Category Archives: Cloud Connect

Quick Fix – Backup for Office 365 Self Service Recovery Fails with Incompatible Version

A couple of weeks ago we released version 2.0 of Veeam Backup for Office 365 which added support for SharePoint and OneDrive. Earlier this year I wrote about the awesome self service capabilities that are included for Veeam Cloud and Service Providers in the VBO platform, and also the huge opportunity that exists in the provider space to offer backup service for Exchange. Add to that SharePoint and OneDrive and that opportunity only gets bigger.

I’m putting together a couple of posts around the self service of SharePoint and OneDrive in the 2.0 release, but in the meantime this is a very quick fix post for those that might be getting the below error when trying to connect to service provider endpoints running VBO services for Exchange Online.

Incompatible Veeam Backup for Office 365 server version, received 9.6.3.567, expected 9.6.0.1308

To resolve this issue, then tenant needs to download the VBO 2.0 download package and install the new version of the Veeam Explorer for Microsoft Exchange that’s included in the release.

This will update the existing Explorer version from that distributed with Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5. The awesome thing about getting the upgrade as part of the VBO 2.0 package is that for the 1.5 release where self service was first introduced, tenants had to wait for Update 3 for Backup & Replication to consume the service.

Once this has been updated you can once again connect to the Cloud Connect infrastructure of the Service Provider that allows the self service recoverability function to take place.

Upgrading Windows Agents with Veeam Availability Console

One of the Veeam Availability Console’s key features is it’s ability to deploy and manage Veeam Agent for Windows. This is done through the VAC Web Console and is achieved through the connectivity of the providers Cloud Connect Gateway to the tenant’s Veeam Backup & Replication instance. Weather this is managed by a service provider or by the tenant, VAC also has the ability to remotely upgrade Windows Agents.

The way that this works is by the Veeam Availability Console periodically connecting to the Veeam Update Server and checks whether a new version of the agent software is available. If a new version is available, VAC displays a warning next to the agents saying that it is outdated as shown below.

Updating the backup agents from the Veeam Update Server is performed via the master agent that sits on-premises. This agent is deployed during the initial Service Provider configuration form the Veeam Backup & Replication server. The master agent downloads the backup agent setup file from the Veeam Update Server and then uploads this setup file to systems selected via the update scope and initiates the update.

To initiate the upgrade, select the agents from the Backup Agents Tab under Clients -> Discovery. Once selected click on the Backup Agent dropdown and click upgrade.

Note: Once you click Upgrade the process will be kicked off…there is no further confirmation. There is also a Patch option which allows you to apply patches to the agents in between major build releases.

Once initiated, all agents will be shown as updating as shown below.

Taking a look at the Resource Monitor of one of the endpoints being updated, you can see that the machine is receiving the update from the local server that has the master agent and that the agent is talking back to the VAC server via Cloud Connect Port 6180.

And you can see the Windows Installer running the agent update msi.

Back to the VAC console, and after a while you will see the update deployment status complete

And the endpoint now has the updated agent version running.

Which is reflected in the VAC Console.

Conclusion:

That’s the very straight forward process of having the Veeam Availability Console upgrade Veeam Windows Agents under it’s management. Again, this can be done by the service provider or it’s a task that can be executed by the tenant through their own console login given the correct permissions. There are a few other options for those that deployed the agents with the help of a 3rd party tool and also for those doing it offline…for a run down of that process, head to the help pages linked below.

References:

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/vac/provider_admin/update_backup_agents.html?ver=20

Office 365 Backups and the Opportunity that Exists for Service Providers

In recent weeks i’ve become reacquainted with an old friend…There was a time where eighty to ninety percent of my day job was working in and around Exchange Server. If I had started this blog in 2005 it would have been dominated with posts around the Hosting of Exchange Server and probably be named Exchange is Life!. I take pride in my Hosted Exchange Org and User creation scripts that I created before Hosting Control Panels where even a thing.

Over the last five or six years my interest in Exchange diminished due to moving roles and also due to some lingering ill feelings about the way in which Microsoft treated their initial Hosting partners as they started what would become, Office 365 back in the late 2000’s. That said I have remained aware of the Exchange landscape and while there is still a lot of on-premises Exchange instances and still a number of decent Hosted Exchange providers out there, there is no stopping Office 365’s growth.

