Tag Archives: Amazon

There is still a Sting in the Tail for Cloud Service Providers

This week it gave me great pleasure to see my former employer, Zettagrid announced a significant expansion in their operations, with the addition of three new hosting zones to go along with their existing four zones in Australia and Indonesia. They also announced the opening of operations in the US. Apart from the fact I still have a lot of good friends working at Zettagrid the announcement vindicates the position and role of the boutique Cloud Service Provider in the era of the hyper-scale public cloud providers.

When I decided to leave Zettagrid, I’ll be honest and say that one of the reasons was that I wasn’t sure where the IaaS industry would be placed in five years. That was now, more than three years ago and in that time the industry has pulled back significantly from the previous inferred position of total and complete hyper-scale dominance in the cloud and hosting market.

Cloud is not a Panacea:

The Industry no longer talks about the cloud as a holistic destination for workloads, and more and more over the past couple of years the move has been towards multi and hybrid cloud platforms. VMware has (in my eyes) been the leader of this push but the inflection point came at AWS re:Invent last year, when AWS Outposts was announced. This shift in mindset is driven by the undisputed leader in the public cloud space towards consuming an on-premises resource in a cloud way.

I’ve always been a big supporter of boutique Service Providers and Managed Service Providers… it’s in my blood and my role at Veeam allows me to continue to work with top innovative service providers around the world. Over the past three years, I’ve seen the really successful ones thrive through themselves pivoting by offering their partners and tenants differential services… going beyond just traditional IaaS.

These might be in the form of enhancing their IaaS platform by adding more avenues to consume services. Examples of this are adding APIs, or the ability for the new wave of Infrastructure as Code tools to provision and manage workloads. vCloud Director is a great example of continued enhancement that, upon every releases offers something new to the service provider tenant. The Plugable Extension Architecture now allows service providers to offer new services for backup, Kubernetes and Object Storage.

Backup and Disaster Recovery is Driving Revenue:

A lot of service providers have also transitioned to offering Backup and Disaster Recovery solutions which in many cases has been the biggest growth area for them over the past number of years.  Even with the extreme cheapness that the hyper-scalers offer for the their cloud object storage platform.

All this leads me to believe that there is still a very significant role to be had for Service Providers in conjunction with other cloud platforms for a long time to come. The service providers that are succeeding and growing are not sitting on their hands and expecting what once worked to continue working. The successful service providers are looking at ways to offer more services and continue to be that trusted provider of IT.

I was once told in the early days of my career that if a client has 2.3 products with you, then they are sticky and the likelihood is that you will have them as a customer for a number of years. I don’t know the actual accuracy of that, but I’ve always carried that belief. This flies in the face of modern thinking around service mobility which has been reinforced by the improvement in underlying network technologies to allow the portability and movement of workloads. This also extends to the ease to which a modern application can be provisioned, managed and ultimately migrated. That said, all service providers want their tenants to be sticky and not move.

There is a Future!

Whether it be through continuing to evolve existing service offerings, adding more ways to consume their platform, becoming a broker for public cloud services or being a trusted final destination for backup and Disaster Recovery, the talk about the hyper-scalers dominating the market is currently not a true reflection of the industry… and that is a good thing!

How to Copy Amazon S3 Buckets with AWS CLI

I am doing some work on validated restore scenarios using the new Veeam Cloud Tier that backed by an Object Storage Repository pointing at an Amazon S3 Bucket. So that I am not messing with the live data I wanted a way to copy and access the objects from another bucket or folder. There is no option at the moment to achieve this via the AWS Console, however it can be done via the AWS CLI.

First step was to ensure I had the AWS CLI installed on my MBP and it was at the latest version:

For the first part of the copy process, I cheated and created a new Bucket from the AWS Console that was based on the one I wanted to copy.

Next step is to make sure that the AWS CLI is configured with the correct AWS Access and Secret keys. Once done, the command to copy/sync buckets is a simple one.

Obviously the time to complete the operation will depend on the amount of Objects in the Bucket and whether its cross region or local. It took about 4 hours to copy across ~50GB of data from US-EAST-2 to US-WEST-2 going at about 4MB/s. By default the process is shown on the screen.

Once the first pass was complete I ran the same command again which will this time look for differences between the source and destination and only sync the differences. You can run the command below to view the Total Objects and Total Size of both buckets for comparison.

That is it! Pretty simple process. I’ll blog around the actual reason behind the Veeam Cloud Tier requirement and put this into action at a later date!

References:

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/cli/latest/userguide/install-macos.html

https://aws.amazon.com/premiumsupport/knowledge-center/move-objects-s3-bucket

AWS Outposts and VMware…Hybridity Defined!

