Search Results for: Cloud Tier

#TFD20 Follow Up – Veeam Cloud Tier Glossary

Yesterday I presented at Tech Field Day 20. My first topic was on the enhancements we are bringing to Cloud Tier in our Backup & Replication v10 release. Rick Vanover setup the v10 enhancement session by doing some ground work on what a Scale Out Backup Repository is and briefly went over the initial features of Cloud Tier released in Backup & Replication Update 4.

We had a few questions around some of the terminology being used with regards to the Cloud Tier so I thought as a followup I would list out the glossary of terminology I’ve been building since the Update 4 release with the additions of the new v10 enhancements.

  • Cloud Tier – Cloud Tier is the name given to this feature in Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4
  • Object Storage Repository – Object Storage Repository is the name given to a repository that is backed by Amazon S3, Azure Blob or IBM Cloud
  • Scale Out Backup Repository (SOBR) – Scale-Out Backup Repository is a Veeam feature first introduced in Veeam Backup & Replication v9. It consists of one or more Performance Tier extents and exactly one Capacity Tier extent.
  • Capacity Tier – Capacity Tier is the name given to extent on a SOBR using an Object Storage Repository.
  • Performance Tier – Name given to the one or more extents on a SOBR using a standard backup repository
  • Move Mode – Name given to a policy introduced in Update 4 that offloads data from sealed chains and has it in either Performance or Capacity Tier
  • Copy Mode – Name given to policy coming in v10 that immediately duplicates backup files from Performance to Capacity Tier once a backup job has completed
  • Offload Job – Name given to the process that moves data from Performance to Capacity Tier
  • Immutability Period – New feature coming in v10 that sets an Amazon S3 or S3 Compatible Object Lock on blocks copied or moved from the Performance or Capacity Tier protecting them against accidental or malicious deletion.

In addition to that, I have pasted a link to the offical Deep Dive Veeam Whitepaper for Cloud Tier that goes into the why the what and the how of the Cloud Tier and dives into the innovative technologies we have built into the feature.

White Paper Link: https://www.veeam.com/wp-cloud-tier-deep-dive.html

If you want to catch the Cloud Field Day 5 presentation on Cloud Tier, as well as the most recent one yesterday at Tech Field Day 20, I have embedded them below.

First Look: On Demand Recovery with Cloud Tier and VMware Cloud on AWS

Since Veeam Cloud Tier was released as part of Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4, i’ve written a lot about how it works and what it offers in terms of offloading data from more expensive local storage to what is fundamentally cheaper remote Object Storage. As with most innovative technologies, if you dig a little deeper… different use cases start to present themselves and unintended use cases find their way to the surface.

Such was the case when, together with AWS and VMware, we looked at how Cloud Tier could be used as a way to allow on demand recovery into a cloud platform like VMware Cloud on AWS. By way of a quick overview, the solution shown below has Veeam backing up to a Scale Out Backup Repository which has a Capacity Tier backed by an Object Storage repository in Amazon S3. There is a minimal operational restore window set which means data is offloaded quicker to the Capacity Tier.

Once there, if disaster happens on premises, an SDDC is spun up, a Backup & Replication Server deployed and configured into that SDDC. From there, a SOBR is configured with the same Amazon S3 credentials that connects to the Object Storage bucket which detects the backup data and starts a resync of the metadata back to the local performance tier. (as described here) Once the resync has finished workloads can be recovered, streamed directly from the Capacity Tier.

The diagram above has been published on the AWS Reference Architecture page, and while this post has been brief, there is more to come by way of an offical AWS Blog Post co-authored by myself Frank Fan from AWS around this solution. We will also look to automate the process as much as possible to make this a truely on demand solution that can be actioned with the click of a button.

For now, the concept has been validated and the hope is people looking to leverage VMware Cloud on AWS as a target for disaster and recovery look to leverage Veeam and the Cloud Tier to make that happen.

References: AWS Reference Architecture

Cloud Tier Deep Dive Super Session On Demand!

Last week at VeeamON 2019, Dustin Albertson and myself delivered a two part deep dive session on Cloud Tier, which was released in Update 4 of Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 in January. I’ve blogged about how Cloud Tier is one of the most innovative features i’ve seen in recent times and I have been able to dig under the covers of the technology from early in the development cycle. I have presented basic overviews to more complex deep dives over the past six or so months however at VeeamON 2019, Dustin and myself took it a step further and went even deeper.

