Author Archives: Anthony Spiteri

Released: vCloud Director 9.0.0.2 – Important Networking Fixes!

Last week VMware put out a new point release for vCloud Director 9.0 (Build 7553273) for Service Providers. While there is nothing new in this release there are a significant number of resolved issues as listed in the release notes. One thing to mention is that even though this was released during a similar timeframe to NSX-v 6.4 there is no offical compatibility just yet.

Reading through the list of resolved issues there where some pretty impactful errors that seem to be related mostly to NSX operations and networking in general.

  • Deleting a Provider VDC can corrupt VXLAN network pools that are in use After you delete a Provider VDC, its associated VXLAN network pool becomes unusable by organization VDCs backed by other Provider VDCs.
  • The Redeploy an Edge Gateway from vCloud Director task succeeds instantly but the Edge does not actually redeploy in NSX When you attempt to redeploy an Edge Gateway from vCloud Director, the API initiates a task in vCloud Director and in vCenter Server but does not send a redeploy request to the NSX server. As a consequence, the Edge Gateway does not redeploy.
  • Registration of an NSX Server fails when you supply the credentials of an SSO user vCloud Director SSO users are not authorized to access an NSX endpoint required for registration, so registration fails.
  • Changes on Edge Gateway Services are not synchronized between vCloud Director and NSX When you modify one of the Edge Gateway Services, for example by creating a Static Route, the change is saved on the vCloud Director side but cannot be saved on the NSX server.
  • Creating or updating a firewall rule for an Advanced Gateway Portal with enabling the Show only user-defined rules toggle causes the action of the default firewall rule to change. When you create a new firewall rule or update an existing rule for an Advanced Gateway Portal, if you enable the Show only user-defined rules toggle, the action of the default firewall rule changes incorrectly to match the last modified rule.
  • Deleting an external network that uses a distributed virtual port group with a Private VLAN does not work When you try to delete an external network that is liked to a private VLAN associated with a distributed virtual port group (dvPortgroup), the deletion fails with an InternalError: Only single VLAN or trunk VLAN is supported error message.
  • You cannot add a DNAT rule configuring an original or a translated port or port range through the tenant portal When you attempt to add a DNAT rule from the Edge Gateway screen in the tenant portal, you cannot enter either a port or a port range in the Original Port and the Translated Port text boxes.
  • Creating a SNAT or a DNAT network rule by using a public IP address that is not associated to a particular network interface fails When you try to create a SNAT or a DNAT network rule for either an internal or an external interface in vCloud Director, if the public IP address is not added to a particular network interface, you receive a the following error message:
  • Configuring a static route fails if you set the gateway of an external network as a next hop IP address When you configure a static route for an organization network, if you enter the address of an existing default gateway in the Next Hop IP text box, saving the static route configuration fails with the following error message:

Good to seem them fixing issues quickly but it also tells me that a lot of people participating in the beta for 9.0 didn’t test deep enough against real word scenarios…a lot of what is listed above isn’t what you would consider corner cases. These issues should have bene picked up before going to GA. Possibly also shows that a lot of VCPP Service Providers haven’t upgraded to 9.0 just yet. In any case the vCloud product development team has been hard at work resolving the bugs and Service Providers should be confident deploying or upgrading to 9.0 now.

#LongLivevCD

If you are a vCAN SP and have the right entitlements follow this link to download vCloud Director 9.0.0.2:

References:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vCloud-Director-for-Service-Providers/9.0.0.2/rn/rel_notes_vcloud_director_9-0-0-2.html

 

 

NSX-v 6.4.0 Released! What’s in it for Service Providers

This week VMware released NSX-v 6.4.0 (Build 7564187) and with it comes a new UI Plug-in for vSphere Client (HTML5) which includes some new dashboards including a new Update Lifecycle Manager built right into the Web Client. Reading through the release notes, for me the biggest improvements seem to be around NSX Edges and Edge services. These are central to Service Providers who offer NSX services with vCloud Director or otherwise via their service offerings. There are also as usual, a number of Resolved Issues which can be skimmed through in the release notes page.