I even jumped on the bandwagon by moving my personal SliemaLabs domain over to an Office 365 Exchange subscription late last year. That domain initially lived on an Exchange Server I ran from home, and then on a Hosted Exchange platform I built and now it’s completed it’s own journey to Office 365.

Having spent a bit of time recently looking at the 1.5 version of our Backup for Microsoft Office 365 product…more specifically the new self service feature that came in Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 3. I’ve had a renewed sense of purpose around the Exchange ecosystem…and that purpose is to ensure that all service providers understand the opportunity that exists around creating offerings for the backing up and availability of Office365 services.

This post follows a post that was released on the Veeam.com blog by Paul Mattes (VP of Global Cloud Group at Veeam) talking about the success of our Backup for Microsoft Office 365 product.

In 2017, more than 25,000 organizations installed our Office 365 backup solution, representing 2.3 million Microsoft Office mailboxes. We saw a staggering 327% quarter-over-quarter growth in Q4 of last year.

And the reasons why all Office 365 users should consider an external backup solution for their data hosted in Microsoft’s SaaS cloud platform.

It’s important to remember that SaaS platform providers, like Microsoft Office 365, take on the responsibility of application uptime and the underlying infrastructure. But it is the customer’s responsibility to manage and protect their vital business data.

This is public cloud in a nutshell…Ultimately the customer has the responsibility to ensure all data is backed up correctly. I won’t go into the technical aspects as to why Office 365 requires additional backups solutions. There a plenty of good online resources, a Gartner report is available here Microsoft’s has an offical page on High Availability and Business Continuity guide. Doing research into the nature of SaaS you understand the need for third party backup solutions.

The Office 365 Opportunity:

From a service provider point of view there is an opportunity to tap into the 85 million user Exchange Online market and offer availability services for organisations using Office 365. This is a multi-billion dollar market that exists today and services based around backup and management of that data are central to tapping into that opportunity. Just breaking down the ANZ market alone, there are approximately 4.25 million Office 365 users of which if only 5% was captured would represent a combined 3.5 to 5 million dollar market.

For those VCSPs who have already deployed Cloud Connect and offering Backup services, the ground work has been laid with regards to having the infrastructure in place to extend that service to offer Veeam Backup for Office 365 aaS.

The billable components of this service are licenses and then storage costs. Managed Service Providers can also build in management fees that offer an end to end solution for their clients. Where it should be seen to be extremely attractive for VCPSs is in the potential for the storage revenue to be significant early and then continue to grow as tenant’s backup and retain more and more mailboxes in addition to new tenants coming on board.

We have given our VCSPs the tools to be able to build a strong service around Office 365 backups with the 1.5 release of Backup for Office 365 focused on scalability and automation. Add to that the self service feature that came in Update 3 for Backup & Replication and there is no excuse to not start thinking about offering this as a service.

Looking beyond Exchange Online, version 2 of Backup for Office 365 will include the ability to backup SharePoint and OneDrive as well…have a think about what that represents in terms of revenue opportunities just on the potential for storage consumption alone.

Again, I want to emphasis that this market is huge and what’s on offer in terms of potential revenue can’t be ignored. I’m excited about the next 12-18 months in being able to see our VCSPs grab this opportunity…don’t let it slip!

References:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/exchange-online-high-availability-and-business-continuity.aspx

The Limitations of Microsoft Office 365 Backup

 

 

Configuring Service Provider Self Service Recovery with Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365

For a while now I’ve talked about the increasing functionality of the the Cloud Connect Gateway and that it is central to a lot of features and services that exist within Veeam Backup & Replication. With the release of 9.5 Update 3 we added a feature that allows multi-tenant self service recoverability of a tenants Office365 mailbox backup hosted by Veeam Cloud and Service Providers utilising Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 1.5 that was released late last year.

Overview:

Tenant admins communicate with the Service Provider via the Cloud Gateway component which handles flow of data. The Service Provider grants the ability to their tenants so that each tenant can perform self restore operations using Veeam Explorer for Microsoft Exchange. By default, tenants are not able to restore anything from the backup without a Service Provider assistance.

