bones hardware with vCenter, ESXi, NSX and VSAN as the core VMware technology components. This isn’t some magic whereby ESXi is nested or emulated upon the existing AWS platform, but a fully fledged dedicated virtual datacenter offering that clients can buy through VMware and have VMware manage the stack right up to the core vCenter components.

Earlier in the week I wrote down some thoughts around the possible impact to the vCloud Air Network this new offering could have. While at first glance it would appear that I was largely negative towards the announcement, after having a think about the possible implications I started to think about how this could be advantageous for the vCloud Air Network. What it comes down to is how much VMware was to open up the API’s for all components hosted on AWS and how the vCloud Director SP product team develops around those API’s.

From there it will be on vCloud Air Network partners that have the capabilities to tap into the VMC’s. I believe there is an opportunity here for vCAN Service Providers to go beyond offering just IaaS and combine their offerings with the VMware AWS offering as well as help extend out to offer AWS PaaS without the worry that traditional VM workloads will be migrated to AWS.

For this to happen though VMware have to do something they haven’t done in the past…that is, commit to making sure vCAN providers can cash in on the opportunity and be empowered by the opportunity to grow VMware based services… as I mentioned in my original post:

In truth VMware have been very slow…almost reluctant to pass over features that would allow this cross cloud compatibility and migration be even more of a weapon for the vCAN by holding back on features that allowed on-premises vCenter and Workstation/Fusion connect directly to vCloud Air endpoints in products such as Hybrid Cloud Manager. I strongly believed that those products should have been extended from day zero to have the ability to connect to any vCloud Director endpoint…it wasn’t a stretch for that to occure as it is effectively the same endpoint but for some reason it was strategically labeled as a “coming soon” feature.

Extending vCloud Director SP:

I have taken liberty to extend the VMWonAWS graphic to include what I believe should be the final puzzle in what would make the partnership sit well with existing vCloud Air Network providers…that is, allow vCloud Director SP to bridge the gap between the on-premises compute, networking and storage and the AWS based VMware platform infrastructure.

vCloud Director is a cloud management platform that abstracts physical resources from vCenter and interacts with NSX to build out networking resources via the NSX Manager API’s…with that it’s not hard in my eyes to allow any exposed vCenter or NSX Manager to be consumed by vCloud Director.

With that allowed, any AWS vCenter dedicated instance can become a Virtual Datacenter object in vCloud Director and consumed by an organisation. For vCloud Air Network partners who have the ability to programatically interact with the vCloud Director APIs, this all of a sudden could open up another 70+ AWS locations on which to allow their customers to deploy Virtual Datacenters.

Take that one step further and allow vCD to overlay on-premises compute and networking resources and then allow connectivity between all locations via NSX hybridity and you have a seriously rock solid solution that extends a customer on-premises to a more conveniently placed (remember AWS isn’t everywhere) vCloud Air Network platform that can in turn consume/burst into a VMware Dedicated instance on AWS and you now have something that rivals the much hyped Hybrid Cloud Strategy of Microsoft and the Azure Stack.

What Needs to Happen:

It’s pretty simple…VMware need to commit to continued/accelerated development of vCloud Director SP (which has already begun in earnest) and give vCloud Air Network providers the ability to consume both ways…on-premises and on VMware’s AWS platform. VMware need to grant this capability to vCloud Air Network providers from the outset and not play the stalling game that was apparent when it came to feature parity with vCloud Air.

What I have envisioned isn’t far off becoming a reality…vCloud Director is mature and extensible enough to do what I have described above, and I believe that in my recent dealings with the vCloud Director product and marketing teams at VMworld US earlier this year that there is real belief in the team that the cloud management platform will continue to improve and evolve…if VMware allow it to.

Further improving on vCloud Directors maturity and extensibility, if the much maligned UI is improved as promised…with the upcoming addition of full NSX integration completing the network stack, the next step in greater adoption beyond the 300 odd vCAN SPs currently use vCloud Director needs a hook…and that hook should be VMWonAWS.

