Monthly Archives: September 2018

Quick Fix: Specified vCloud Director is not supported when trying to add vCD 9.1 to Veeam ONE

Back in May when VMware released vCloud Director 9.1 they also depreciated support for a number of older API versions:

End of Support for Older vCloud API Versions

  • vCloud Director 9.1 no longer supports vCloud API versions 1.5 and 5.1. These API versions were deprecated in a previous release.
  • vCloud Director 9.1 is the last release of vCloud Director to support any vCloud API versions earlier than 20.0. Those API versions are deprecated in this release and will not be supported in future releases.

Due to this, and being mid release cycle, Veeam ONE had issues connecting to vCD instances that where running version 9.1.

The error you would get if you tried to connect was:

Over the past few months i’ve had questions around this and if it was going to be fixed by way of a patch. While we are waiting for the next release of Veeam ONE that is due with Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4 there is a way to get vCD 9.1 instances connected into the current build of Veeam ONE.

There is a HotFix available through Veeam Support to resolve the Known Issue. It involves stopping the Veeam ONE services, replacing a couple of DLL’s and then re-starting the services. Once implemented Veeam ONE is able to connect to vCD 9.1.

So if you have this problem, raise a support case, grab the HotFix and the issue will be sorted.

References:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/vCloud-Director/9.1/rn/rel_notes_vcloud_director_91.html#deprecated

Automated Configuration of Backup & Replication with PowerShell

As part of the Veeam Automation and Orchestration for vSphere project myself and Michael Cade worked on for VMworld 2018, we combined a number of seperate projects to showcase an end to end PowerShell script that called a number of individual modules. Split into three parts, we had a Chef/Terraform module that deployed a server with Veeam Backup & Replication installed. A Terraform module that deployed and configured an AWS VPC to host a Linux Repository with a Veeam PN Sitegateway. And finally a Powershell module that configured the Veeam server with a number of configuration items ready for first use.

The goal of the project was to release a PowerShell script that fully deployed and configured a Veeam platform on vSphere with backup repositories, vCenter server and default policy based jobs automatically configured and ready for use. This could then be adapted for customer installs, used on SDDC platforms such as VMware Cloud on AWS, or for POCs or lab use.

While we are close to releasing the final code on GitHub for the project, I thought I would branch out the last section of the code and release it separately. As I was creating this script, it became apparent to me that it would be useful for others to use as is or as an example from which to simplify manual and repetitive tasks that go along with configuring Backup & Replication after installation.

Script Overview:

The PowerShell script (found here on GitHub) performs a number of configuration actions against any Veeam Backup & Replication Server as per the included functions.

All of the variables are configured in a config.json file meaning nothing is required to be modified in the main PowerShell script. There are a number of parameters that can be called to trigger or exclude certain functions.

There are some pre-requisites that need to be in place before the script can be executed…most importantly the PowerShell needs to be executed on a system where the Backup & Replication Console is installed to allow access to the Veeam PowerShell Snap-in. From there you just need a new Veeam Backup & Replication server and a vCenter server plus their login credentials. If you want to add a Cloud Connect Provider offering Cloud Connect Backup or/and Replication you enter in all the details in the config.json file as well. Finally, if you want to add a Linux Repository you will need the details of that plus have it configured for key based authentication.

You can combine any of the parameters listed above. An example is shown above where -ClearVBRConfig has been used to reverse the -RunVBRConfigure parameter that was executed first to do an end to end configure. For Cloud Connect Replication, if you want to configure and deploy an NEA there is a specific parameter for that. If you didn’t want to configure Cloud Connect or the Linux Repository the parameters can be used individually, or together. If those two parameters are used, the Default Backup Repository will be used for the jobs that are created.

Automating Policy Based Backup Jobs:

Part of the automation that we where keen to include was the automatic creation of default backup jobs based on vSphere Tags. The idea was to have everything in place to ensure that once the script had been run, VMs could be backed up dependant on them being added to vSphere Tags. Once done the backup jobs would protect those VMs based on the policies set in the config.json.

The corresponding jobs are all using the vSphere Tags. From here the jobs don’t need to be modified when VMs are added…VMs assigned those Tags will be included in the job.

Conclusion:

Once the script has been run you are left with a fully configured Backup & Replication server that’s connected to vCenter and if desired (by default) has local and Cloud Connect repositories added with a set of default policy based jobs ready to go using vSphere Tags.