Part I:

The first part of the Deep Dive was presented as the first session of the event, just after the opening keynote. It was on main stage and was all slide driven content that introduces the Cloud Tier, talks about the architecture and then dives deeper into its inner workings as well as us talking about some of the caveats.

Part II:

From the first session to the last session slot of the event…to finish up, Dustin and I presented a demo only super session which I have to admit… was one of the best sessions i’ve ever been a part of in terms of flow, audience participation and what we where able to actually show. We even where able to show off some of the new COPY functionality coming in v10.

There are a few scripts that we used in that session that I will look to release on GitHub over the next week or so.. so stay tuned for those! But for now, enjoy the session recordings embedded above.

Cloud Tier Data Migration between AWS and Azure… or anywhere in between!

At the recent Cloud Field Day 5 (CFD#5) I presented a deep dive on the Veeam Cloud Tier which was released as a feature extension of our Scale Out Backup Repository (SOBR) in Update 4 of Veeam Backup & Replication. Since we went GA we have been able to track the success of this feature by looking at Public Cloud Object Storage consumption by Veeam customers using the feature. As of last week Veeam customers have been offloading petabytes of backup data into Azure Blob and Amazon S3…not counting the data being offloaded to other Object Storage repositories.

During the Cloud Field Day 5 presentation, Michael Cade talked about the Portability of Veeam’s data format, around how we do not lock our customers into any specific hardware or format that requires a specific underlying File System. We offer complete Flexibility and Agnosticity where your data is stored and the same is true when talking about what Object Storage platform to choose for the offloading of data with the Cloud Tier.

I had a need recently to setup a Capacity Tier extent that was backed by an Object Storage Repository on Azure Blob. I wanted to use the same backup data that I had in an existing Amazon S3 backed Capacity Tier while still keeping things clean in my Backup & Replication console…luckily we have built in a way to migrate to a new Object Storage Repository, taking advantage of the innovative tech we have built into the Cloud Tier.

Cloud Tier Data Migration:

During the offload process data is tiered from the Performance Tier to the Capacity Tier effectively Dehydrating the VBK files of all backup data only leaving the metadata with an Index that points to where the data blocks have been offloaded into the Object Storage.

This process can also be reversed and the VBK file can be rehydrated. The ability to bring the data back from Capacity Tier to the Performance Tier means that if there was ever a requirement to evacuate or migrate away from a particular Object Storage Provider, the ability to do so is built into Backup & Replication.

In this small example, as you can see below, the SOBR was configured with a Capacity Tier backed by Amazon S3 and using about 15GB of Object Storage.

The first step is to download the data back from the Object Storage and rehydrate the VBK files on the Performance Tier extents.

There are two ways to achieve the rehydration or download operation.

  1. Via the Backup & Replication Console
  2. Via a PowerShell Cmdlet
Rehydration via the Console:

From the Home Menu under Backups right click on the Job Name and select Backup Properties. From here there is a list of the Files contained within the job and also the objects that they contain. Depending on where the data is stored (remembering that the data blocks are only even in one location… the Performance Tier or the Capacity Tier) the icon against the File name will be slightly different with files offloaded represented with a Cloud.

Right Clicking on any of these files will give you the option to Copy the data back to the Performance Tier. You have the choice to copy back the backup file or the backup files and all its dependancies.

Once this is selected, a SOBR Download job is kicked off and the data is moved back to the Performance Tier. It’s important to note that our Intelligent Block Recovery will come into play here and look at the local data blocks to see if any match what is trying to be downloaded from the Object Storage… if so it will copy them from the Performance Tier, saving on egress charges and also speeding up the process.

In the image above you can see the Download Job working and only downloaded 95.5MB from Object Storage with 15.1GB copied from the Performance Tier… meaning the data blocks for the most that are local are able to be used for the rehydration.

The one caveat to this method is that you can’t select bulk files or multiple backup jobs so the process to rehydrate everything from the Capacity Tier can be tedious.

Rehydration via PowerShell:

To solve that problem we can use PowerShell to call the Start-VBRDownloadBackupFile cmdlet to do the bulk of the work for us. Below are the steps I used to get the backup job details, feed that through to variable that contains all the file names, and then kick off the Download Job.

