Author Archives: Anthony Spiteri

VCSP Important Notice: 9.5 Update 4a Is Out with Fixes and Platform Supportability

Yesterday Update 4a for Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 (Build 9.5.4.2753) was made available for download to all Veeam customers and partners. This build updates the GA code and is a cumulative hotfixes rollup that resolves a number of issues from the initial release. There is also enhanced platform support, most significantly initial readiness for VMware vSphere 6.7 Update 2 and Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2019 support.

For Veeam Cloud and Service Provider Partners, Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4a includes specific bug fixes. These fixes help those who offer Veeam Cloud Connect services, and also those that offer managed backup services with Veeam Availability Console. There is a Veeam Forum thread that has been updated with all the specific fixes. For the full change log, head to this thread on the Veeam Cloud & Service Provider (VCSP) forum.

It’s important to note for VCSPs that this is not a breaking update, meaning your tenants will not have any issues performing Cloud Connect Backup or Replication jobs if they are on Update4a before you. It’s still recommended that you look to upgrade as soon as possible as change windows would permit.

Update Notes:

If you are upgrading directly to from 9.0 or earlier you need to source the full ISO image from the download section.

References:

https://www.veeam.com/kb2926

Top vBlog 2018: Thoughts, Notable Representation and Thanks

Last week the Top vBlog for 2018 where announced based on votes cast late last year on content delivered in 2017. Similar to last year Eric Siebert continued the new voting mechanisms that delivers a more palatable outcome for all who where involved. The mix of public votes and points based on number of posts and Google Page speed works well and delivers interesting results for all those active bloggers listed on the vLaunchpad.

The one thing I wanted to highlight before taking a look at the results was to talk about the ongoing importance of this vote in the face of some strong backlash over recent years it. It was pleasing to see a number of new entrants and those that made significant jumps go on social media and talk about how humbled and excited they where to make the list. This is an important reminder to those that might be feeling a little over it and cynical of the process to understand that there are always up and comers who deserve a shot at being in the spotlight. It still means a lot to those people…so don’t spoil it for them!

The Results:

As expected, the top two spots remained the same as last year with William Lam taking out the #1 spot with Vladan Seget, Cormac Hogan, Scott Lowe and Eric Siebert himself rounding out the top 5. There was lots of movement in the top 25 and I managed to climb up into #15 spot which is again…extremely humbling and I think those that voted for me again this year.

Aussie Representation:

As with previous years I like to highlight the Aussie and Kiwi (ANZ) representation in the Top vBlog and this year is no different. We have a great blogging scene here in the VMware community and that is reflected with the quality of the bloggers listed below. Special mention to Rhys Hammond who debuted at #146 and to Jon Waite who does amazing technical deep dive posts around vCloud Director and debuted at 205.

Blog Rank Previous Change Total Points Total Votes Posts 2017
VCDX133 (Rene Van Den Bedem) 10 11 1 2596 323 48
Virtualization is Life! (Anthony Spiteri) 15 19 4 2173 251 88
Long White Virtual Clouds (Webster) 36 20 -16 1151 169 12
CloudXC (Josh Odgers) 48 29 -19 1037 167 22
Penguinpunk.net (Dan Frith) 102 106 4 744 63 114
Rhys Hammond 146 N/A N/A 546 50 21
Virtual Tassie (Matt Allford) 150 190 40 529 41 25
Kiwicloud.ninja (Jon Waite) 205 N/A N/A 413 49 12
ukotic.net (Mark Ukotic) 217 201 -16 393 29 15
Ready Set Virtual (Keiran Shelden) 254 N/A N/A 285 31 16
Veeam Representation:

My follow colleagues at Veeam made it into the list with four of us in the top 20 which is a great effort and four of the Product Strategy team are included in the top votes. Special should out to Melissa Palmer who cracked the top 10! We have a strong community feel at Veeam and it’s reflected in the quality of the blogging we generate…There was also a sizeable representation from our Veeam Vanguard’s as well.