What’s New:

As mentioned above there is a lot to get through and there are a lot of new enhancements and features packed into this release. I’ve gone through and picked the major ones as they might pertain to Service Providers running NSX on their platforms. I’ve basically followed the sections in the Release Notes but summarised for those that don’t want to troll through the page. Ad the end of each section i’ve commented on the benefits of the improvements.

Security Services

  • Identity Firewall now supports user sessions on remote desktop and application servers (RDSH) sharing a single IP address, new “fast-path” architecture improves processing speed of IDFW rules. Active Directory integration now allows selective synchronization for faster AD updates.
  • Distributed Firewall adds layer-7 application-based context for flow control and micro-segmentation planning.
  • Distributed Firewall rules can now be created as stateless rules at a per DFW section level.
  • Distributed Firewall supports VM IP realization in the hypervisor. This allows users to verify if a particular VM IP is part of a securitygroup/cluster/resourcepool/host.

These security features listed above will make a lot of people happy and improves end user experience and the DFW supporting within the VM is a small but important feature.

NSX User Interface

  • Support for vSphere Client (HTML5): Introduces VMware NSX UI Plug-in for vSphere Client (HTML5).
  • HTML5 Compatibility with vSphere Web Client (Flash): NSX functionality developed in HTML5 (for example, Dashboard) remains compatible with both vSphere Client and vSphere Web Client, offering seamless experience for users who are unable to transition immediately to vSphere Client.
  • Improved Navigation Menu: Reduced number of clicks to access key functionality, such as Grouping Objects, Tags, Exclusion List and System Configuration.

It’s great to see NSX jump over to the HTML5 Web Client and even though it’s a small first step its a great preview of what’s to come in future releases. The fact that it goes both ways, meaning older flash clients still have the features is important as well.

Operations and Troubleshooting

  • Upgrade Coordinator provides a single portal to simplify the planning and execution of an NSX upgrade. Upgrade Coordinator provides a complete system view of all NSX components with current and target versions, upgrade progress meters, one-click or custom upgrade plans and pre- and post-checks.
  • A new improved HTML5 dashboard is available along with many new components. Dashboard is now your default homepage. You can also customize existing system-defined widgets, and can create your own custom widgets through API.
  • New System Scale dashboard collects information about the current system scale and displays the configuration maximums for the supported scale parameters. Warnings and alerts can also be configured when limits are approached or exceeded.
  • A Central CLI for logical switch, logical router and edge distributed firewall reduces troubleshooting time with centralized access to distributed network functions.
  • New Support Bundle tab is available to help you collect the support bundle through UI on a single click. You can now collect the support bundle data for NSX components like NSX Manager, hosts, edges, and controllers.
  • New Packet Capture tab is available to capture packets through UI.
  • Multi-syslog support for up to 5 syslog servers.
  • API improvements including JSON support. NSX now offers the choice or JSON or XML for data formats. XML remains the default for backwards compatibility.

There is a lot going on here but for me it continues to solidify the vision that Martin Casado had around Nicira in it being efficient in software to get a deep view of what’s happened and what’s happening in your network. The System Scale dashboard (shown below) also is a great way to get an understanding of how loaded an NSX environment is…one of my favourite news features.

NSX Edge Enhancements

  • Enhancement to Edge load balancer health check. Three new health check monitors have been added: DNS, LDAP, and SQL.
  • You can now filter routes for redistribution based on LE/GE in prefix length in the destination IP.
  • Support for BGP and static routing over GRE tunnels.
  • NAT64 provides IPv6 to IPv4 translation.
  • Faster failover of edge routing services.
  • Routing events now generate system events in NSX Manager.
  • Improvements to L3 VPN performance and resiliency.