There are a number of improvements that I want to implement and I am looking out for Contributors on GitHub to help develop this further. At its base it is functional…but not perfect. However it highlights the power of the automation that is possible with Veeam’s PowerShell Snap-In and PowerCLI. One of the use-cases for this was for repeatable deployments of Veeam Backup & Replication into POCs or labs and for those looking to standup those environments, this is a perfect companion.

Look out for the full Veeam SDDC Deploy Toolkit being released to GitHub shortly.

References:

https://github.com/anthonyspiteri/powershell/tree/master/BR-Configure-Veeam

Quick Fix – Backing up vCenter Content Library Content with Veeam

A question came up in the Veeam Forums this week about how you would backup the contents of a Content Library. As a refresher, content libraries are container objects for VM templates, vApp templates, and other types of files. Administrators can use the templates in the library to deploy virtual machines and vApps via vCenter. Using Content libraries results in consistency, compliance, efficiency, and automation when deploying workloads at scale.

Content Libraries are created and managed from a single vCenter, but can be shared to other vCenter Server instances. VM templates and vApps templates are stored as OVF file formats in the content library. You can also upload other file types, such as ISO images, text files, and so on, in a content library. It’s possible to create content libraries that are 3rd party hosted, such as the example here by William Lam looking at how to create and manage an AWS S3 based content library.

For those looking to store them locally on an ESXi datastore there is a way to backup the contents of the content library with a Veeam Backup & Replication File Copy job. This is a basic solution to the question posed in the Veeam Forums however it does work. With the File Copy, you can choose any file or folder contained in any connected infrastructure in Backup & Replication. For a Content Library stored on an ESXi datastore you just need to browse to the location as shown below.

The one caveat is that the destination can’t be a Veeam Repository. There is no versioning or incremental copy so every time the job is executed a full backup of the files is performed.   

One way to work around this is to set the destination to a location that is being backed up in a Veeam Job or an Agent Job. However if the intention is to just protect the immediate contents of the library than have a full once off backup shouldn’t be an issue.

You can also create/add to a File Copy job from the Files view as shown above.

In terms of recovery, The File Copy job is doing a basic file copy and doesn’t know about the fact the files are part of a Content Library and as you can see, the folder structure that vCenter creates uses UIDs for identification. Because of this, if there was a situation where a whole Content Library was lost, it would have to be recreated in vCenter and then the imported back in directly from the File Copy Job destination folder location.

Again, this is a quick and nasty solution and it would be a nice feature addition to have this backed up natively…naming and structure in place. For the moment, this is a great way of utilizing a cool feature of Veeam Backup & Replication to achieve the goal.

Creating Policy Based Backup Jobs for vCloud Director Self Service Portal with Tenant Creation

For a long time Veeam has lead the way in regard to the protection of workloads running in vCloud Director. Veeam first released deep integration into vCD back in version 7 of Backup & Replication that talked directly to the vCD APIs to facilitate the backup and recovery of vCD workloads and their constructs. More recently in version 9.5, the vCD Self Service Portal was released which also taps into vCD for tenant authentication.

This portal leverages Enterprise Manager and allows service providers to grant their tenants self-service management of their vCD workloads. It’s possible that some providers don’t even know that this portal exists let alone the value it offers. I’ve covered the basics of the portal here…but in this post, I want to talk about how to use the Veeam APIs and PowerShell SnapIn to automatically enable a tenant, create a default backup jobs based on policies, tie backup copy jobs to default job for longer retention and finally import the jobs into the vCD Self Service Portal ready for use.

Having worked with a service provider recently, they requested to have previously defined service definitions for tenant backups ported to Veeam and the vCD Self Service Portal. Part of this requirement was to have tenants apply backup policies to their VMs…this included short term retention and longer term GFS based backup.

One of the current caveats with the Veeam vCD Self Service Portal is that backup copy jobs are not configurable via the web based portal. The reason for this is that It’s our belief that service providers should be in control of longer term restore operations, however some providers and their tenants still request this feature.

Translated to a working solution, the PowerShell script combines a previously released set of code by Markus Kraus that uses the Enterprise Manager API to setup a new tenant in the vCD Self Service portal and a set of new functions that create default backup and backup copy jobs for vCD and then imports them into the portal ready for use. The variables are controlled by a JSON file making the script portable for Veeam Cloud and Service Providers to use as a base and build upon.