The steps above show the self restore scenarios performed by the Tenant:

  • Tenants use Veeam Explorer for Microsoft Exchange to send restore requests via Veeam Cloud Gateway directly to the Service Provider.
  • On the Service Provider side, Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 management server detects a proxy server responsible for processing tenant data.
  • Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 management server locates an associated repository that contains a backup file that belongs to the Tenant.
  • Corresponding backup data is then transferred back to the tenant via Veeam Cloud Gateway.

IMPORTANT!

When planning solution components deployment, remember that Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 v1.5 and Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 3 must be installed on the same server.

Example:

These days I don’t have access to a local Exchange Server or to a corporate Exchange Online instance but I did migrate my personal domain over to Office365 just before Christmas. That account has only one mailbox, but that’s enough to demonstrate the Office365 Service Provider backup and tenant self service recovery use case.

Service Provider Side:

For Service Providers to backup tenants on-premises or Office 365 Exchange mailboxes they need to first configure a new organization in Veeam Backup for Office 365. I’m not going to go through the steps for that as it’s been covered in other posts and is very simple to configure, however to prepare for the self service capability the service provider needs to ensure that the Cloud Connect Gateways are setup and configured and accessible externally.

In Backup for Office 365 you have to enable and configure the RestAPI and Authentication Settings under their respective tabs in the Options menu. This includes selecting an SSL certificate for both services…I’m just using a self signed certificate but obviously service providers will want a correctly signed public certificate to productise this feature.

With the organization configured I created a new job and backed up the Exchange Organization. Again, for this example I just have the one mailbox but the theory is the same weather it’s one, five, fifty or five thousand mailboxes.

From here, without any self service configured the Service Provider can access the mailboxe(s) to perform whole or granular item level recovery using the Veeam Explorer for Exchange. As shown below I can access any mailbox from the service provider’s end and perform recovery to a number of different locations

For each tenant (not per Exchange User) there needs to be a Cloud Connect tenant account created on the Backup & Replication server. This will be used at the tenant end by the admin to configure a Service Provider in the Backup & Replication console which will then be detected and used by the Veeam Explorer for Exchange to use to connect into the service provider and authenticate with an applicable Exchange account.

Tenant End:

For the tenant admin to use Veeam Explorer for Exchange to perform mailbox recovery you first have to configure a Service Provider using Cloud Connect tenant credentials as provided by the Service Provider. It’s worth mentioning here that you can have no license installed in Backup & Replication and are still able to add a Service Provider to the Backup Infrastructure menu. Once connected, firing up the Explorer for Exchange you will use the Service Provider option in the Add Store dropdown.

In the drop down list, select the Service Provider account configured in the Backup Infrastructure menu. If multiple exist you will see each one in the drop down. You also configure the username and password that connects to the Exchange Organization. This can be an admin account that is allowed impersonation, or you can enter in an individual account.

Once connected (which can take some time with the GUI of the Explorer for Exchange) any mailbox that the account has authorization over will be seen and mailbox recovery can begin.

An interesting thing to do is to check what is happening from a network connectivity point of view during this process. While performing a restore you can see open connections from the tenant side to Cloud Connect gateway on port 6180 and also you can see a connection to Office365 on port 443 completing the loop.

Back at the Service Provider end in the Backup for Office365 console you can see active Explorer for Exchange sessions as running jobs. Below you can see the local one, plus a remote session.

Automation:

For Service Providers with the capability to automate the setup and provisioning of these services through PowerShell or the RestAPIs here is a great example of what can be achieved with Backup for Office365 and the creation of a self service portal web interface. You can use the built in Swagger UI to evaluate the capabilities of RestAPIs.

The Swagger UI can be accessed via the following URL:

https://<Backup-Office365>:<Port>/swagger/ui/index

From there you can authenticate and work through the live examples.

Conclusion:

The market for Office365 backups is significant and we have built in some pretty cool technology into Backup & Replication that works with Backup for Office365 that allows easy, self service capabilities that can be productized by Service Providers out of the box. Not only can Service Providers offer services to backup client Exchange Organisations but they can also extend that to offer self service which increases overall operational efficiencies at the provider end while also offering enhanced services to clients.

References:

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/vbo365/guide/vbo_mail_baas.html?ver=15

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/vbo365/rest/swaggerui.html?ver=15

Creating a Custom Cloud Connect Maintenance Mode Message

Last week I wrote an article on Maintenance Modes in Cloud Connect and also Veeam Availability Console. For Cloud Connect there is a default error message that get’s shown in the Job Status if any jobs are started if the Cloud Connect Maintenance Mode is turned on.