I’ve highlighted this in red because the improvements above continue to build on a very strong foundation that is the NSX Edge Gateway that still continues vShield DNA. Though I’ve been away from the day to day of a service provider for almost a year and a half I recognise that these new features create a more enterprise class of edge device. The little thing added will make network engineers happy.

Conclusion:

Overall this looks like a strong release for NSX-v and good to see that there is still a ton of development going into the platform. Service providers have the most to gain from this release which is a good thing! The only thing that I do hope is that as a 6.x.0 release that it’s stable and without any major bugs…the history of these first major release builds hasn’t been great but hopefully that’s a thing of the past with 6.4.0.

EDIT: Just to clarify after a couple of comments, it seems that for the moment vCD 9.0 and 8.20 is not compatible with NSX-v 6.4.0 just yet. More news when it comes to hand.

Resources:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-NSX-for-vSphere/6.4/rn/releasenotes_nsx_vsphere_640.html

A Deeper Look at Insider Protection in 9.5 Update 3

With the release of Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 3 we introduced the concept of a Recycle Bin for customers sending offsite cloud backups to VCSPs using Veeam Cloud Connect. This deleted backup protection…or Insider Protection allows the VCSP to enable the deleted backups protection option for specific tenants and looks to add another level of data security for cloud based backups in the case of a malicious user gaining access to the Backup & Replication Console or in the case of accidental deletion by an administrator.

As shown above, this is set by checking a box (Also via PowerShell) in the properties of the tenant account. Once checked the SP will choose the retention period by setting the Keep deleted Backup files for <N> days option. With this option enabled, when a backup or a specific restore point in the backup chain is deleted or aged out from the cloud repository. The actual backup files are not deleted immediately, instead, they are moved to a _RecycleBin folder on the repositories.

Once moved, backup files in the recycle bin do not consume tenant quota however they obviously consume general storage. With that in mind it should be considered by the SP to charge for that used storage. I will release a post shortly detailing some tips on how best to size and charge for the recycle bin storage per client.

At the tenant end those backup files that are moved into the recycle bin are not registered and will not show up in the job information window. They can’t access or do anything with the files in the recycle bin. For the moment if a tenant wants to restore data they must contact the SP to obtain the necessary backup files. Once the retention period has expired all files that fall out of that period are deleted.

Basic Mechanics:

When the option is checked for a tenant a new folder is created under the _RecycleBin\<tenant> folder of the repository. In the case of a Scale Out Backup Repository there is a recycle bin folder created per extent which ensured that any split tenant VM files are processed locally and not between extents.

Once files in the repository start to age out the tenant folder will start to populate with backup files. If there is an event that triggers a change of retention or a VM removed from a job or the deletion of a whole job, any remaining VBK or VIB files in the tenant repository are moved into the recycle bin.

The files remain in the _RecycleBin folder until the retention period has passed or if the service provider moves them out of the folder for recovery purposes.

Working Example:

I have a Cloud Connect Backup account that I am using to back up five VMs that reside on premises, using a standard Backup Job with Forward Incrementals and a Synthetic Full done once a week. I have configured this job to keep two restore points.

I then have configured a secondary destination for the job via a Backup Copy Job to the Cloud Repository and I have set a GFS to happen weekly so I have a full archive offsite. If I hadn’t enabled GFS retention (for those running Update 3) a warning would appear as shown below.

Tip: If the tenant plans to create off-site copies of backed-up data with a backup copy job, it should enable GFS retention settings in the job properties. This way, Veeam Backup & Replication will be able to protect backups created by the job against an attack when a hacker reduces the job’s retention policy and creates a few incremental backups to remove backed-up data from the backup chain.

The Cloud Connect Tenant account has a deleted backup protection setting of 2 days configured as shown in the first image of this post.

Below is the local jobs folder structure:

Looking at the Cloud Connect repository (split over two SOBR extents) you can see that the main repository holds the VM backup files as per the job configuration. Notice the GFS _W files there as well.