Time will tell…but there is huge potential here. VMware need to deliver to their partners in order to have that VMWonAWS potential realised.

 

VSAN 6.2: Reminder About Important Fix

[UPDATE] This issue is resolved in VMware ESXi 6.0, Patch Release ESXi600-201608001. For more information, see VMware ESXi 6.0, Patch Release ESXi600-201608001 (2145663).

Last week VMware released an important KB based around an issue with VSAN 6.2 where some VMs residing on existing Hybrid VSAN datastores may exhibit reduced disk IO performance after an upgrade. In a nutshell the issue is caused by a new operation that’s linked to the new deduplication and compression features in VSAN 6.2. The issue affects only VSAN 6.2 Hybrid deployments and is obviously not applicable to All Flash VSAN Clusters.

If impacted you may see:

  • A significantly lower than expected read cache hit ratio is observed on VSAN caching tier.
  • A higher percentage of IOPS may be observed on capacity tier disks on Hybrid diskgroups when compared from previous 6.x systems.
  • Overall increased VM observed latency

This issue is caused by VSAN 6.2 performing low level scanning for unique blocks, which is related to deduplication, can still occur on VSAN hybrid disk groups. This causes performance deterioration on Hybrid Disk groups, as it has a significant read caching performance impact on the SSD cache tier of VSAN disk groups.

The Workaround:

To work around this issue, if you are using a Hybrid configuration, you can turn off the dedup scanner option on each VSAN host in the VSAN Hybrid cluster. The way to turn it off is to modify the advanced setting lsomComponentDedupScanType which is set to a default value of 2. For the workaround you set that to 0. The easiest way to archive this is through PowerCLI as shown below.

Note that each host needs to be rebooted for the settings to take affect so go through the normal process of ensuring hosts go into VSAN maintenance mode before reboot.

Also worth mentioning a PowerCLI script that Jase McCarty has put up on GitHub that Gets/Sets the Deduplication Scanner settings with the use of some checks via a PowerCLI script that accepts variables.

https://github.com/jasemccarty/DedupeScan

References:

https://kb.vmware.com/kb/2146267

VSAN Upgrading from 6.1 to 6.2 Hybrid to All Flash – Part 3

When VSAN 6.2 was released earlier this year it came with new and enhanced features and with the price of SSDs continuing to fall and an expanding HCL it seems like All Flash instances are becoming more the norm and for those that have already deployed VSAN in a Hybrid configuration the temptation to upgrade to All Flash is certainly there. Duncan Epping has previously blogged the overview of migrating from Hybrid to All Flash so I wanted to expand on that post and go through the process in a little more detail. This is the final part of a three part blog series with the process overview outlined below.

Use the links below to page jump.

In part one I covered upgrading existing hosts, expanding an existing VSAN cluster and upgrading the license and disk format. In part two I covered the actual Hybrid to All Flash migration steps and in this last part I will finish off by going through the process of creating a new VSAN Policy, migrate existing VMs to the new policy and  then enable deduplication and compression.

Before continuing it’s worth pointing out that after the Hybrid to All Flash migration you are going to be left with an unbalanced VSAN cluster as the full data evacuation off the last Hybrid host will leave that host without objects. Any new objects created will work to re-balance the cluster however if you want to initiate a proactive re-balance you can tit the re-balance button from the Health status window. For more on this process check out this post from Cormac Hogan.

Create new Policy and Migrate VMs:

To take advantage of the new erasure coding now in the VSAN 6.2 All Flash cluster we will need to create a new storage policy and apply that policy to any existing VMs. In my case all VMs where on the Default VSAN Policy with FTT=1. The example below shows the creation of a new Storage Policy that uses RAID5 erasure coding with FTT=1. If you remember from previous posts the reason for expanding the cluster to four hosts was to cater for this specific policy.

To create the new Storage Policy head to VM Storage Policies from the Home page of the Web Client and click on Create New VM Storage Policy. Give policy a name, click Next and construct Rule-Set 1 which is based on VSAN. Select the Failure tolerance method and choose RAID-5/6 (Erasure Coding) – Capacity.