Blog Rank Previous Change Total Points Total Votes Posts 2017
vMiss (Melissa Palmer) 6 16 10 2635 326 49
Virtualization is Life! (Anthony Spiteri) 15 19 4 2173 251 88
Jorge de la Cruz Mingo 16 30 14 1635 159 184
Notes from MWhite (Michael White) 17 31 14 1618 193 115
vZilla (Michael Cade) 29 44 15 1189 138 41
Domalab (Michele Domanico) 33 N/A N/A 1159 98 78
Virtual To The Core (Luca Dell’Oca) 45 38 -7 1045 138 32
Tim’s Tech Thoughts (Tim Smith) 110 48 -62 704 78 17
David Hill 127 107 -20 632 72 15
The Results Show:

Again a massive thank you to Eric for putting together the voting and organising the whole thing. It’s a huge undertaking and we should all be in gratitude to Eric for making it all happen.

Creating content for this community is a pleasure and has become somewhat of a personal obsession so it’s nice to get some recognition and I’m happy that what I’m able to produce is (for the most) found useful by people in the community. I’m a passionate guy in most things that I am involved in so it’s no surprise that I feel so strongly in being able to contribute to this great vCommunity…especially when it comes to my strong passion around Hosting, Cloud, Backup and DR.

The whole list and category winners can been viewed here.

Quick Post – vCloud Director 9.5.0.2 Released

While we wait for the upcoming release of vCloud Director 9.7 next month (after the covers where torn off the next release in a blog post last week by the vCloud Team), VMware have released a new build (9.5.0.2 Build 12810511) of vCloud Director 9.5 that contains a number of resolved issues and is a recommended patch update.

Looking through the resolved issues it seems like the majority of fixes are around networking and to do with NSX Edge Gateway deployments as well as a few fixes around OVF template importing and API interactions.

While looking through the new layout of the VMware Docs page for vCloud Director I noticed that a few new builds for 9.1, 9.0 and 8.20 had shipped out over the past few months or so. I updated the vCloud Director Release History to reflect all the latest builds across all versions.

References:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/vCloud-Director/9.5/rn/vCloud-Director-9502-for-Service-Providers-Release-Notes.html

https://blogs.vmware.com/vcloud/2019/03/the-hybrid-cloud-gets-better-meet-vcloud-director-9-7.html

 

Update 4 for Service Providers – Extending Backup Repositories to Object Storage with Cloud Tier

When Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4 went Generally Available in late January I posted a What’s in it for Service Providers blog. In that post I briefly outlined all the new features and enhancements in Update 4 as it related to our Veeam Cloud and Service Providers. As mentioned each new major feature deserves it’s own seperate post. I’ve covered off the majority of the new feature so far, and today i’m covering what I believe is Veeam’s most innovative feature that has been released of late… The Cloud Tier.

As a reminder here are the top new features and enhancements in Update 4 for VCSPs.

Cloud Tier:

When I was in charge of the architecture and design of Service Provider backup platforms, without question the hardest and most challenging aspect of designing the backend storage was how to facilitate storage consumption and growth. The thirst to backup workloads into the cloud continues to grow and with it comes the growth of that data and the desire to store it for longer. Even yesterday I was talking to a large Veeam Cloud & Service Provider who was experiencing similar challenges with managing their Cloud Connect and IaaS backup repositories.

Cloud Tier in Update 4 fundamentally changes the way in which the initial landing zone for backups is designed. With the ability to offload backup data to cheaper storage the Cloud Tier, which is part of the Scale-Out Backup Repository allows for a more streamlined and efficient Performance Tier of backup repository while leveraging scalable Object Storage for the Capacity Tier.

How it Works:

The innovative technology we have built into this feature allows for data to be stripped out of Veeam backup files (which are part of a sealed chain) and offloaded as blocks of data to Object Storage leaving a dehydrated Veeam backup file on the local extents with just the metadata remaining in place. This is done based on a policy that is set against the Scale-out Backup Repository that dictates the operational restore window of which local storage is used as the primary landing zone for backup data and processed as a Tiering Job every four hours. The result is a space saving, smaller footprint on the local storage without sacrificing any of Veeam’s industry-leading recovery operations. This is what truly sets this feature apart and means that even with data residing in the Capacity Tier, you can still perform:

  • Instant VM Recoveries
  • Entire computer and disk-level restores
  • File-level and item-level restores
  • Direct Restore to Amazon EC2, Azure and Azure Stack
What this Means for VCSPs:

Put simply it means that for providers who want to offload backup data to cheaper storage while maintaining a high performance landing zone for more recent backup data to live  the Cloud Tier is highly recommended. If there are existing space issues on the local SOBR repositories, implementing Cloud Tier will relieve pressure and in reality allow VCSPs to not have to seek further hardware purchase to expand the storage platforms backing those repositories.