Taking a look at the _RecycleBin folder for the tenant after a few days the aged out incremental will start to appear in the folder. Notice that there are no full backup files in the recycle bin at this stage.

Tip: The retention period will look at all backup jobs completed in a 24 hours period and have any expiring or deleted backup files moved into the recycle bin directory. This means that if you are copying up VMs that have a local backup interval of every 4 hours you will have six lots of backup files ageing out daily.

In this example I’m simulating an malicious attack or accidental deletion the VM (TPM03-RMQ-01/VM-120) from the backup. For the sake of this example we are deleting the VM from the Backup & Replication Console under Backups and Cloud. If the Included Archived copies option was chosen then the GFS weekly full backup file is also moved into the recycle bin.

Once the deletion process has been completed the _RecycleBin folder for the tenant will now be populated with the deleted full, plus three incremental files. If the Included Archived copies option was chosen then the GFS weekly full backup file is also moved into the recycle bin.

These will stay in the recycle bin until the retention period is met. From here these files can be transported back to the tenant to be recovered (see here for full process) from within the on-premises Backup & Replication console.

Conclusion:

As shown above, deleted backup protection or Insider Protection is an excellent enhancement to Cloud Connect Backup. It goes some way to having an air gapped backup in the cloud and protects against malicious attacks and rogue or clumsy administrators. There is a lot happening behind the scenes to make it work, however the concept is simple and this features extends the 3-2-1 rule by protecting that offsite copy as part of the Cloud Connect solution. VCSP’s should be looking to offer this as a value add to their clients and Veeam customers should be looking to take advantage of Cloud Connect Backup and Replication for their offsite backup and replication needs.

References:

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/cloud/cloud_connect_bin.html?ver=95

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/cloud/cloud_connect_bin_restore.html?ver=95

9.5 Update 3 Officially Compatible with VMware Cloud on AWS

At VMworld 2017 Veeam was announced as one of only two foundation Data Protection partners for VMware Cloud on AWS. This functionality was dependant on the release of Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 3 that contained the enhancements for it to interoperate with VMware Cloud on AWS locked down vCenter.

This week 9.5 Update has been listed on the VMware Compatibility Guide (VCG) for Data Protection.

In terms of what you now get in Update 3, there is little noticeable difference in the process to configure and run backup or replication jobs from within Veeam Backup & Replication. The VMware Cloud on AWS resources are treated as just another cluster so most actions and features of the core platform work as if the cloud based cluster was local or otherwise.

There were a few limitations that VMware have placed on the solution which means that our NFS based features such as Instant VM Recovery, Virtual Labs or Surebackups won’t work at this stage. HotAdd mode is the only supported backup transport mode (which isn’t a bad thing as it’s my preferred transport mode) which talks to a new VDDK library that is part of the VMC platform.

With that the following features work out of the box:

  • Backup with In Guest Processing
  • Restores to original or new locations
  • Backup Copy Jobs
  • Replication
  • Cloud Connect Backup
  • Windows File Level Recovery
  • Veeam Explorers

I’m really excited where VMware takes VMware Cloud on AWS and I see a lot of opportunities for the platform to be used as an availability resource. Over the next couple of months I’m hoping to be able to dive a little more into how Veeam can offer both backup and replication solutions for VMware Cloud on AWS.

Resources:

https://www.vmware.com/resources/compatibility/search.php?deviceCategory=vsanps&details=1&partner=594&releases=282&page=1&display_interval=10&sortColumn=Partner&sortOrder=Asc

2018

Looking back over the past couple of years I haven’t written a forward looking blog post about the year ahead since 2015 and as I sit here working through my notes on the first workday for 2018 I though that for the good of myself, I should have a think about what I want to achieve out of this year. A lot of people I know and people’s who’s blogs I follow the industry are very big on setting personal goals for the year, but that’s something that I don’t traditionally like doing. It’s not that I don’t have a plan or that I like to randomly see where the year takes me…historically I like things to kinda roll on.

