Tag Archives: VeeamPN

Veeam Powered Network v2 Azure Marketplace Deployment

Last month Veeam PN v2 went GA and was available for download and install from the veeam.com download page. As an update to that, we published v2 to the Azure Marketplace which is now available for deployment. As a quick refresher, Veeam PN was initially released as part of Direct Recovery to Azure and was marketed through the Azure Marketplace. In addition to that, for the initial release I went through a number of use cases for Veeam PN which are all still relevant with the release of v2:

With the addition of WireGuard replacing OpenVPN for site-to-site connectivity the list of use cases will be expanded and the use cased above enhanced. For most of my own use of Veeam PN, I have the Hub living in an Azure Region which I connect up into where ever I am around the world.

Now that the Veeam PN v2 is available from the Azure Marketplace I have created a quick deployment video that can be viewed below. For those that want a more step by step guide as a working example, you can reference this post from v1… essentially the process is the same.

  • Deploy Veeam PN Appliance from Azure Marketplace
  • Perform Initial Veeam PN Configuration to connect Azure
  • Configure SiteGateway and Clients

NOTE: One of the challenges that we introduced by shifting over to WireGuard is that there is no direct upgrade path from v1 to v2. With that, there needs to be a side by side stand up of v2 and v1 to enable a configuration migration… which at the moment if a manual process.

References:

https://anthonyspiteri.net/veeam-powered-network-azure-and-remote-site-configuration/

Using Terraform to Deploy and Configure a Ready to use Backup Repo into an AWS VPC

A month of so ago I wrote a post on deploying Veeam Powered Network into an AWS VPC as a way to extend the VPC network to a remote site to leverage a Veeam Linux Repository running as an EC2 instance. During the course of deploying that solution I came across a lot of little check boxes and settings that needed to by tweaked in order to get things working. After that, I set myself the goal of trying to automate and orchestrate the deployment end to end.

For an overview of the intended purpose behind the solution head to the original blog post here. That post was mainly focused around the Veeam PN component, however I was using that as a mechanism to create a site-to-site connection to allow Veeam Backup & Replication to talk to the other EC2 instance which was the Veeam Linux Repository.

Terraform by HashiCorp:

In order to automate the deployment into AWS, I looked at Cloudformation first…but found that learning curve to be a little steep…so I went back to HashiCorp’s Terraform which I have been familiar with for a number of years, but never gotten my hands dirty with. HashiCorp specialise in Cloud Infrastructure Automation and their provisioning product is called Terraform.

Terraform is used to create, manage, and update infrastructure resources such as physical machines, VMs, network switches, containers, and more. Almost any infrastructure type can be represented as a resource in Terraform.

A provider is responsible for understanding API interactions and exposing resources. Providers generally are an IaaS (e.g. AWS, GCP, Microsoft Azure, OpenStack), PaaS (e.g. Heroku), or SaaS services (e.g. Terraform Enterprise, DNSimple, CloudFlare).

Terraform supports a host of providers and once you wrap your head around the basics and view some example code, provisioning Infrastructure as Code can be achieved with relatively no coding experience…however, as I did find out, you need to be careful in this world and not make the same initial mistake I did as explained in this post.

Going from Manual to Orchestrated with Automation:

The Terraform AWS provider is what I used to create the code required to deploy the required components. Like everything that’s automated, you need to understand the manual process first and that is where the previous experience came in handy. I knew what the end result was…I just needed to work backwards and make sure that the Terraform provider had all the instructions it needed to orchestrate the build.

the basic flow is:

  • Fetch AWS Access Key and Secret
  • Fetch AWS Key Pair
  • Create AWS VPC
    • Configure Networking and Routing for VPC
  • Create CentOS EC2 Instance for Veeam Linux Repo
    • Add new disk and set size
    • Execute configuration script
      • Install PERL modules
  • Create Ubuntu EC2 Instance for Veeam PN
    • Execute configuration script
      • Install VeeamPN modules from repo
  • Login to Veeam PN Web Console and Import Site Configuration.

I’ve uploaded the code to a GitHub project. An overview and instructions for the project can be found here. I’ve also posted a video to YouTube showing the end to end process which i’ve embedded below (best watched at 2x speed):

In order to get the Terraform plan to work there are some variables that need modifying in the GitHub Project and you will need to download, install and initialise Terraform. I’m intending to continue to tweak the project and complete the provisioning end to end, including the Veeam PN site configuration part at the end. The remote execution feature of Terraform allows some pretty cool things by way of script initiation.

References:

https://github.com/anthonyspiteri/automation/aws_create_veeamrepo_veeampn

https://www.terraform.io/intro/getting-started/install.html

 

Veeam Powered Network: Quick Video Walkthrough

Earlier this year at VeeamON we announced Veeam PN as part of the Restore to Microsoft Azure product. While Veeam PN is still in RC, I’ve written a series of posts around how Veeam PN can be used for a number of different use cases (See list below) and at VMworld 2017 I delivered a vBrownBag TechTalk on Veeam Powered Network which goes through an overview of what it is, how it works and an example of how easy it is to setup.

As mentioned, i’ve blogged about the three different use cases talked about in the presentation:

Clink on the links to visit the blog posts that go through each scenario and watch out for news around the GA of Veeam Powered Network happening shortly. Until then, download or deploy the RC from the Veeam.com website or Azure Marketplace and give it a try. Again, it’s free, simple, powerful and a great way to connect or extend networks securely with minimal fuss.

Veeam is now in the Network Game! Introducing Veeam Powered Network.

Today at VeeamON 2017 we announced the Release Candidate of Veeam PN (Veeam Powered Network) which together with our existing feature, Direct Restore to Microsoft Azure creates a new solution called Veeam Disaster Recovery for Microsoft Azure. At the heart of this new solution is Veeam PN which extends an on-premises network to one that’s in Azure enhancing our availability capabilities around disaster recovery.

Veeam PN allows administrators to create, configure and connect site-to-site or point-to-site VPN tunnels easily through an intuitive and simple UI all within a couple of clicks. There are two components to Veeam PN, that being a Hub Appliance that’s deployable from the Azure Marketplace and a Site Gateway that’s downloadable from the veeam.com website and deployable on-premises from an OVA meaning it can be installed onto

Veeam PN for Microsoft Azure (Veeam Powered Network) is a free solution designed to simplify and automate the setup of a disaster recovery (DR) site in Microsoft Azure using lightweight software-defined networking (SDN).

  • Provides seamless and secure networking between on-premises and Azure-based IT resources
  • Delivers easy-to-use and fully automated site-to-site network connectivity between any site

Veeam PN is designed for both SMB and Enterprise customers, as well as service providers.

From my point of view this is a great example of how Veeam is no longer a backup company but a company that’s focused on availability. Networking is still the most complex part of executing a successful disaster recovery plan and with Veeam PN easily extending on-premises networks to DR networks as well as providing connectivity from remote sites back to DR networks via site-to-site connectivity while also providing access for remote endpoints the ability to connect into the HUB appliance and be connected to networking configured via a point-to-site connection.

Look out for more information from myself on Veeam PN as we get closer to GA.