In this case with FTT=1 chosen RAID5 will be used. Clicking on Next should show that the existing VSAN datastore is compatible with the policy. With that done we can migrate existing VMs off the Default VSAN Policy onto the newly created one.

To get an list of what VMs are going to be migrated have a look at the PowerCLI commands below to get the VMs on the VSAN Datastore and then get their Storage Policy. The last command below gets a list of existing policies.

To apply the new Erasure Coding Storage Policy its handy to get the full name of the policy.

To migrate the VMs to the new policy you can either do it one by one via the Web Client of do it on mass via the following PowerCLI script.

Once run the VMs will have the new policy applied and VSAN will work in the background to get those VM objects compliant. You can see the status of Virtual Disk Placement in the Virtual SAN tab of the Monitor Tab of the cluster.

Enable DeDupe and Compression:

Before I go into the details…for a brilliant overview and explanation of DeDupe and Compression with VSAN 6.2 head to this post from Cormac Hogan. To enable this feature we need to double check that the licensing is correct as detailed in the first post and also ensure that all previous steps relating to the Hybrid to All Flah migration has taken place. To turn on this feature head to the General window under the Virtual SAN Settings menu on the cluster Manage tab and click on the Edit button next to Virtual SAN is Turned ON.

Choose Enabled in the drop down and take note of the checkbox that talks about Allow Reduced Redundancy understanding what that means by reading the info box as shown above. Once you click on the process to enable DeDuplication and Compress will begin…this process will go through an reconfigure all Disk Groups similar to to the process to upgrade from between Hybrid and All Flash. Again this will take some time depending on the number of host, number of disk groups and type of disks in the cluster.

Below I have shown the before and after of the Capacity window under the Virtual SAN tab in the Monitor section of the Cluster view. You can see that before enabled, there is a message saying that DeDeuplication and Compression is disabled.

And after enabling DeDuplication and Compression you start to get some statistics relating to both of them in the window relating to savings and ratios. Even in my small lab environment I started to see some benefits.

With that complete we have finished this series and have gone through all the steps in order to get to an All Flash VSAN Cluster with the newest features enabled.

References:

VSAN 6.2 Part 1 – Deduplication and Compression

VSAN 6.2 Part 2 – RAID-5 and RAID-6 configurations

 

VSAN Upgrading From 6.1 To 6.2 Hybrid To All Flash – Part 2

When VSAN 6.2 was released earlier this year it came with new and enhanced features and with the price of SSDs continuing to fall and an expanding HCL it seems like All Flash instances are becoming more the norm and for those that have already deployed VSAN in a Hybrid configuration the temptation to upgrade to All Flash is certainly there. Duncan Epping has previously blogged the overview of migrating from Hybrid to All Flash so I wanted to expand on that post and go through the process in a little more detail. This is part two of what is now a three part blog series with the process overview outlined below.

Use the links below to page jump.

In part one I covered upgrading existing hosts, expanding an existing VSAN cluster and upgrading the license and disk format. In this part am going to go through the simple task of extending the cluster by adding new All Flash Disk Groups on the host I added in part one and then go through the actual Hybrid to All Flash migration steps.

The configuration of the VSAN Cluster after the upgrade will be:

  • Four Host Cluster
  • vCenter 6.0.0 Update 2
  • ESXi 6.0.0 Update 2
  • One Disk Groups Per Host
  • 1x 480GB SSD Cache and 2x 1000GB SSD Capacity
  • VSAN Erasure Coding Raid 5 FTT=1
  • DeDuplication and Compression On

As mentioned in part one I added a new host to the cluster in order to give me some breathing room while doing the Hybrid to All Flash upgrade as we need to perform rolling maintenance on each hosts in the cluster in order to get to the All Flash configuration. Each host will be entered into maintenance mode and all data evacuated. Before the process is started on the initial three hosts lets go ahead and create a new All Flash Disk Group on the new hosts.