If I think back over the past couple of years…or more specifically since I started working for Veeam I have achieved and ticked off a lot of personal goals. If I think about last year and the opportunities I had. Top of the list was that I delivered a VMworld Breakout Session and be part of a main stage demo in front of two and half thousand people at VeeamON which certainly ticked the boxes in terms of public speaking events.

Beyond that I learnt a lot about working in a Marketing Organization and the behind the scene people engine(s) that keeps a successful software company like Veeam rolling. I learnt how products are positioned, how collateral and content is developed and also how to interact with different areas of the business as products are developed and marketed. Being the Technical end of a Marketing Organization is an interesting place to be and there is a balance that I learnt needed to be had to bridge the gap between the technical and the non-technical.

Travel was something that I didn’t mind doing and as I pointed out in one of my last blog posts from 2017. I adjusted to the travel well, and without question I am looking forward to my travels in 2018. The one thing that did catch me out was the impact that it had on content creation and tinker time. That was a lesson learnt and I am extremely motivated to ensure I work in and around the travel to ensure I pick up my game compared to last year.

I’ve talked a lot in the past about work/life balance and the challenges of working from home and that is something that I am always aware of. Last year the balance was pretty much spot on, so this year I’m hoping that it remains the same…because if that balance isn’t kept everything else could be considered a waste of time!

In terms of what I want to try and achieve this year:

  • Continual Personal and Career Development (don’t rest on the past, continue to push and strive to better myself in every way)
  • Excel at my job and strive to always improve (this helps me, my workmates, customers and the company)
  • Get at least two quality blog posts out a week (not for the sake of it but to create great content)
  • Deep Dive into at least one Technology per month (This is paramount for my job and career)
  • Read at least one book a month (I’ve never been a big reader but need to push myself here)
  • More Home Automation (think this is on everyone’s list but something that I want to do as a hobby)

I’m sure there is more and I am also sure I can be more specific but for the purpose of this exercise I’ll leave it at that list.

As I start to settle into the new year I will be thinking about how I can continue to move forward both professionally…together with my my team as we shift from Marketing to Product Strategy bringing with it new challenges and opportunities to learn new skills and contribute to Veeam’s success…as well as personally as strive to be content about where I am in life with family central to that.

Here is to 2018!

#GoodbyeLament

Top Posts 2017

2017 is done and dusted and looking back on the blog over the last twelve months I’ve not been able to keep the pace up compared to the previous two years in terms of churning out content. In 2017 I managed 90 posts (including this one) which was down on the 124 last year and the 110 in 2016. My goal has always been to put out at least two quality posts a week, however I found that the travel component of my new role has impacted my productivity and tinkering time, which is where a lot of the content comes from…however it was still a record year for site visits (up over 200K) and I did manage to publish the 400th blog post on Virtualization is Life! since going live in 2012.

Looking back through the statistics generated via JetPack, I’ve listed the Top 10 Blog Posts from the last 12 months. This year the VCSA, NSX, vCenter Upgrades/Migrations and Homelab posts dominating the top ten. As I posted about a couple months back the common 503 error for the VCSA is a trending search topic. I was also happy that my post on my Working from Home experience over the last 12 months resonated with a lot of people.

  1. Quick Fix: VCSA 503 Service Unavailable Error
  2. HomeLab – SuperMicro 5028D-TNT4 Storage Driver Performance Issues and Fix
  3. ESXi 6.5 Storage Performance Issues and Fix
  4. What I’ve Learnt from 12 Months Working From Home
  5. NSX Bytes: Updated – NSX Edge Feature and Performance Matrix
  6. Upgrading Windows vCenter 5.5 to 6.0 In-Place: Issues and Fixes
  7. Homelab – Lab Access Made Easy with Free Veeam Powered Network
  8. NSX Bytes: NSX-v 6.3 Host Preparation Fails with Agent VIB module not installed
  9. Quick Look – vSphere 6.5 Storage Space Reclamation
  10. NSX Edge vs vShield Edge: Part 1 – Feature and Performance Matrix

In terms of the Top 10 new posts created in 2017, the list looks more representative of my Veeam content with a lot of interest for Veeam PN and also, as I would hope my vCloud Director posts.

