Monthly Archives: August 2018

Released – Runecast Analyser 2.0

Earlier this week, Runecast released into General Availability version 2.0 of their vSphere analyser platform. I’ve been a keen follower of the progress of Runecast since their inception a couple of years ago. There was a space in the market to be filled and they have been able to improve in the initial release by releasing new functionality often. It wasn’t that long ago that they added vSAN support…and more recently NSX support.

This release brings the following new functionalities:

  • Ability to store and display all detected and resolved issues over time for every connected vCenter.
  • The completely new monitoring dashboard with The Most Affected hosts and trending.
  • Automation of PCI-DSS VMware rules and new PCI-DSS profile UI
  • Support for vSphere 6.7 HTML5 plugin
  • Usability, performance and security improvements for increased ease of use.
  • Latest VMware Knowledge Base updates.

First thing to notice in the new release is the new Dashboard that has been improved and for mine is now more logically laid out. But for me the biggest feature added in this release is the enhancement to Historical Trending and a new analysis function. As someone who spent a time managing and operating vSphere platforms over the years, the ability to see trends is crucial in troubleshooting.


Historical Analysis is new in version 2.0 and aims to help isolate the root cause of a reported incident as fast as possible and detect new problems caused by product update or configuration changes. 2.0 will store at least 3 months worth of vCenter, vSAN and NSX-V scan results, including issue description. This provides trending information on the dashboard.

The introduction of PCI-DSS checks is something that will assist in compliancy situations. As someone who has had the pain of going through compliancy, any tool that makes the process easier is welcomed.

Im looking forward to meeting up with the guys at VMworld 2018 in Las Vegas next week and I would recommend and vSphere admin to take a look at Runecast!
You can download Runecase 2.0 from here and take it for a spin: https://runecast.biz/profile

Veeam @VMworld 2018 Edition…

VMworld 2018 is less than a week away, and I can’t wait to fly into Las Vegas for my sixth VMworld and second with Veeam. It’s been an interesting year or so since the last VMworld and the industry has shifted a little when it comes to the backup and recovery market. Data management is the new buzz and lots of vendors (us included) have jumped onto the messaging around data growing at more than exponential rates…sprawling to more platforms than ever before and finally…being more critical than ever. The criticality and power of data is real and VMware still have a lot to say about where an how that data is processed and stored!

VMworld is still a destination event and Veeam recognises VMware’s continued influence in the IT industry by going all in at VMworld 2018. The ecosystem that VMware has built over the past ten to fifteen years is emense and though challenged a few years ago, came back with a bang in 2017. I’m looking forward to seeing VMware’s continues evolution at this years event! Like VMware,

Veeam is evolving as well, and we are building out own own strong ecosystem based on a software first, hardware agnostic platform that results in the greatest flexibility in the backup and recovery market. We continue to support VMware as our number 1 technology partner and this year we look to build on that with support for VMware Cloud on AWS and enhanced VMware features sets built into our core Backup & Replication product as we look to release Update 4 of 9.5 later in the year.

Veeam Sessions @VMworld:

Officially we have two breakout sessions this year, with Danny Allan and Rick Vanover presenting a What’s New in Update 4 for Veeam Backup & Replication and Michael Cade and myself presenting a session on Automation and Orchestration of VMware and Veeam on VMware Cloud on AWS. There are also a couple of vBrownBag Tech Talks where Veeam features including talks from Michael Cade and Michael White while Dave Russell will be presenting a Partner Spotlight session.

https://my.vmworld.com/widget/vmware/vmworld18us/uscatalog?search=Veeam

Veeam @VMworld Solutions Exchange:

This year, as per usual we will have significant presence on the floor, with a Main Booth Area doing demo’s prize, giveaways, having an Experts Bar and acting as sponsor of the opening night hall crawl. We also have an in booth Theatre where I will be presenting on our new vCloud Director integration with Veeam Cloud Connect.

Veeam Community Support @VMworld:

Veeam still gets the community and has been a strong supporter historically of VMworld community based events. This year again, we have come to the party are have gone all-in in terms of being front and center in supporting community events. Special mention goes to Rick Vanover who leads the charge in making sure Veeam is doing what it can to help make these events possible:

  • Opening Acts
  • VMunderground
  • vBrownBag
  • Spousetivities
  • vRockstar Party
  • Vanguard Takeover

Party with Veeam @VMworld:

Finally, it wouldn’t be VMworld without attending Veeam’s seriously legendary party. This year we are looking to top last years event at Hakkasan nightclub by taking over one of the hottest club in Vegas… Omnia Nightclub! If it’s anything like the VeeamON 2015 Party that I attended it’s going to go off!! I know how hard it is to plan evening activities at VMworld and there is no doubt that there are a lot of decent competing parties on the Tuesday night…however whatever you do, you need to make sure that you at least stop by Caesars Casino and party in green. RSVP here.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/veeams-legendary-vmworld-party-2018-tickets-45869296300

Final Word:

Again, this year’s VMworld is going to be huge and Veeam will be right there front and center of the awesomeness. Please stop by our sessions, visit our stand and attend our community sponsored events and feel free to chase me down for a chat…I’m always keen to meet other members of this great community. Oh, and don’t forget to get to the party!