To create the new Disk Group head to Disk Management under the Virtual SAN section of the Manage Tab whilst the Cluster and click on the Create New Disk Group Button. As you can see below I have the option of selecting any of the flash devices claimed as being ok for VSAN.

After the disk selection is made and the disk group created, you can see below that there is now a mixed mode scenario happening where the All Flash host is participating in the VSAN Cluster and contributing to the capacity.

Upgrade Disk Group from Hybrid to All Flash:

Ok, now that there is some extra headroom the process to migrate the existing Hybrid Hosts over to All Flash can begin. Essentially what the process involves is placing the hosts in maintenance mode with a full data migration, deleting any existing Hybrid disk groups, removing the spinning disk, replacing them with flash and then finally creating new All Flash disk groups.

If you are not already aware about maintenance mode with VSAN then it’s worth reading over this VMware Blog Post to ensure you understand that using the VI Client is a big no no. In this case I wanted to do a full data migration which moves all VSAN components onto remaining hosts active in the cluster.

You can track this process by looking at the Resyncing Components section of the Virtual SAN Monitor Tab to see which objects are being copied to other hosts.

As you can see the new host is actively participating in the Hybrid mixed mode cluster now and taking objects.

Once the copy evacuation has completed we can now delete the existing disk groups on the host by highlights the disk group and clicking on the Remove Disk Group button. A warning appears telling us that data will be deleted and also lets us know how much data is currently on the disks. The previous step has ensured that there should be no data on the disk group and it should be safe to (still) select Full data migration and remove the disk group.

Do this for all existing Hybrid disk groups and once all disk groups have been deleted from the host you are ready to remove the existing spinning disks and replace them with flash disks. The only thing to ensure before attempting to claim the new SSDs is that they don’t have any previous partitions on them…if so you can use the ESXi Embedded Host Client to remove any existing partitions.

Warning: Again it’s worth mentioning that any full data data migration is going to take a fair amount of time depending on the consumed storage of your disk groups and the types of disks being used.

Repeat this process on all remaining hosts in the cluster with Hybrid disk groups until you have a full All Flash cluster as shown above. From here we are now able to take advantage of erasure coding, DeDuplication and compression…I will finish that off in part three of this series.

 

VSAN Upgrading from 6.1 to 6.2 Hybrid to All Flash – Part 1

When VSAN 6.2 was released earlier this year it came with new and enhanced features and depending on what version you where running you might not have been able to take advantage of them all right away. Across all versions, Software Checksum was added with Advanced and Enterprise versions getting VSANs implementation of Erasure Coding (RAID 5/6) with Deduplication and Compression available for the All Flash version and QOS IOPS Limiting available in Enterprise only.

With the price of SSDs continuing to fall and an expanding HCL it seems like All Flash instances are becoming more the norm and for those that have already deployed VSAN in a Hybrid configuration the temptation to upgrade to All Flash is certainly there. Duncan Epping has previously blogged the overview of migrating from Hybrid to All Flash so I wanted to expand on that post and go through the process in a little more detail. This is a two part blog post with a lot of screen shots to compliment the process which is outlined below.

Use the links below to page jump.

Warning: Before I begin it’s worth mentioning that this is not a short process so make sure you plan this out relative to the existing size of your VSAN cluster. In talking with other people who have gone through the disk format upgrade the average rate seems to be about 10TB of consumed data per day depending on the type of disks being used. I’ll reference some posts at the end that relates to the disk upgrade process as it has been troublesome for some however also worth pointing out that the upgrade process is non disruptive for running workloads.