The end result is that when a tenant first logs into the vCD Self Service Portal they have jobs, dictated by the desired polices ready for use. The backup jobs are set to disabled without a schedule set. The scope of the default jobs is the tenant’s Virtual Datacenter. If there is a corresponding backup copy job, this is tied to the backup job and is ready to do its thing.

From here, the tenant can choose which policy that want to apply to their workloads and edit the desired job, change or leave the scope and add a schedule. The job name in the Backup and Replication console is modified to indicate which policy the tenant selected.

Again, if the tenant chooses a policy that requires longer term retention, the corresponding backup copy job is enabled in the Backup & Replication console…though not managed by the tenant.

Self service recovery is possible by the tenant for through the portal as per usual, including full VM recovery, file and application item level recovery. For recovery of the longer term workloads and/or items, this is done by the Service Provider.

This is a great example of the power of the Veeam API and PowerShell SnapIn providing a solution to offer more than what is out of the box and enhance the offering around the backup of vCloud Director workloads with Veeam’s integration. Feel free to use as is, or modify and integrate into your service offerings.

GitHub Page: https://github.com/anthonyspiteri/powershell/tree/master/vCD-Create-SelfServiceTenantandPolicyJobs

Veeam on the VMware Cloud Marketplace Protecting VMware Cloud on AWS Workloads

At VMworld 2018, myself and Michael Cade gave a session on automating and orchestrating Veeam on VMware Cloud on AWS. The premise of the session was to showcase the art of the possible with Veeam and VMware that resulted in a fully deployed and configured Veeam platform. We chose VMware Cloud on AWS for the demo to showcase the power of the Software Defined Datacenter with Veeam, however our solution can be deployed onto any vSphere platform.

Why Veeam with VMware Cloud on AWS:

I’ve have spent a lot of time over the past couple of months looking into VMware Cloud on AWS and working out just where Veeam fits in terms of a backup and recovery solution for it. I’ve also spent time talking to VMware sales people as well as solution providers looking to wrap managed services around VMC and the question of data protection is often raised as a key concern. There is a good article here that talks about the need for backup and how application HA or stretched clustering is not a suitable alternative.

Without prejudice, I truly believe that Veeam is the best solution for the backup and recovery of workloads hosted on VMware Cloud on AWS SDDCs. Not only do we offer a solution that’s 100% software defines it’s self, but we can extend protection of all workloads from on-premises, through to the SDDC and also natively in AWS covering both backup, replication as well as offering the ability to use Cloud Connect to backup out to a Veeam Cloud and Service Provider. I’ll go into this in greater detail in a future post.

Veeam on the VMware Cloud on AWS Marketplace:

At the same time as our session on the Monday there was another session that introduced the VMware Cloud Marketplace that was announced in Technical Preview. As part of that launch, Veeam was announced as an initial software partner. This allows for the automated deployment and configuration of a Veeam Backup & Replication instance directly into a deployed SDDC and also configures an AWS EC2 EBS backed instance to be used as a Veeam Repository.

The VMware Cloud Marketplace will offer the ability to browse and filter validated third-party products and solutions, view technical and operational details, facilitate Bring Your Own License (BYOL) deployments, support commercial transactions, and deliver unified invoices. We plan to open Cloud Marketplace to a limited Beta audience following VMworld and are working on additional features and capabilities for future releases. We envision the Cloud Marketplace will quickly expand, introducing new third-party vendors and products over time and becoming the de-facto source for customers to extend the capabilities of VMware Cloud on AWS and VMware Cloud Provider Partner environments.

Compared to what Michael and I showcased in our session, this is a more targeted vanilla deployment of Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 with Update 3a into the SDDC. At the end of the process, you will be able to access the Veeam Console, have it connected to the VMC vSphere endpoint and have the EC2 Veeam repository added.

This is done via CloudFormation templates and a little bit of PowerShell embedded into the Windows Image.

Being embedded directly into the VMware Cloud Marketplace is advantageous for customers looking to get started quick with their data protection for workloads running on VMware Cloud o AWs. Look out for more collateral from myself, Veeam and VMware on protecting VMC with Veeam as well as a deeper look at our VMworld session which digs into the automation and orchestration of Veeam on VMware Cloud on AWS using Chef, Terraform, PowerShell and PowerCLI.