When it comes to Cloud Connect Backup, the fact that Backup Copy Jobs are statistically the most used form of offsite backup sent to VCSPs the potential for savings is significant. Self contained GFS backup files are prime candidates for the Cloud Tier offload and given that they are generally kept for extended periods of time, means that it also represents a large percentage of data stored on repositories.

Having a look below you can see an example of a Cloud Connect Backup Copy job from the VCSP side when browsing from Explorer.

You can see the GFS files are all about 22MB in size. This is because they are dehydrated VBKs with only metatdata remaining locally. Those files where originally about 10GB before the offload job was run against them.

Wrap Up:

With the small example shown above, VCSPs should be starting to understand the potential impact Cloud Tier can have on the way they design and manage their backup repositories. The the ability to leverage Amazon S3, Azure Blog and any S3 Compatible Object Storage Platform means that VCSPs have the choice in regards to what storage they use for the Capacity Tier. If you are a VCSP and haven’t looked at how Cloud Tier can work for your service offering…what are you waiting for?

Glossary:

Object Storage Repository -> Name given to repository that is backed by Amazon S3, S3, Azure Blob or IBM Cloud

Capacity Tier -> Name given to extent on a SOBR using an Object Storage Repository

Cloud Tier -> Marketing name given to feature in Update 4

Resources:

Harness the power of cloud storage for long-term retention with Veeam Cloud Tier

First Look – Runecast Adding Support for VMware HCL

Two years ago at the 2017 Sydney and Melbourne UserCons, I spent time with a couple of the founders of Runecast, Stanimir Markov and Ched Smokovic and got to know a little more about their real time analytics platform for VMware based infrastructure. Fast forward to today and Runecast have continued to build on the their initial release and have continued to add features and enhancements. The most recent of those, which is the ability to report on a ESXi Hosts VMware Hardware Compatibility List (HCL) is currently in beta and will be released shortly.

Currently, Runecast checks hardware versions, drivers and firmware against existing VMware KB articles and provides proactive findings for known issues that could impact your servers. With this addition Runecast will now show the compliance status of hardware against the VMware HCL.

This feature alone literally replaces hours of work to extract the needed data and match each server from your environment against the HCL. Critically, it can inform you if, where, and why your vSphere environment is not supported by VMware because of Hardware Compatibility issues.

In terms of what it looks like, as from the screen shot above you can see the new menu item that give you the Compatibly Overview. Your hosts are listed in the main window pane and are shows as green or red depending on their status against the HCL.

Clicking on the details you are shows the details of the host against the HCL data. If the host is out of whack with the HCL you will get an explanation similar to what is seen below. (note in the BETA I have installed this was not

With this feature you can identify which component is incompatible and unsupported. From there it will also indicate what the supportability options are for you.

Runecast keep adding great features to their platform… and most of their features are ones which any vSphere admin would find very helpful. That is the essence of what they are trying achieve.

For more information and to apply for the beta head here:

References:

https://www.runecast.com/blog/announcements/runecast-analyzer-support-for-vmware-hcl-beta

 

VMUG UserCon – Sydney and Melbourne Events!

A few years ago I claimed that the Melbourne VMUG Usercon was the “Best Virtualisation Event Outside of VMworld!” …that was a big statement if ever there was one however, over the past couple of years I still feel like that statement holds court even though there are much bigger UserCons around the world. In fairness, both Sydney and Melbourne UserCons are solid events and even with VMUG numbers generally struggling world wide, the events are still well attended and a must for anyone working around the VMware ecosystem.

Both events happen a couple of days apart from each other on the 19th and 21st of March and both are filled with quality content, quality presenters and a great community feel.

This will be my sixth straight Melbourne UserCon and my fourth Sydney UserCon…The last couple of years I have attended with Veeam and presented a couple of times. This year Veeam has UserCon Global Sponsorship which is exciting as the Global Product Strategy team will be presenting a lot of the UserCons around the world. Both the Sydney and Melbourne Agenda’s are jam packed with virtualisation and automation goodness and it’s actually hard to attend everything of interest with schedule conflicts happening throughout the day.

…the agenda’s are listed on the sites.