The PowerShell window will then show the Download Job running

Completing the Migration:

No matter which way the Download job is initiated, we can see the progress form the Backup & Replication Console under the Jobs section.

And looking at the Disk and Network sections of Windows Resource Monitor we can see connections to Amazon S3 pulling the required blocks of data down.

Once the Download job has been completed and all VBKs have been rehydrated, the next step is to change the configuration of the SOBR Capacity Tier to point at the Object Storage Repository backed by Azure Blob.

The final step is to initiate an offload to the new Capacity Tier via an Offload Job…this can be triggered via the console or via Powershell (as shown in the last command of the PowerShell code above) and because we have already a set of data that satisfies the conditions for offload (sealed chains and backups outside the operational restore window) data will be dehydrated once again…but this time up to Azure Blob.

The used space shown below in the Azure Blob Object Storage matches the used space initially in Amazon S3 All recovery operations show Restore Points on the Performance Tier and on the Capacity Tier as dictated by the operational restore window policy.
Conclusion:

As mentioned in the intro, the ability for Veeam customers to have control of their data is an important principal revolving around data portability. With the Cloud Tier we have extended that by allowing you to choose the Object Storage Repository of your choice for cloud based storage or Veeam backup data…but also given you the option to pull that data out and shift when and where desired. Migrating data between AWS, Azure or any platform is easily achieved and can be done without too much hassle.

References:

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/powershell/object_storage_data_transfer.html?ver=95u4

Disaster Recovery and Resiliency with Veeam Cloud Tier

Yesterday at Cloud Field Day 5, I presented a deep dive on our Cloud Tier feature that was released as a feature for Scale Out Backup Repository (SOBR) in Veeam Backup & Replication Update 4. The section went through an overview of its value proposition as well as deep dive into how we are tiering the backup data into Object Storage repositories via the Capacity Tier Extend of a SOBR. I also covered the space saving and cost saving efficiencies we have built into the feature as well as looking at the full suite of recoverability options still available with data sitting in an Object Storage Repository.

This included a live demo of a situation where a local Backup infrastructure had been lost and what the steps would be to leverage the Cloud Tier to bring that data back at a recovery site.

Quick Overview of Offload Job and VBK Dehydration:

Once a Capacity Tier Extent has been configured, the SOBR Offload Job is enabled. This job is responsible for validating what data is marked to move from the Performance Tier to the Capacity Tier based on two conditions.

  1. The Policy defining the Operational Restore Window
  2. If the backup data is part os a sealed backup chain

The first condition is all about setting a policy on how many days you want to keep data locally on the SOBR Performance Tiers which effectively become your landing zone. This is often dictated by customer requirements and now can be used to better design a more efficient approach to local storage with the understanding that the majority of older data will be tiered to Object storage.

The second is around the sealing of backup chains which means they are no longer under transformation. This is explained in this Veeam Help Document and I also go through it in the CFD#5 session video here.

Once those conditions are met, the job starts to dehydrate the local backup files and offload the data into Object Storage leaving a dehydrated shell with only the metadata.

The importance of this process is that because we leave the shell locally with all the metadata contained, we are able to still perform every Veeam Recovery option including Instant VM Recovery and Restore to Azure or AWS.

Resiliency and Disaster Recovery with Cloud Tier:

Looking at the above image of the offload process you can see that the metadata is replicated to the Object Storage as well as the Archive Index which keeps track of which blocks are mapped to what backup file. In fact for every extent we keep a resilient copy of the archive index meaning that if an extent is lost, there is still a reference.

Why this is relevant is because it gives us disaster recovery options in the case of a loss of whole a whole backup site or the loss of an extent. During the synchronization, we download the backup files with metadata located in the object storage repository to the extents and rebuild the data locally before making it available in the backup console.

After the synchronization is complete, all the backups located in object storage will become available as imported  jobs and will be displayed under the Backups and Imported in the inventory pane. But what better way to see this in action than a live demo…Below, I have pasted in the Cloud Field Day video that will start at the point that I show the demo. If the auto-start doesn’t kick in correctly the demo starts at the 31:30 minute mark.