We have the ability to customize that message via a registry key addition as documented in the online Veeam Help Centre.

To create a custom Maintenance mode notification, on the SP Veeam backup server, create the new registry value HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Veeam\Veeam Backup and Replication\CloudMaintenanceModeMessage = <message> (String), where <message> is a Maintenance mode notification that you want to display on the tenant side.

Adding the key via Registry Editor is simple enough and this is what you are left with from within the Registry Editor.

And the error message at the tenant end now reflects the custom message.

To make this easier for Service Providers, i’ve written a quick PowerShell script that does a couple of things. The first thing is report on the current registry value for the Maintenance Mode and then give you the option to delete the key and return the message to it’s default state. The second thing it does is prompt you enter in the desired custom message and set that in the registry.

References:

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/cloud/cc_maintenance_message.html?ver=95

Cloud Connect and VAC Portal Maintenance Modes

Lately i’ve been digging deeper into the Veeam Availability Console and have been wrapping my head around it’s extended feature set. With that I thought it would be good to start a series of short blog posts pointing out examples of how certain parts are configured and what is happening under the covers. To kick things off I am going to talk about Maintenance Modes in VAC and also how it translates back to Cloud Connect Maintenance mode and also start off by covering that new Update 3 feature.

Maintenance Mode for Cloud Connect in Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 3

In Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 3 we introduced a Maintenance Mode feature for Cloud Connect. In a nutshell this makes the Service Provider cloud resources unavailable for tenants to perform backup or backup copy job operations. This is true for jobs running on Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 3, Agent for Windows 2.1 and Agent for Linux 2.0.

To enable Maintenance Mode from the VBR console Right Click on the Cloud Connect top level tree item and click on Maintenance Mode

Read the message and click Yes

Once completed you should see the following status in the Cloud Connect menu tree

You can also set and check this state in PowerShell

Once triggered, any running jobs are gracefully stopped. Within that the current task is allowed to complete but all subsequent jobs will fail. In the case of an agent the whole job is allowed to complete. Any new backup or backup copy job that tries to start after Maintenance Mode has been initialed will fail with an error which is shown below.

Tying this into the Veeam Availability Console you can also trigger Maintenance Mode from the VAC UI. To enable maintenance mode for Veeam Cloud Connect, log in to Veeam Availability Console as a Portal Administrator and at the top right corner click Configuration and under Portal Configuration click Cloud Connect Server and click Enable Maintenance Mode.

Click Yes to confirm the operation.

The message isn’t 100% correct based on what I talked about earlier. The current job task will be completed and not dropped as suggested here.

You can disable Maintenance Mode by clicking on the menu option if it’s enabled.

Maintenance Mode for Veeam Availability Portal UI

For those times when you may need to perform configuration changes or OS updates to the system hosting the VAC Portal you have the ability to put the portal its self into maintenance mode. When enabled, all users will not be able to login to the portal remotely and you will see a message on the welcome page as shown below.

To toggle this setting go to the top right of the VAC console and click Configuration and then under Server Settings click on Settings and go to the Maintenance Mode Tab. Set the toggle to on or off to enable or disable and click save.

Once in Maintenance Mode you can only log back into the portal from the local console of the server hosting the VAC UI role. Note that while under Maintenance Mode you can only modify the SQL Server Configuration or toggle Maintenance Mode off.

Conclusion:

I’ve gone through the Maintenance Mode options for both Veeam Availability Console and Cloud Connect and how each one is enabled and what their purpose is. For the moment, in Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 3 the Maintenance Mode is limited to Backup and Backup copy job operations. There are a other operations that are not currently impacted by this mode such as vCloud Director backups or Cloud Connect Replication operations however this will be looked at in upcoming releases.

To read more about Maintenance Mode head to the Veeam Help Documentation page here.

References:

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/cloud/cc_maintenance_mode.html?ver=95

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/vac/enterprise_admin/enable_disable_vac_maintenance_mode.html?ver=20

A Deeper Look at Insider Protection in 9.5 Update 3

With the release of Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 3 we introduced the concept of a Recycle Bin for customers sending offsite cloud backups to VCSPs using Veeam Cloud Connect. This deleted backup protection…or Insider Protection allows the VCSP to enable the deleted backups protection option for specific tenants and looks to add another level of data security for cloud based backups in the case of a malicious user gaining access to the Backup & Replication Console or in the case of accidental deletion by an administrator.