As mentioned, Veeam is sponsoring both events a the Global Elite level and I’ll be presenting a session on Automation and Orchestration of Veeam and VMware featuring VMware Cloud on AWS which is an updated followup to the VMworld Session I presented last year. The Veeam SDDC Deployment Toolkit has been evolving since then and i’ll talk about what it means to leverage APIs and PowerShell to achieve automation goodness with a live demo!

Other notable sessions include:

If you are in Sydney or Melbourne next week try and get down to Sydney ICC and The Crown Casino respectively to participate, learn and contribute and hopefully we can catch up for a drink.

Update 4 for Service Providers – Cloud Mobility and External Repository for N2WS

When Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4 went Generally Available a couple of weeks ago I posted a What’s in it for Service Providers blog. In that post I briefly outlined all the new features and enhancements in Update 4 as it related to our Veeam Cloud and Service Providers. As mentioned each new major feature deserves it’s own seperate post. I’ve covered off three feature so far, and today i’m going to talk about two features that are more aligned to Managed Service Providers, but still could have a place in the pure IaaS world.

As a reminder here are the top new features and enhancements in Update 4 for VCSPs.

Cloud Mobility:

The Cloud Mobility feature is actually the new umbrella name for our Restore to functionality. Prior to Update 4 we had the ability to Restore to Microsoft Azure only. With the release of Update 4 we have added the ability to Restore to Microsoft Azure Stack and Amazon EC2. It’s important to point out what Cloud Mobility isn’t…that is a disaster recovery feature set. in that you can’t rely on this feature in the same way that Cloud Connect Replication allows you to power on VM replicas on demand for DR.

Though you could configure restore tasks to run on demand via PowerShell commands and have systems in a ready state after recovery it is difficult to attach an RPTO to the recovery process and therefore Cloud Mobility should be used for migrations and testing. In essence this is why it is called Cloud Mobility…to give users and Service Providers the flexibility to shift workloads from one platform to another with ease.

Restore to EC2:

The ability to restore direct to EC2 is something that is demanded these days and the addition of this feature to Update 4 was one of the most highly anticipated. In enabling the restoration of workloads into EC2 we have enabled our customers and partners to have the option to backup workloads from the following:

These backups, once stored in the Veeam Backup File format, ensures absolute portability of those workloads. In terms of restoring to EC2, the process is straight forward and can be done via the Backup & Replication console or via PowerShell.

Again, the focus of this feature is to enable migrations and testing. However when put together with the External Repository, we also complete a loopback by way of having a way to restore EC2 instances that where initially backed up with N2WS Backup & Recovery and archived to an Amazon S3 Bucket.

It should also be noted that to perform a recovery, only the most recent restore point can be used.

External Repository:

The External Repository allows you to add an Amazon S3 bucket that contain backups created by N2WS Backup & Recovery for AWS environments. Backup & Recovery for AWS will create backups of Elastic Block Stores disk volumes of EC2 instances. As part of the 2.4 release these backups where able to be placed directly to Amazon S3 object storage repositories. This is what is added to the Veeam Backup & Replication console as an External Repositories.

Backup & Recovery for AWS uses the Veeam Backup API to preserve the backup structure in the native Veeam format which are housed in the Amazon S3 Bucket as oVBKs. The External Repository cannot be used as a target for backup or backup copy jobs. Once the External Repository is configured, N2WS VMs can be manipulated through the Backup & Replication Console as per usual. This allows all the restore capabilities including Restore to EC2 and also more importantly the ability to perform Backup Copy Jobs against the backed up data to enable even longer term retention outside of Amazon S3.

Wrap Up:

The addition of Restore to EC2, Azure Stack and the External Repository can be used by manager service providers and service providers to offer true Cloud Mobility to their customers. Also, while a lot of organization are moving to the Public Cloud…this is not a fait accompli and they do sometimes want to get workloads out of those platforms and back on-premises or to Service Provider Clouds.. It shouldn’t be a Hotel California situation and with these new Update 4 features Veeam customers have more choice than other.

References:

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/vsphere/restore_amazon.html?ver=95u4

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/vsphere/external_repository.html?ver=95u4

Automatic restore of multiple machines from Veeam to AWS

 

Quick Look – New Cloud Credentials Manager in Update 4

With the release of Update 4 for Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 we further enhanced our overall cloud capabilities by adding a number of new features and enhancements that focus on tenants being able to leverage Veeam Cloud and Service Providers as well as Public Cloud services. With the addition of Cloud Mobility, External Repository and Cloud Connect Replication supporting vCloud Director we decided to break out the existing credential manager and create a new manager dedicated to the configuration and management of Cloud specific credentials.