References:

Introducing VMware Cloud Marketplace

https://cloud.vmware.com/cloud-marketplace

https://marketplace.vmware.com/vsx/solutions/veeam-availability-suite-for-vmware-cloud-on-aws-9-5?ref=search#summary

VMworld 2018 Recap Part 2 – Community and Veeam Recap

VMworld 2018 has come and gone and after a couple of days recovery from the week that was, i’ve had time to reflect on what was a great week and an another great VMworld in Las Vegas. For me, the dynamic of what it is to be at a VMworld has changed. The week is not just about the event, the announcements or the sessions…but more about what myself and my team are able to achieve. While we are participants of VMworld we are also working and need to be adding value on all fronts.

This year I left Las Vegas with a sense of achievement and the belief that the week was extremely successful both personally and from a Veeam Product Strategy point of view. In this post (which is Part 2 of my VMworld 2018 recap) I am going to go over what went down with the VMware community during the event and close off with a quick Veeam roundup.

Community:

I felt like the community spirit was in full effect again at VMworld. Between all the sessions, parties and events my overall feeling was that there was a lot of community activity going on. Twitter it’s self came to life and everyones timelines where filling up with #VMworld media. The grass roots community still fuels a lot of VMware’s success and you can’t underestimate the value of influence and advocacy at this level. Certainly, Veeam and other vendors understand this and cater to supporting community events while looking after members with vendor branded swag.

One important thing I would like to highlight is the power of the local community and how something small can turn into something huge. My good friend from Australia, Tim Carman had an idea last year to create an As Built PowerShell Documentation script. He first presented it at his local VMUG…then a few months later he presented it at the Melbourne VMUG UserCon and last week, he presented it with Matt Allford in front of 500 plus people at VMworld. Not only that, but the session was voted into the daily top ten and is currently the second most downloaded via the online session download page!

Hackathon:

Another amazing thing that happened at VMworld was the team that I was lucky enough to be a member of took out the Hackathon. Aussie vMafia 2.0, lead by Mark Ukotic took out the main prize on the back of an idea to put a terminal in the (H5) Client and running commands. Again, what I was most pleased about with Mark, Tim and Matt’s success was exposure from the sessions and Hackathon win. They are great guys and well deserving of it. It goes down as one of my best VMworld highlights of all time!

Veeam Highlights and Sessions:

Finally to wrap things up, it was a great VMworld for Veeam. I spoke to a lot of customers and partners and it’s clear that our Availability Platform that’s driven through our strong ecosystem alliances is still very much resonating and seen to be leading the industry. Being hardware agnostic and software only carries massive weight and it was pleasing to have that validated by talking to customer and partners during the course of the event.

In terms of our sessions, we had two different breakouts. One covering some of the brilliant new features in Update 4 of Backup & Replication 9.5 presented by Danny Allan and Rick Vanover.

And myself and Michael Cade presented on automation and orchestration of Veeam on VMware Cloud on AWS. Michael talks about the session here, but in a nutshell we came up with a workflow that orchestrates the deployment of a Veeam Backup & Replication Server with Proxies onto a vSphere environment (VMC used in this case to highlight the power of the SDDC) and then deploys and configures a Veeam Linux Repository in AWS, hooks that into a VeeamPN extended network and then configures the Veeam Server ready to backup VMs.

Finally…it wouldn’t be VMworld without a Veeam party, and this year didn’t fail to live up to expectation. Held at the Omnia nightclub on Tuesday night it was well received and we managed to fill the club without the need to pull in a headline act. And as I tweeted out…

Wrap Up:

Overall, VMworld ticked a lot of boxes and was well received by everyone that I came across. IT’s been a good run of three VMworld’s in a row in Vegas, however it’s time to move back to where it all started for me in 2012 in San Fransisco. It’s going to be interesting going back to the Mascone Center and a city that hasn’t got the best reputation at the present moment due to social issues and the cost of accomodation is astronomical compared to Vegas. However, location is one thing…it’s what VMware and it’s ecosystem partners bring to the event. This year it worked! Hopefully next year will be just as successful.

VMworld 2018 Recap Part 1 – Major Announcement Breakdown!

VMworld 2018 has come and gone and after a couple of days recovery from the week that was, i’ve had time to reflect on what was a great week and an another great VMworld in Las Vegas. In this post I wanted to break down what I saw as the major announcements at the 2018 event and highlight some of the cool stuff VMware is bringing out for their customers, partners and technology partners.