Veeam Availability Console 2.0 Update 1 Important Patch Release

Earlier this month a patch was released for Veeam Availability Console 2.0 Update 1. Contained in the list of fixes is an important note about those that manage Windows Agents through VAC that are sending backups via backup copy jobs. In short there was an issues with the reporting and billing leading to some incorrect value for the tenant quota usage.

There are also a number of other resolved issues including some monitoring and alarm fixes as well as for those using the ConnectWise Plugin. The patch is advised to be deployed to all VCSPs running VAC especially those with tenants sending backup copy jobs as mentioned above.

To apply the patch, head to the VeeamKB here and follow the instructions. You need to have at least VAC 2.0 Update 1 Build 2.0.2.1750 as shown below.

From there, make sure you have a backup of the database, close down the Web UI and execute both MSI packages as administrator on the server.

The first one updates the VAC server.

The second one updates the ConnectWise Manage Plugin. Once completed the patches are applied and VAC 2.0 Update 1 is up to date running on version number Server Version 2.0.2.1807. Note that updated Windows for Agent Builds have been pushed out and can be upgraded as per my post a few months back.

References:

https://www.veeam.com/kb2694

Automating the Creation of AWS VPC and Subnets for VMware Cloud on AWS

Yesterday I wrote about how to deploy a Single Host SDDC through the VMware Cloud on AWS web console. I mentioned some pre-requisites that where required in order for the deployment to be successful. Part of those is to setup an AWS VPC up with networking in place so that the VMC components can be deployed. While it’s not too hard a task to perform through the AWS console, in the spirit of the work I’m doing around automation I have gotten this done via a Terraform plan.

The max lifetime for a Single Instance deployment is 30 days from creation, but the reality is most people will/should be using this to test the waters and may only want to spin the SDDC up for a couple of hours a day, run some tests and then destroy it. That obviously has it’s disadvantages as well. The main one being that you have to start from scratch every time. Given the nature of the VMworld session around the automation and orchestration of Veeam and VMC, starting from scratch is not an issue however it was desirable to look for efficiencies during the re-deployment.

For those looking to save time and automate parts of the deployment beyond the AWS VPC, there are a number of PowerShell code example and modules available that along with the Terraform plan, reduce the time to get a new SDDC firing.

I’m using a combination of the above scripts to deploy a new SDDC once the AWS VPC has been created. The first one actually deploys the SDDC through PowerShell while the second one is a module that allows some interactivity via commandlets to do things such as export and import Firewall rules.

Using Terraform to Create AWS VPC for VMware Cloud on AWS:

The Terraform plan linked here on GitHub does a couple of things:

  • Creates a new VPC
  • Creates a VPC Network
  • Creates three VPC subnets across different Availability Zones
  • Associates the three VPN subnets to the main route table
  • Creates desired security group rules

https://github.com/anthonyspiteri/vmc_vpc_subnet_create

[Note] Even for the Single Instance Node SDDC it will take about 120 minutes to deploy…so that needs to be factored in in terms of the window to work on the instance.

Creating a Single Host SDDC for VMware Cloud on AWS

While preparing for my VMworld session with Michael Cade on automating and orchestrating the deployment of Veeam into VMware Cloud on AWS, we have been testing against the Single Host SDDC that’s been made available for on demand POCs for those looking to test the waters on VMware Cloud on AWS. The great thing about using the Single Host SDDC is it’s obviously cheaper to run than the four node production version, but also that you can spin it up and destroy the instance as many times as you like.

Single Host SDDC is our low-cost gateway into the VMware Cloud on AWS hybrid cloud solution. Typically purchased as a 4-host service, it is the perfect way to test your first workload and leverage the additional capability and flexibility of VMware Cloud on AWS for 30 days. You can seamlessly scale-up to Production SDDC, a 4-host service, at any time during the 30-days and get even more from the world’s leading private cloud provider running on the most popular public cloud platform.

To get started with the Single Host SDDC, you need to head to this page and sign up…you will get an Activation email and from there be able to go through the account setup. This big thing to note at the moment is that a US Based Credit Card is required.

There are a few pre-requisites before getting an SDDC spun up…mainly around VPC networking within AWS. There is a brilliant blog post here, that describes the networking that needs to be considered before kicking off a fresh deployment. The offical help files are a little less clear on what needs to be put into place from an AWS VPC perspective, but in a nutshell you need:

  • An AWS Account
  • A fresh VPC with a VPC Networking configured
  • At least three VPC Subnets configured
  • A Management Subnet for the VMware Objects to sit on

Once this has been configured in the AWS Region the SDDC will be deployed into the process can be started. First step is to select a region (this is dictated by the choices made at account creation) and then select a deployment type followed by a name for the SDDC.