As shown above, this is set by checking a box (Also via PowerShell) in the properties of the tenant account. Once checked the SP will choose the retention period by setting the Keep deleted Backup files for <N> days option. With this option enabled, when a backup or a specific restore point in the backup chain is deleted or aged out from the cloud repository. The actual backup files are not deleted immediately, instead, they are moved to a _RecycleBin folder on the repositories.

Once moved, backup files in the recycle bin do not consume tenant quota however they obviously consume general storage. With that in mind it should be considered by the SP to charge for that used storage. I will release a post shortly detailing some tips on how best to size and charge for the recycle bin storage per client.

At the tenant end those backup files that are moved into the recycle bin are not registered and will not show up in the job information window. They can’t access or do anything with the files in the recycle bin. For the moment if a tenant wants to restore data they must contact the SP to obtain the necessary backup files. Once the retention period has expired all files that fall out of that period are deleted.

Basic Mechanics:

When the option is checked for a tenant a new folder is created under the _RecycleBin\<tenant> folder of the repository. In the case of a Scale Out Backup Repository there is a recycle bin folder created per extent which ensured that any split tenant VM files are processed locally and not between extents.

Once files in the repository start to age out the tenant folder will start to populate with backup files. If there is an event that triggers a change of retention or a VM removed from a job or the deletion of a whole job, any remaining VBK or VIB files in the tenant repository are moved into the recycle bin.

The files remain in the _RecycleBin folder until the retention period has passed or if the service provider moves them out of the folder for recovery purposes.

Working Example:

I have a Cloud Connect Backup account that I am using to back up five VMs that reside on premises, using a standard Backup Job with Forward Incrementals and a Synthetic Full done once a week. I have configured this job to keep two restore points.

I then have configured a secondary destination for the job via a Backup Copy Job to the Cloud Repository and I have set a GFS to happen weekly so I have a full archive offsite. If I hadn’t enabled GFS retention (for those running Update 3) a warning would appear as shown below.

Tip: If the tenant plans to create off-site copies of backed-up data with a backup copy job, it should enable GFS retention settings in the job properties. This way, Veeam Backup & Replication will be able to protect backups created by the job against an attack when a hacker reduces the job’s retention policy and creates a few incremental backups to remove backed-up data from the backup chain.

The Cloud Connect Tenant account has a deleted backup protection setting of 2 days configured as shown in the first image of this post.

Below is the local jobs folder structure:

Looking at the Cloud Connect repository (split over two SOBR extents) you can see that the main repository holds the VM backup files as per the job configuration. Notice the GFS _W files there as well.

Taking a look at the _RecycleBin folder for the tenant after a few days the aged out incremental will start to appear in the folder. Notice that there are no full backup files in the recycle bin at this stage.

Tip: The retention period will look at all backup jobs completed in a 24 hours period and have any expiring or deleted backup files moved into the recycle bin directory. This means that if you are copying up VMs that have a local backup interval of every 4 hours you will have six lots of backup files ageing out daily.

In this example I’m simulating an malicious attack or accidental deletion the VM (TPM03-RMQ-01/VM-120) from the backup. For the sake of this example we are deleting the VM from the Backup & Replication Console under Backups and Cloud. If the Included Archived copies option was chosen then the GFS weekly full backup file is also moved into the recycle bin.

Once the deletion process has been completed the _RecycleBin folder for the tenant will now be populated with the deleted full, plus three incremental files. If the Included Archived copies option was chosen then the GFS weekly full backup file is also moved into the recycle bin.

These will stay in the recycle bin until the retention period is met. From here these files can be transported back to the tenant to be recovered (see here for full process) from within the on-premises Backup & Replication console.

Conclusion:

As shown above, deleted backup protection or Insider Protection is an excellent enhancement to Cloud Connect Backup. It goes some way to having an air gapped backup in the cloud and protects against malicious attacks and rogue or clumsy administrators. There is a lot happening behind the scenes to make it work, however the concept is simple and this features extends the 3-2-1 rule by protecting that offsite copy as part of the Cloud Connect solution. VCSP’s should be looking to offer this as a value add to their clients and Veeam customers should be looking to take advantage of Cloud Connect Backup and Replication for their offsite backup and replication needs.