Existing Configuration:

  • Three Host Cluster
  • vCenter 6.0.0 Update 2
  • ESXi 6.0.0 Update 1
  • Two Disk Groups Per Host
  • 1x 200GB SSD and 2x 600GB HDD
  • VSAN Default Policy FTT=1

Upgrade Existing Hosts to 6.0 Update 2:

At the time of writing ESXi 6.0.0 Update 2 is the latest release and the builds that contain the VSAN 6.2 codebase. From the official VMware Upgrade matrix it seems you can’t upgrade from VSAN versions older than 6.1, so if you are on 5.x or 6.0 releases you will need to take note of this VMwareKB to get to ESXI 6.0.0 Update 2. A great resource for the latest builds as well as links to upgrade from head here:

https://esxi-patches.v-front.de/ESXi-6.0.0.html

For a quick upgrade directly from the VMware online host update repository you can do the following on each host in the cluster after putting them into VSAN Maintenance Mode. Note that there are also some advanced settings that are recommended as part of the VSAN Health Checks in 6.2

After rolling through each host in the cluster make sure that you have an updated copy of the VSAN HCL and run a health check to see where you stand. You should see a warning about the disks needing an upgrade and if any hosts didn’t have the above advanced settings applied you will have a warning about that as well.

Expanding VSAN Cluster:

As part of this upgrade I am also adding an additional host to the existing three to expand to a four host cluster. I am doing this for a couple of reasons, not withstanding the accepted design position on four host being better than three from a data availability point of view you also need a minimum of four hosts if you want to enable RAID5 erasure coding (six is required as a minimum for RAID6). The addition of the fourth host also allowed me to roll through the Hybrid to AF upgrade with a lot more headroom.

Before adding the new host to the existing cluster you need to ensure that the build is consistent with the existing hosts in terms of versioning and more importantly networking. Ensure that you have configured an VMkernel Interface for VSAN traffic and marked it as such through the Web Client. If you don’t do this prior to putting the host into the existing cluster I found that the management VMKernel interface was enabled by default for VSAN.

If you notice below this cluster is also NSX enabled, hence the events relating to Virtual NICs being added. Most importantly the host can see other hosts in the cluster and is enabled for HA.

Once in the cluster the host can be used for VM placement with data served from the existing hosts with configured disk groups over the VSAN network.

Upgrade License:

At this point I upgraded the licenses to enable the new features in VSAN 6.2. As a refresher on VSAN licensing there are three editions with the biggest change from previous versions being that to get the Deduplication and Compression, Erasure Coding and QoS features you need to be running All Flash and have an Enterprise license key.

To upgrade the license you need to head to Licensing under the Configuration section of the Manage Tab whilst the Cluster is selected. Apply the new license and you should see the following.

Upgrade Disk Format:

If you have read up around upgrading VSAN you know that there is a disk format upgrade required to get the benefits of the newer versions. Once you have upgraded both vCenter and Hosts to 6.0.0 Update 2 if you check the VSAN Health under the Monitor Tab of the Cluster you should see an failure talking about v2 disks not working with v3 disks as shown below.

You can click on the Upgrade On-Disk Format button here to kick off the process. This can also be triggered from the Disk Management section under the Virtual San menu in the Manage cluster section of the Web Client. Once triggered you will see some events trigger and an update in progress message near the version number.

Borrowing from one of Cormac Hogan’s posts on VSAN 6.2 the following explains what is happening during the disk format upgrade. Also described in the blog post is a way using the Ruby vSphere Client to monitor the progress in more detail.

There are a few sub-steps involved in the on-disk format upgrade. First, there is the realignment of all objects to a 1MB address space. Next, all vsanSparse objects (typically used by snapshots) are aligned to a 4KB boundary. This will bring all objects to version 2.5 (an interim version) and readies them for the on-disk format upgrade to V3. Finally, there is the evacuation of components from a disk groups, then the deletion of said disk group and finally the recreation of the disk group as a V3. This process is then repeated for each disk group in the cluster, until finally all disks are at V3.

As explained above the upgrade can take a significant amount of time depending on the amount of disk groups, data consumed on your VSAN datastore as well as the type of disks being used (SAS based vs SATA/NL-SAS) Once complete you should have a green tick and the On-Disk format version reporting 3.0

With that done we can move ahead to the Hybrid to All Flash conversion. For details on the look out for Part 2 of this series coming soon.

References:

Hybrid vs All-flash VSAN, are we really getting close?

VSAN 6.2 Part 2 – RAID-5 and RAID-6 configurations

VSAN 6.2 Part 12 – VSAN 6.1 to 6.2 Upgrade Steps