VMware have kept up the momentum from last years VMworld and have continued on their pivot from a hyper-visor company to one that truly spans a multi-platform ecosystem of partners and other technologies. This post again is all about VMware at VMworld…i’ll focus on the Veeam happenings and my community experiences at VMworld in part 2.

VMware Cloud on AWS:

I’m a believer! I am personally excited with what VMware have delivered here. The focus of my session on Automating and Orchestrating Veeam was around VMware Cloud on AWS (VMC) utilising a Single Node SDDC for our live demo. Having presented at VeeamON with Emad Younis on VMC and Veeam I have since had my head deeply in the offering. VMware seem to be addressing the pricing concerns myself and others have and are now allowing smaller host deployments (from three to two later down the track) along with more flexible licensing.

The M5 release will feature NSX-T which offers a lot more hard core networking capabilities which will directly connect to AWS Direct Connect. The announcement of high-capacity storage option built into the vSAN cluster using Amazon EBS is an interesting one and an example of the mushing together of VMware and AWS technologies.

With all that said, I’m still not sure where this offering sits when compared to VCPP hosted IaaS and how it has the potential to impact that side of VMware’s business. That maybe a topic for a dedicated blog post…but not now.

Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) on VMware:

This came as a surprise, but is in itself an interesting announcement. Having the ability to run RDS on-premises with the ability to migrate/move the workloads to and from AWS opens up a number of possabilities. With support Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, PostgreSQL, MySQL, and MariaDB databases it’s covering a lot of existing use cases. No doubt this is a mechanism for complete cloud transition, but the choice to run this on-premises or in a hybrid setup is genius.

vCloud Provider Announcements:

Having been on the beta program for the next version of vCloud Director I knew what was coming, but I didn’t think it would be announced at VMworld. Suffice to say the next version of vCD will be another significant one. Version 9.5 continues to build on the momentum of the 9.x releases and continues to enhance the platform as the flagship Cloud Management Platform for Service Providers.

New innovations include cross-site networking improvements powered by deeper integration with NSX and Initial integration with NSX-T. A full transition to an HTML5 UI for the cloud tenant with improvements to role-based access control. There is also going to be a virtual appliance option. I’m looking forward to this dropping later in the year and continuing to #LongLivevCD!

One thing to touch on as well is the native integrated data protection capabilities using Avamar. This is directly integrated into the vCD HTML5 UI via the extensibility plugin. I’ve had a lot of requests from service providers who use Veeam as their trusted availability platform for vCD if we will release similar functionality. At this stage, we can’t make any promises but it’s something getting face time at the top levels of our R&D and Product Management and Strategy teams.

There was also a new VMware Cloud Foundation version announced. Details here.

vSphere and vSAN:

vSAN continues to evolve and improve and there is also a lot to look forward to in the vSphere 6.7 Update 1. There is a new quickstart wizard that walks you through the setup of a cluster that includes a number of tasks that where previously not hard to install…but not as well thought out in terms of ease of use. Operationally, dealing with vSAN Firmware and driver updates has always been painful, but again this update looks to streamline that process by moving the functionality into the HTML5 vSphere Update Manager.

There has also been enhancements to maintenance mode activities, improved health checking and diagnostics as well as TRIM/UNMAP support that uses less storage through the process of automatic space reclamation. This can automatically reclaim capacity that is no longer used, reduces the capacity needed for workloads without administrator interaction.

In terms of vSphere, all administrative functions have been completed for the vSphere Client so in theory there should be no more switching between the old Flex and HTML5 clients. vSphere Platinum is a new edition of vSphere that combines vSphere Enterprise Plus along with AppDefense which is their SaaS based  security product built to alert and remediate against anything that looks out of the norm. It seems like most vendors are releasing SaaS based offerings with Machine Learning behind them in this space as security tools…I do wonder if the market is flooded?

Other Notables:

Project Dimension looked interesting, but as with any VMware project I tend to wait for more concrete announcements closer to release. And it seems as though Edge computing is here to stay as a term. Remote offices are now the Edge!

Project Dimension will extend VMware Cloud to deliver SDDC infrastructure and hardware as-a-service to on-premises locations.  Because this is will be a  service, it means that VMware can take care of managing the infrastructure, troubleshooting issues, and performing patching and maintenance.  This in turn means customers can focus on differentiating their business building innovative applications rather than spending time on day-to-day infrastructure management.