References:

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/cloud/cloud_connect_bin.html?ver=95

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/cloud/cloud_connect_bin_restore.html?ver=95

VCSP Important Notice: 9.5 Update 3 RTM Is Out…With Insider Protection and more!

Earlier this week, Veeam made available to our VCSP partners the RTM of Update 3 for Backup & Replication 9.5 (Build 9.5.0.1335). Update 3 is what we term a breaking update, meaning that if a Cloud Connect tenant upgrades from any previous 9.5 version before VCSPs this will break backup or replication functionality. With that in mind the RTM has been made available for our VCSP partners to ensure it is installed and tested before being pushed out to production before the GA release. Veeam Backup & Replication releases from 8.0 (build 8.0.0.2084) can write backups to a cloud repository on 9.5 Update 3, and any release from 9.0 (build 9.0.0.902) can write replicas to a cloud host on 9.5 Update 3.

Update 3 is a very significant update and contains a number of enhancements and known issue fixes with a lot of those enhancements aimed at improving the scalability of the Backup & Replication platform that VCSPs can take advantage of. One important note is around new licensing for Cloud Connect Backup that all VCSPs should be aware of. There is a detailed post in the VCSP Forums and there will be emails sent to explains the changes.

We have also pushed out a number new features for our VCSPs with two of them highlighted below. One of which is the new Insider Protection feature or Recycle Bin for Cloud Connect Backups and the other is the a long awaited ask from our providers in the Maintenance Mode for Cloud Connect.

  • Insider protection: Option to hold backups deleted from a tenant’s cloud repository in a “recycle bin” folder for a designated period of time. For more information, see this post in the VCSP forum.

    • Maintenance Mode: Allows you to temporarily stop tenant backup and backup copy tasks from writing to cloud repositories. Already running tenant tasks are allowed to finish, but new tenant tasks fail with an error message indicating that the service provider infrastructure is undergoing maintenance. This is supported at the tenant end in 9.5 Update 3 GA, Agent for Windows 2.1 and Agent for Linux 2.0.

There has also been a lot of work to improve and enhance scalability in the Backup & Replication Cloud Connect functionality to accomodate the increasing usage of Veeam Agent for Windows of which there is a new version (2.1) coming in early December and prepare for the release of Veeam Agent for Linux (2.0) that will include support for backups to be sent to Cloud Connect repositories. For the recently released Veeam Availability Console, Update 3 is 100% compatible with the 2.0 GA (Build 2.0.1.1319) released last week and is good from Update 2 or later.

Conclusion:

Once again, Update 3 for Veeam Backup & Replication is an important update to apply for VCSPs running Cloud Connect services in preparation for the GA release which will happen in about two weeks. Once released I’ll link to the VeeamKB for a detailed look at the fixes but for the moment, if you have the ability to download the update do so and have it applied to your instances. For more info in the RTM, head to the VCSP Forum post here.

Veeam Availability Console – What’s in it for Service Providers

Today, the Veeam Availability Console was made GA meaning that after a long wait our new multi-tenant service provider management and reporting platform is available for download. VAC is an significant evolution of the Managed Backup Portal that was released in 2016 and acts as a central portal for Veeam Cloud and Service Providers to remotely manage and monitor customer instances of Backup & Replication including the ability to monitor Cloud Connect Backup and Replication jobs and failover plans. It also is the central mechanism to deploy and manage (Windows) agents which includes the ability to install agents onto on-premises machines and apply policies to those agents once deployed.

Veeam® Availability Console is a cloud-enabled platform built specifically for Veeam Cloud & Service Provider (VCSP) partners and resellers looking to launch a managed services business. Through its ability to remotely provision, manage and monitor virtual, physical and cloud-based Veeam environments without any special connectivity requirements, Veeam Availability Console enables you to increase revenue and add value to all your customers.