References:

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/vsphere/capacity_tier_offload_job.html?ver=95u4

Update 4 for Service Providers – Extending Backup Repositories to Object Storage with Cloud Tier

When Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4 went Generally Available in late January I posted a What’s in it for Service Providers blog. In that post I briefly outlined all the new features and enhancements in Update 4 as it related to our Veeam Cloud and Service Providers. As mentioned each new major feature deserves it’s own seperate post. I’ve covered off the majority of the new feature so far, and today i’m covering what I believe is Veeam’s most innovative feature that has been released of late… The Cloud Tier.

As a reminder here are the top new features and enhancements in Update 4 for VCSPs.

Cloud Tier:

When I was in charge of the architecture and design of Service Provider backup platforms, without question the hardest and most challenging aspect of designing the backend storage was how to facilitate storage consumption and growth. The thirst to backup workloads into the cloud continues to grow and with it comes the growth of that data and the desire to store it for longer. Even yesterday I was talking to a large Veeam Cloud & Service Provider who was experiencing similar challenges with managing their Cloud Connect and IaaS backup repositories.

Cloud Tier in Update 4 fundamentally changes the way in which the initial landing zone for backups is designed. With the ability to offload backup data to cheaper storage the Cloud Tier, which is part of the Scale-Out Backup Repository allows for a more streamlined and efficient Performance Tier of backup repository while leveraging scalable Object Storage for the Capacity Tier.

How it Works:

The innovative technology we have built into this feature allows for data to be stripped out of Veeam backup files (which are part of a sealed chain) and offloaded as blocks of data to Object Storage leaving a dehydrated Veeam backup file on the local extents with just the metadata remaining in place. This is done based on a policy that is set against the Scale-out Backup Repository that dictates the operational restore window of which local storage is used as the primary landing zone for backup data and processed as a Tiering Job every four hours. The result is a space saving, smaller footprint on the local storage without sacrificing any of Veeam’s industry-leading recovery operations. This is what truly sets this feature apart and means that even with data residing in the Capacity Tier, you can still perform:

  • Instant VM Recoveries
  • Entire computer and disk-level restores
  • File-level and item-level restores
  • Direct Restore to Amazon EC2, Azure and Azure Stack
What this Means for VCSPs:

Put simply it means that for providers who want to offload backup data to cheaper storage while maintaining a high performance landing zone for more recent backup data to live  the Cloud Tier is highly recommended. If there are existing space issues on the local SOBR repositories, implementing Cloud Tier will relieve pressure and in reality allow VCSPs to not have to seek further hardware purchase to expand the storage platforms backing those repositories.

When it comes to Cloud Connect Backup, the fact that Backup Copy Jobs are statistically the most used form of offsite backup sent to VCSPs the potential for savings is significant. Self contained GFS backup files are prime candidates for the Cloud Tier offload and given that they are generally kept for extended periods of time, means that it also represents a large percentage of data stored on repositories.

Having a look below you can see an example of a Cloud Connect Backup Copy job from the VCSP side when browsing from Explorer.

You can see the GFS files are all about 22MB in size. This is because they are dehydrated VBKs with only metatdata remaining locally. Those files where originally about 10GB before the offload job was run against them.

Wrap Up:

With the small example shown above, VCSPs should be starting to understand the potential impact Cloud Tier can have on the way they design and manage their backup repositories. The the ability to leverage Amazon S3, Azure Blog and any S3 Compatible Object Storage Platform means that VCSPs have the choice in regards to what storage they use for the Capacity Tier. If you are a VCSP and haven’t looked at how Cloud Tier can work for your service offering…what are you waiting for?

Glossary:

Object Storage Repository -> Name given to repository that is backed by Amazon S3, S3, Azure Blob or IBM Cloud

Capacity Tier -> Name given to extent on a SOBR using an Object Storage Repository

Cloud Tier -> Marketing name given to feature in Update 4

Resources:

Harness the power of cloud storage for long-term retention with Veeam Cloud Tier

Quick Look: Cloud Tier SOBR Offload Job

With the release of Update 4 for Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 we introduced the Cloud Tier, which is an extension of the Scale Out Backup Repository (SOBR). The Cloud Tier allows for data to be stripped out of Veeam backup files and offloaded as blocks of data to Object Storage leaving a dehydrated Veeam backup file on the local extents with just the metadata remaining in place. This is done based on a policy that is set against the SOBR that dictates the operational restore window of which local storage is used as the primary landing zone for backup data. The result is a space saving, smaller footprint on the local storage.