Speaking of the Edge, I did like the sound of the announcement around ESXi on 64bit ARM. VMware demonstrated ESXi on 64bit ARM running on a windmill farm at the Edge. VMware sees an opportunity to work with selected embedded OEMs to scope and explore opportunities for focused, ARM-enabled offering at the edge. This is the current 64bit ARM CPU architecture used on Apple TV 4 so we could have ESXi on AppleTVs in the near future!

References:

https://ir.vmware.com/overview/press-releases/press-release-details/2018/AWS-and-VMware-Announce-Amazon-Relational-Database-Service-on-VMware/default.aspx

https://blogs.vmware.com/virtualblocks/2018/08/27/whats-new-in-vsan-6-7-update-1/

https://blogs.vmware.com/vcloud/2018/08/vmware-vcloud-director-9-5.html

https://ir.vmware.com/overview/press-releases/press-release-details/2018/VMware-Previews-Technology-Innovations-at-VMworld-2018/default.aspx

http://vmblog.com/archive/2018/08/27/aws-and-vmware-announce-amazon-relational-database-service-on-vmware.aspx

Released – NSX-v 6.4.2 – What’s in it for Service Providers (Networking Enhancements)

The week before VMworld, VMware released version 6.4.2 (Build 9643711) of NSX-v. There is a lot of enhancements that Service Providers can take advantage of in this release. The focus seems to be on edge and distributed network services which translates to more power for service providers to create features upon while also meaning they can take advantage of the same enhancements to improve performance and efficiencies within their our virtualised network.

In terms of interoperability, for the moment the latest vSphere 6.7 and 6.5 U2 releases are supported, however vCloud Director is not support at all. Interestingly, only 6.4.0 is supported through the main vCloud Director installs presently installed on service provider platforms.

Networking and Edge Services:

  • Multicast Support: Adds ability to configure L3 IPv4 multicast on Distributed Logical Router and Edge Service Gateway through support of IGMPv2 and PIM Sparse Mode
  • Default Limit of MAC identifiers: Increases from 2048 to 4096
  • Hardware VTEP: Added multi PTEP cluster capability to facilitate environments with multiple vCenters

Security Services:

  • Context-Aware Firewall: Additional Layer 7 Application Context Support (EPIC, MSSQL, BLAST AppIDs)
  • Firewall Rule Hit Count: Monitor rule usage and easily identify unused rules for clean-up
  • Firewall Section Locking: Enables multiple security administrators to work concurrently on the firewall
  • NSX Application Rule Manager: Improved scale to 100 vNICs per session, further simplifying the process of creating security groups and whitelisting firewall rules for existing applications.

Operations and Troubleshooting:

  • Authentication & Authorization: Introduces 2 new roles (Network Engineer and Security Engineer). Adds ability to enable/disable basic authentication.
  • NSX Scale Dashboard: Provides visibility into 25 new metrics. Adds ability to edit usage warning thresholds and filter for objects exceeding limits.
  • NSX Controller Cluster Settings: Specify common settings (DNS, NTP, Syslog) to apply to NSX Controller Cluster
  • Support for VM Hardware version 11 for NSX components: For new installs of NSX 6.4.2, NSX appliances (Manager, Controller, Edge, Guest Introspection) are installed with VM HW version 11.

Also as promised, the improvements to the HTML5 NSX user interface continues. TraceFlow, User Domains, Audit Logs, Events & Tasks have been added to the HTML5 vSphere Client. The other pleasing thing to see is that comparatively speaking the number of resolved issues is much lower than previous releases. This points to the 6.4.x code being a lot more stable and bug free than previous iterations…which is pleasing to see.

There are some changes to consider as well in the 6.4.2 release. Starting with version 6.4.2, when you install NSX on hosts that have physical NICs with ixgbe drivers, Receive Side Scaling (RSS) is not enabled on the ixgbe drivers by default. You must enable RSS manually on the hosts before installing NSX. There is also a change to the API call to set Syslog against the controller. That said, it’s still worth looking through the Known Issues section in the release notes.

Those with the correct entitlements can download NSX-v 6.4.2 here.

References:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-NSX-for-vSphere/6.4/rn/releasenotes_nsx_vsphere_642.html