Now that AWS re:Invent 2018 has well and truly passed…the biggest industry shift to come out of the event from my point of view was the fact that AWS are going full guns blazing into the on-premises world. With the announcement of AWS Outposts the long held belief that the public cloud is the panacea of all things became blurred. No one company has pushed such a hard cloud only message as AWS…no one company had the power to change the definition of what it is to run cloud services…AWS did that last week at re:Invent.

Yes, Microsoft have had the Azure Stack concept for a number of years now, however they have not executed on the promise of that yet. Azure Stack is seen by many as a white elephant even though it’s now in the wild and (depending on who you talk to) doing relatively well in certain verticals. The point though is that even Microsoft did not have the power to make people truely believe that a combination of a public cloud and on premises platform was the path to hybridity.

AWS is a Juggernaut and it’s my belief that they now have reached an inflection point in mindshare and can now dictate trends in our industry. They had enough power for VMware to partner with them so VMware could keep vSphere relevant in the cloud world. This resulted in VMware Cloud on AWS. It seems like AWS have realised that with this partnership in place, they can muscle their way into the on-premises/enterprise world that VMware have and still dominate…at this stage.

Outposts as a Product Name is no Accident

Like many, I like the product name Outposts. It’s catchy and straight away you can make sense of what it is…however, I decided to look up the offical meaning of the word…and it makes for some interesting reading:

  • An isolated or remote branch
  • A remote part of a country or empire
  • A small military camp or position at some distance from the main army, used especially as a guard against surprise attack

The first definition as per the Oxford Dictionary fits the overall idea of AWS Outposts. Putting a compute platform in an isolated or remote branch office that is seperate to AWS regions while also offering the ability to consume that compute platform like it was an AWS region. This represents a legitimate use case for Outposts and can be seen as AWS fulling a gap in the market that is being craved for by shifting IT sentiment.

The second definition is an interesting one when taken in the context of AWS and Amazon as a whole. They are big enough to be their own country and have certainly built up an empire over the last decade. All empires eventually crumble, however AWS is not going anywhere fast. This move does however indicate a shift in tactics and means that AWS can penetrate the on-premises market quicker to extend their empire.

The third definition is also pertinent in context to what AWS are looking to achieve with Outposts. They are setting up camp and positioning themselves a long way from their traditional stronghold. However my feeling is that they are not guarding against an attack…they are the attack!

Where does VMware fit in all this?

Given my thoughts above…where does VMware fit into all this? At first when the announcement was made on stage I was confused. With Pat Gelsinger on stage next to Andy Jessy my first impression was that VMware had given in. Here was AWS announcing a direct competitive platform to on-premises vSphere installations. Not only that, but VMware had announced Project Dimension at VMworld a few months earlier which looked to be their own on-premises managed service offering…though the wording around that was for edge rather than on-premises.

With the initial dust settled and after reading this blog post from William Lam, I came to understand the VMware play here.

VMware and Amazon are expanding their partnership to deliver a new, as-a-service, on-premises offering that will include the full VMware SDDC stack (vSphere, NSX, vSAN) running on AWS Outposts, a fully managed and configurable server and network installation built with AWS-designed hardware. VMware Cloud in AWS Outposts is VMware’s new As-a-Service offering in partnership with AWS to run on AWS Outposts – it will leverage the innovations we’ve developed with Project Dimension and apply them on top of AWS Outposts. VMware Cloud on AWS Outposts will be a subscription-based service and will support existing VMware payment options.

The reality is that on-premises environments are not going away any time soon but customers like the operating model of the cloud. More and more they don’t care about where infrastructure lives as long as a services outcome is achieved. Customers are after simplicity and cost efficiency. Outposts delivers all this by enabling convenience and choice…the choice to run VMware for traditional workloads using the familiar VMware SDDC stack all while having access to native AWS services.

A Managed Service Offering means a Mind shift

The big shift here from VMware that began with VMware Cloud on AWS is a shift towards managed services. A fundamental change in the mindset of the customer in the way in which they consume their infrastructure. Without needing to worry about the underlying platform, IT can focus on the applications and the availability of those applications. For VMware this means from the VM up…for AWS, this means from the platform up.

VMware Cloud on AWS is a great example of this new managed services world, with VMware managing most of the traditional stack. VMware can now extend VMware Cloud on AWS to Outposts to boomerang the management of on-premises as well. Overall Outposts is a win win for both AWS and VMware…however proof will be in the execution and uptake. We won’t know how it all pans out until the product becomes available…apparently in the later half of 2019.

IT admins have some contemplating to do as well…what does a shift to managed platforms mean for them? This is going to be an interesting ride as it pans out over the next twelve months!

References:

VMware Cloud on AWS Outposts: Cloud Managed SDDC for your Data Center