Overview of Offload Job:

By default the offload job is run against the data located on the Performance Tier extents of the SOBR every 4 hours. This is a set value that can not be changed. To offload the backup data to the Capacity Tier, the Offload job does the following:

  • Verifies whether backup chains located on the Performance Tier extents satisfy validation criteria and can be offloaded to object storage.
  • Collects verified backup chains from each Performance Tier extent and sends them directly to object storage in the form of data blocks.
  • Saves each session results to the configuration database so that you can review them upon request.

The job and job details can be viewed from the History Menu under System or the Home Menu under Last 24 Hours.

The details of the job will show how much data was offloaded to the Capacity Tier per VM residing on the SOBR. It will show statistics on how much data was processed, read and transferred. Once this job has completed, the local backup files only contain job metadata with the data residing on the Object Storage.

Forcing The Offload Job:

As mentioned, the Offload Job by default is set to run every 4 hours from the creation initial configuration of the Capacity Tier extent on the SOBR. The default value of 4 hours can not be modified however if you want to force the job to run you have two options.

First option is through the UI, under the Backup Infrastructure Menu and under Scale-Out Repositories, do a CONTROL+Click against the SOBR and select the Run Tiering Job Now option. This is hidden by default as an option and will only be shown with the CONTROL+Click

Second option is to run the following PowerShell command:

This tiggers the Offload Job to run.

Note that once the Offload Job has been forced the 4 hours counter is reset to when the job was run…ie the next job will be 4 hours from the time the job was forced.

It’s important to understand that running the job on demand doesn’t necessary mean that you will offload data to the Capacity Tier any quicker. The conditions around operations restore window and sealed backup chains still need to be in place for the job to do its thing. Having the job run six times a day (every 4 hours) is generally going to be more than enough for most instances.

If no data has been offloaded, you will see the following in the job details:

Wrap Up and More Cloud Tier:

To learn more about the Cloud Tier head to my veeam.com post here, and also check our Rhys Hammonds post here. Also look out for a new Veeam White Paper being released in the next month or so which will deep dive into the Cloud Tier in more detail. I will post a few more posts on the Cloud Tier over the next few weeks as well looking at some more use cases and features.

References:

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/vsphere/capacity_tier.html?ver=95u4

 

 

Cloud Field Day 5 – Recap and Videos #CFD5

Last week I had the pleasure of presenting at Cloud Field Day 5 (a Tech Field Day event). Joined by Michael Cade and David Hill, we took the delegates through Veeam’s cloud vision by showcasing current product and features in the Veeam platform including specific technology that both leverages and protects Public Cloud workloads and services. We also touched on where Veeam is at in terms of market success and also dug into how Veeam enables Service Providers to build services off our Cloud Connect technology.

First off, I would like to thank Stephen Foskett and the guys at Gestalt IT for putting together the event. Believe me there is a lot that goes on behind the scenes and it is impressive how the team are able to setup, tear down and setup agin in different venues while handling the delegates themselves. Also to all the delegates, it was extremely valuable being able to not only present to the group, but also have a chance to talk shop at the offical reception dinner…some great thought provoking conversations where had and I look forward to seeing where your IT journey takes you all next!

Getting back to the recap, i’ve pasted in the YouTube links to the Veeam session below. Michael Cade has a great recap here, where he gives his overview on what was presented and some thoughts about the event.

In terms of what was covered:

We tried to focus on core features relating to cloud and then show a relatable live demo to reinforce the slide decks. No smoke and mirrors when the Veeam Product Strategy Team is doing demos… they are always live!

For those that might not have been up to speed with what Veeam has done over the past couple of years it is a great opportunity to learn about what we have done innovating the Data Protection space, while also looking at the progress we have made in recent times in transitioning to a true software defined, hardware agnostic platform that offers customers absolute choice. We like to say that Veeam was born in the virtual world…but is evolving in the Cloud!