  • Simplified Setup – now allowing on-premises installs
  • Remote backup agent management and monitoring
  • Remote discovery and deployment with enhanced support for Veeam Cloud Connect
  • Web-based multi-tenant portal
  • Native billing and RESTful APIs
Cloud Connect Requirement:

The Cloud Connect Gateway is central to how the Veeam Availability Console operates and all management traffic is tunneled through the Cloud Connect Gateways. If you are a current VCSP offering Cloud Connect services then you already have the infrastructure in place to facilitate VAC, however if you are not a Cloud Connect partner you can apply for a special key that will enable you to deploy a Gateway without the need for specific Cloud Connect backup or Replication licenses.

For a deeper look at VAC architecture for Service Providers, head to Luca Dell’Oca’s VAC series here.

Designed for Service Providers First:

The Veeam Availability Console was designed from the ground up for Service Providers (there is an Enterprise version available) and contains a rich set of APIs that can be consumed for automation and provisioning purposes. There is also a three tier multi-tenancy design allowing VCSPs the ability to create restricted accounts for their partners or resellers from which in turn, another level of accounts can be created for their customers or tenants.

The multi-tenancy aspect means that partners/resellers and customers can control their own backups centrally from the console. Reporting on backup jobs can be viewed and a mechanism to control those jobs is available allowing retry/stop/start tasks against those jobs. If that’s not enough control or more troubleshooting on failed jobs needs to be done the Remote Console feature introduced in Veeam Backup & Replication Update 2 has been integrated into the console.

VAC also includes built in reporting and billing functionality which enables VCSPs who don’t have the capability for automated reporting and billing to offer that to their customers. The reporting can be accessed via the API meaning that if an existing billing engine is being used there is the possibility to have that interface with VAC to pull out key data points.

The Service Provider Opportunity:

Over the past year I’ve talked a lot about the opportunity that exists for Veeam’s Cloud and Service Providers to take advantage of the opportunity that exists with Veeam’s Agents to capture backups for workloads that previously were out of reach. VAC is central to this and opens up the ability to backup instances that live on-premises (physical or virtual) or in any public cloud hyper-scaler or otherwise.

If you are a reseller looking to cash in on the growing data availability market then you should be looking at how VAC can help you get started by leveraging the features mentioned above . Secondly, if you a reseller and not running Cloud Connect Backup or Replication then the time is right to start looking at getting Cloud Connect deployed and start generating revenue around backup and replication services.

For those existing VCSPs that are offering Cloud Connect services, adding VAC into the mix will allow you to take advantage of the agent opportunity that exists as shown above while also adding value to your existing Managed Backup and Cloud Connect services.

References and Product Guides:

https://www.veeam.com/vac_2_0_release_notes_rn.pdf

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/vac/deployment/about.html?ver=20

https://www.veeam.com/availability-console-service-providers-faq.html

https://www.veeam.com/vac_2_0_whats_new_wn.pdf

Awarded vExpert Cloud – A New vExpert Sub Program

Last week Corey Romero announced the inaugural members of the vExpert Cloud sub-program. This is the third vExpert sub-program following the vSAN and NSX programs announced last year. There are 135 initial vExpert Cloud members who have been awarded the title. As it so happens I am now a member of all three which reflects on the focus I’ve had and still have around VMware’s cloud, storage and networking products leading up to and after my move to Veeam last year.

Even with my move, that hasn’t stopped me working around these VMware vertices as Veeam works closely with VMware to offer supportability and integration with vCloud Director as well as being certified with vSAN for data protection. And more recently as it pertains specifically to the vExpert Cloud program, we are going to be supporting vCloud
Director in v10 of Backup & Replication for Cloud Connect Replication and also at VMworld 2017 we where announced as a launch partner for data protection for VMware Cloud on AWS.

For those wondering what does it take to be a part of the vExpert Cloud program:

We are looking for vExperts who are evangelizing VMware Cloud and delivering on the principles of the multi-cloud world being the new normal. Specificity we are looking for community activities which follow the same format as the vExpert program (blogs, books, videos, public speaking, VMUG Leadership, conference sessions speaking and so on).

And in terms of the focus of the vExpert Cloud program:

The program is focused on VMware Cloud influencer activities, VMware, AWS and other cloud environments and use of the products and services in way that delivers the VMware Cloud reality of consistency across multi-cloud environments.

Again, thank you to Corey and team for the award and I look forward to continuing to spread the community messaging around Cloud, NSX and vSAN.

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