The manager can be accessed by clicking on the top left dropdown menu from the Backup & Replication Console and then choosing Manage Cloud Credentials.

You can use the Cloud Credentials Manager to create and manage all credentials that are planned to use to connect to cloud services.

The following types of credentials can be configured and managed:

  • Veeam Cloud Connect (Backup and Replication for both Hardware Plans and vCD)
  • Amazon AWS (Storage and Compute)
  • Microsoft Azure Storage (Azure Blob)
  • Microsoft Azure Compute (Azure and Azure Stack)

The Cloud Connect credentials are straight forward in terms of what they are used for. There is even a way for non vCloud Director Authenticated tenants to change their own default passwords directly.

When it comes to AWS and Azure credentials the manager will allow you to configure accounts that can be used with Object Storage Repositories, Restore to AWS (new in Update 4), Restore to Azure and Restore to Azure Stack (new in Update 4).

PowerShell is still an Option:

For those that would like to configure these accounts outside of the Backup & Replication Console, there is a full complement of PowerShell commands available via the Veeam PowerShell Snap-in.

As an example, as part of my Configure-Veeam GitHub Project I have a section that configures a new Scale Out Backup Repository with an Object Storage Repository Capacity Tier backed by Amazon S3. The initial part of that code is to create a new Amazon Storage Account.

For a full list of PowerShell capabilities related to this, click here.

So there you go…a very quick look at another new enhancement in Update 4 for Backup & Replication 9.5 that might have gone under the radar.

References:

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/vsphere/cloud_credentials.html?ver=95u4

NSX Bytes – What’s New in NSX-T 2.4

A little over two years ago in Feburary of 2017 VMware released NSX-T 2.0 and with it came a variety of updates that looked to continue to push NSX-T beyond that of NSX-v while catching up in some areas where the NSX-v was ahead. The NSBU has had big plans for NSX beyond vSphere for as long as I can remember, and during the NSX vExpert session we saw how this is becoming more of a reality with NSX-T 2.4. NSX-T is targeted at more cloud native workloads which also leads to a more devops focused marketing effort on VMware’s end.

NSX-T’s main drivers relate to new data centre and cloud architectures with more hetrogeneality driving a different set of requirements to that of vSphere that focuses around multi-domain environments leading to a multi-hypervisor NSX platform. NSX-T is highly extensible and will address more endpoint heterogeneity in future releases including containers, public clouds and other hypervisors.

What’s new in NSX-T 2.4:

[Update] – The Offical Release Notes for NSX-T 2.4 have been releases and can be found here. As mentioned by Anthony Burke

I only touch on the main features below…This is a huge release and I don’t think i’ve seen a larger set of release notes from VMware. There are also a lot of Resolved Issues in the release which are worth a look for those who have already deployed NSX-T in anger. [/Update]

While there are a heap of new features in NSX-T 2.4, for me one of the standout enhancements is the migration options that now exist to take NSX-v platforms and migrate them to NSX-T. While there will be ongoing support for both platforms, and in my opinion NSX-v still hold court in more traditional scenarios, there is clear direction on the migration options.

In terms of the full list of what’s new:

  • Policy Management
    • Simplified UI with rich visualisations
    • Declarative Policy API to configure networking, security and services
  • Advanced Network Services
    • IPv6 (L2, L3, BGP, FW)
    • ENS Support for Edge and DFW
    • VPN (L2, L3)
    • BGP Enhancements (allow-as in, multi-path-asn relax, iBGP support, Inter-SR routing)
  • Intrinsic Security
    • Identity Based FW
    • FQDN/URL whitelisting for DFW
    • L7 based application signatures for DFW
    • DFW operational enhancements
  • Cloud and Container Updates
    • NSX Containers (Scale, CentOS support, NCP 2.4 updates)
    • NSX Cloud (Shared NSX gateway placement in Transit VPC/VNET, VPN, N/S Service Insertion, Hybrid Overlay support, Horizon Cloud on Azure integration)
  • Platform Enhancements
    • Converged NSX Manager appliance with 3 node clustering support
    • Profile based installs, Reboot-less maintenance mode upgrades, in-place mode upgrades for vSphere Compute Clusters, n-VDS visualization, Traceflow support for centralized services like Edge Firewall, NAT, LB, VPN
    • v2T Migration: In-built UI wizards for “vDS to N-vDS” as well as “NSX-v to NSX-T” in-place migrations
    • Edge Platform: Proxy ARP support, Bare Metal: Multi-TEP support, In-band management, 25G Intel NIC support
Infrastructure as Code and NSX-T:

As mentioned in the introduction, VMware is targeting cloud native and devops with NSX-T and there is a big push for being able to deploy and consume networking services across multiple platforms with multiple tools via the NSX API. At it’s heart, we see here the core of what was Nicira back in the day. NSX (even NSX-v) has always been underpinned by APIs and as you can see below, the idea of consuming those APIs with IaC, no matter what the tool is central to NSX-T’s appeal.

Conclusion:

It’s time to get into NSX-T! Lots of people who work in and around the NSBU have been preaching this for the last three to four years, but it’s now apparent that this is the way of the future and that anyone working on virtualization and cloud platforms needs to get familiar with NSX-T. There has been no better time to set it up in the lab and get things rolling.

For a more in depth look at the 2.4 release, head to the official launch blog post here.

References:

vExpert NSX Briefing

https://blogs.vmware.com/networkvirtualization/2019/02/introducing-nsx-t-2-4-a-landmark-release-in-the-history-of-nsx.html/

Update 4 for Service Providers – Tenant Connectivity with Cloud Connect Gateway Pools

When Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4 went Generally Available a couple of weeks ago I posted a What’s in it for Service Providers blog. In that post I briefly outlined all the new features and enhancements in Update 4 as it related to our Veeam Cloud and Service Providers. As mentioned each new major feature deserves it’s own seperate post. I’ve covered off Tape as a Service and RBAC Self Service, and today i’m focusing on a much requested feature…Cloud Connect Gateway Pools

As a reminder here are the top new features and enhancements in Update 4 for VCSPs.

Gateway Pools for Cloud Connect

Cloud Connect has become the central mechanism for connectivity and communication between multiple Veeam services. When first launched with Cloud Connect Backup in v8 of Backup & Replication, the Cloud Connect Gateways where used for all secure communications between tenant backup server instances and the Veeam Cloud and Service Provider (VCSP) Cloud Connect backup infrastructure. This expanded to support Cloud Connect Replication in v9 and from there we have added multiple products that rely on communications brokered by Cloud Connect Gateways.

As of today Cloud Connect Gateways facilitate:

  • Cloud Connect Backup
  • Cloud Connect Replication
  • Full and Partial Failovers for Cloud Connect Replication
  • Remote Console Access
  • Veeam Availability Console Tenant and Agent Management
  • Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 Self Service

With regards to acting as the broker for Cloud Connect Backup or Replication, prior to Update 4 the only way in which a VCSP could design and deploy the Gateways was in an all or nothing approach when it came to configuring the IP address and DNS for the service endpoint. When considering VCSPs that also provide connectivity such as MPLS for their customers it meant that to leverage direct connections that might be private the options where to either use the public address or setup a whole new Cloud Connect environment for the customer.

Now with Update 4 and Gateway Pools a VCSP can configure one or many Gateway Pools and allocate one or more Cloud Connect Gateways to those pools. From there, tenants can be assigned to Gateway Pools.

Cloud Gateways in a Gateway Pool operate no differently to regular Cloud Gateways. As with previous Cloud Gateways, If the primary gateway is unavailable, the logic built into Veeam Backup & Replication will failover to another Cloud Gateway in the same pool.

If tenants are not assigned a Cloud Gateway Pool they can use only gateways that are not a part of any cloud gateway pool. That situation is warned in the UI when configuring the gateways.

Wrap Up:

The introduction of Cloud Connect Gateway Pools un Update 4 was undertaken due to direct feedback from our VCSPs who wanted more flexibility in the way in which the Cloud Gateways where deployed and configured for customers. Not only can they be used to seperate tenants connecting from public and private networks, but they can also be used for Quality of Service by assigning a Gateway Pool to specific tenants. They can also be used to control access into a VCSPs Cloud Connect infrastructure if located in different geographic locations.

For a great overview and design considerations of Cloud Connect Gateway Pools and Gateways themselves, check out Luca’s Cloud Connect Book here.

References:

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/cloud/cloud_gateway_pool.html?ver=95u4

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