Summary:

Once again, being part of Cloud Field Day 5 was a fantastic experience, and the team executed the event well. In terms of what Veeam set out to achieve, Michael, David and myself where happy with what we where able to present and demo and we where happy with the level of questions being asked by the delegates. We are looking forward to attending Tech Field Day 20 later in the year and maybe as well as continue to show what Veeam can do today…take a look at where we are going in future releases!

References:

Cloud Field Day 5

Update 4 for Service Providers – Targeting vCloud Director with Cloud Connect Replication

When Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4 went Generally Available in late January I posted a What’s in it for Service Providers blog. In that post I briefly outlined all the new features and enhancements in Update 4 as it related to our Veeam Cloud and Service Providers. As mentioned each new major feature deserves it’s own seperate post. I’ve covered off the majority of the new feature so far, and for the final post in the series I am looking at something that is close to my heart…vCloud Director Support for Veeam Cloud Connect Replication.

As a reminder here are the top new features and enhancements in Update 4 for VCSPs.

Leveraging the Best of vCloud Director for Stronger DRaaS:

VMware vCloud Director is the de facto standard for service providers who offer Infrastructure as a Service based on VMware and Veeam has had a long history supporting vCloud Director, with the industry’s first support for vCloud Director aware backups released in Veeam Backup & Replication v7 following on with the first stand alone Self Service Backup Portal in v9.5.

With the release of Update 4, we have added support for Veeam Cloud Connect to replicate directly into vCloud Director virtual datacenters, allowing both our Cloud and Service Provider Partners (VCSP) and customers to take advantage of the enhancements VMware has built into the platform. While this has been a long time coming, this support represents a significant enhancement to the way in which our VCSPs offer DRaaS.

With tenants consuming vCloud Director resources, it allows them to take advantage of more powerful features when dealing with full disaster, or the failure of individual workloads. Full and partial failovers will be more transparent with the use of the vCloud Director HTML5 Tenant UI and the vCloud Director HTML5 UI will also allow tenants to see what is happening to workloads as they boot and interact with the guest OS directly. This takes the pressure of the VCSPs helpdesk and gives tenants more control of their replicas once failed over.

Enhanced Edge Networking with NSX:

From a networking point of view, being able to access the NSX Edge Gateway for replicated workloads means that tenants can leverage the advanced networking features available on the NSX Edge Gateway. The Network Extension Appliance did a great job in offering basic network functionality however the NSX Edge offers:

  • Advanced Firewalling and NAT
  • Advanced Dynamic Routing (BGP, OSPF and more)
  • Advanced Load Balancing
  • IPsec and L2VPN
  • SSL VPN
  • SSL Certificate Services

Once a failover has been triggered from the Veeam Backup & Replication Console or via the VCSPs own Portals, the ability to manage and configure everything through the vCloud Director HTML5 UI utilizing NSX via vCloud Director enhances Cloud Connect Replication for both service providers and tenants.

Network Automation During Partial Failovers with the NEA:

There are a number of options that can be used to extend the tenant network to the service provider cloud network when actioning a partial failover. Tenants and service providers can configure:

  • Custom IPsec VPN
  • IPsec or L2VPN via the NSX Edge Gateway
  • NEA to NEA L2 VPN

The Network Extension Appliance is still available for deployment in the same way as before Update 4 and can be used directly from within a vCloud Director virtual datacenter. The NEA’s automate the extension of a tenant network so that the failed over workload can be accessible from the tenant network, even though it resides in the service provider’s environment. The NEA to NEA option is the simplest and most effective way to extend the tenants network to the cloud network.

NOTE: I will be dedicating a seperate blog post to this feature as I believe this is one of the leading innovative features we have as part of Cloud Connect Replication.

vCloud Director 9.7 Compatibility:

Just a quick note to finish that at the time of writing this post, Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update4a does not officially support vCloud Director 9.7. We currently support up to vCloud Director 9.5 but will be looking to add supportability for 9.7 within the next 90 days.

Wrap Up:

DRaaS is something that is only just becoming recognized as something that organizations require as part of their overall data protection strategy. Veeam has had a strong offering delivered through our VCSPs for a while now, with a strong focus on network automation which is typically the hardest part of any DRaaS offering. With Cloud Connect Replication now targeting vCloud Director we now have a very compelling DRaaS product that is simple, flexible and reliable…yet still delivers enterprise grade functionality.

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