The next step is to link an existing AWS account. This is not required at the time of setup however it is required to get the most out of the solution. This will go off and launch an AWS CloudFormation template to connect the SDDC to the AWS account. It creates IAM role to allow communication between the SDDC and AWS.

[Note] I ran into an issue initially where the default location for the CloudFormation template to be run out of was not set to the region where the SDDC was to be deployed into. Make sure that when you click on the Launch button you take not the the AWS region and change where appropriate by change the URL to the correct region.

After a minute or so, the VMware Cloud on AWS Create an SDDC page will automatically refresh as shown below

The next step is to select the VPC and the VPC subnets for the raw SDDC components to be deployed into. I ran into a few gotcha’s on this initially and what you need to have configured is the subnets configured to size as listed in the user guides and the post I linked to that covers networking, but you also need to make sure you have at least three subnets configured across different AWS Availability zones within the region. This was not clear, but I was told by support that it was required.

If the AWS side of things is not configured correctly you will see this error.

What you should see…all things being equal is this.

Finally you need to set the Management Subnet which is used for the vCenter, Hosts, NSX Manager and other VMware components being deployed into the SDDC. There is a default, but it’s important to consider that this should not overlap with any existing networks that you may look to extend the SDDC into.

From here, the SDDC can be deployed by clicking on the Deploy SDDC button.

[Note] Even for the Single Instance Node SDDC it will take about 120 minutes to deploy and you can not cancel the process once it’s started.

Once completed we can click into the details of the SDDC, which allows you to see all the relevant information relating to it and also allows you to configure the networking.

Finally, to access the vCenter you need to configure a Firewall rule to allow web access through the management gateway.

Once completed you can login to the vCenter that’s hosted on the VMware Cloud on AWS instance and start to create VMs and have a play around with the environment.

There is a way to automate a lot of what i’ve stepped through above…for that, i’ll go through the tools in another blog post later this week.

References:

https://cloud.vmware.com/community/2018/04/24/selecting-ip-subnets-sddc/

Video – Protecting AWS and Hybrid Workloads with Veeam and N2WS

Back in April, I was lucky enough to present at the AWS Summit in Singapore. The session was a joint one with Alex Thomson from N2WS on how Veeam and N2WS are protecting native workloads within AWS and also extending that out to protecting Hybrid workloads sitting on-premises back to AWS or within VMware Cloud on AWS. The session video is embedded below and goes for about 30 minutes.

Alex and I talk about Veeam’s vision for Intelligent Data Management, an introduction into N2WS, a look at VTL solutions for offsite backups and finish out with an introduction into how Veeam works natively with VMware Cloud on AWS.

Veeam has pioneered the market of Availability for the Always On Enterprise by helping enterprises meet recovery time and point objectives (RTPO) of less than 15 minutes on any cloud or hybrid platform. Veeam recently acquired N2WS, a leading provider of cloud native backup and DR solutions providing backup automation and instant recovery for AWS workloads. Come and hear how N2WS is leading the backup and recovery of EC2 instances and native AWS workloads, how Veeam VTL technology leveraging the AWS Storage Gateway offers offsite cloud repositories as well as how Veeam is offering leading availability solutions for VMware Cloud on AWS.

Speakers

– Anthony Spiteri, Global Technologist, Product Strategy, Veeam.
– Alexander Thomson, Sales Director EMEA & APAC, N2WS

Quick Fix – Backup for Office 365 Self Service Recovery Fails with Incompatible Version

A couple of weeks ago we released version 2.0 of Veeam Backup for Office 365 which added support for SharePoint and OneDrive. Earlier this year I wrote about the awesome self service capabilities that are included for Veeam Cloud and Service Providers in the VBO platform, and also the huge opportunity that exists in the provider space to offer backup service for Exchange. Add to that SharePoint and OneDrive and that opportunity only gets bigger.

I’m putting together a couple of posts around the self service of SharePoint and OneDrive in the 2.0 release, but in the meantime this is a very quick fix post for those that might be getting the below error when trying to connect to service provider endpoints running VBO services for Exchange Online.

Incompatible Veeam Backup for Office 365 server version, received 9.6.3.567, expected 9.6.0.1308

To resolve this issue, then tenant needs to download the VBO 2.0 download package and install the new version of the Veeam Explorer for Microsoft Exchange that’s included in the release.

This will update the existing Explorer version from that distributed with Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5. The awesome thing about getting the upgrade as part of the VBO 2.0 package is that for the 1.5 release where self service was first introduced, tenants had to wait for Update 3 for Backup & Replication to consume the service.

Once this has been updated you can once again connect to the Cloud Connect infrastructure of the Service Provider that allows the self service recoverability function to take place.