  1. ESXi 6.5 Storage Performance Issues and Fix
  2. What I’ve Learnt from 12 Months Working From Home
  3. Upgrading Windows vCenter 5.5 to 6.0 In-Place: Issues and Fixes
  4. Homelab – Lab Access Made Easy with Free Veeam Powered Network
  5. NSX Bytes: NSX-v 6.3 Host Preparation Fails with Agent VIB module not installed
  6. migrate2vcsa – Migrating vCenter 6.0 to 6.5 VCSA
  7. Veeam is now in the Network Game! Introducing Veeam Powered Network.
  8. NestedESXi – Network Performance Improvements with Learnswitch
  9. Released: vCloud Director 9.0 – The Most Significant Update To Date!
  10. VMware Flings: Top 5 – 2017 Edition

This year I was honoured to have this blog voted #19 in the TopvBlog2017 which I am very proud and I’d like to thank the readers and supporters of this blog for voting for me! And thanks must also go to my site sponsors who are all listed on the right hand side of this page.

Again while I found it difficult to keep up the pace with previous years I fully intend to keep on pushing this blog by keeping it strong to it’s roots of vCloud Director and core VMware technologies like NSX and vSAN. There will be a lot of Veeam posts around product deep dives, release info and I’ll continue to generate content around what I am passionate about…and that includes all things hosting, cloud and availability!

I hope you can join me in 2018!

#LongLivevCD

A Year of Travel – A Few Interesting Stats

This year was my first full year working for Veeam and my role being global, requires me to travel to locations and events where my team presents content and engages with technical and social communities. We also travel to various Veeam related training and enablement events throughout the year as well as customer and partner meetings where and when required. I had set expectations about what a travel year might look like and in truth I found 2017 to be just right in terms of time away working verses being at home working and also being with the family.

Without doubt the highlight of the year was VeeamON in New Orleans where I was able to participate in an industry event working for the vendor holding the show. Other highlights include presenting at VMworld, attending and presenting at a number of VeeamON and VMware Forums, Tours and user groups around APJ, attending EMEA SE Training in Warsaw and my first visit to Russia to meet with our R&D teams. I started the year with Sales Kick off in Orlando and finished with a team meeting in Boston, Thanksgiving in Phoenix and finally AWS re:Invent in Las Vegas.

So…what does all that travel look like?

Being homed in Perth, Western Australia I’m pretty much in the most isolated capital city in the world, meaning any flight is going to be significant. Even just flying to Sydney takes four to five hours…the same time it takes me to fly to Singapore. I love looking at stats and there are a number of tools out there that manage flight info. I use Tripit to keep track of all my tips, and there are now a number of sites that let you import your flight data to analyis.

With that my raw stats for 2017 are shown below:

Trips 17
Days 104
Distance 262,769 km
Cities 24
Countries 9

Upon reflection I probably didn’t travel as much as I thought I would with my away from home percentage being a relatively modest 28.4% of which I know isn’t high compared with others in my team, others at Veeam and certainly others in the industry. Where I did come out on top was in the distance travelled. Almost 263 thousand kilometers…a byproduct of living in Perth.

Of those 104 days away apparently I spent nearly 15 days in the air which is amazing when you think about it. When I travel to the USA I do take some of the longest routes in the world however my longest flight was not SYD-DFW but LAX-MEL.

I took 67 total flights across 21 airports and 6 airlines.

Interestingly I made it 70% to the moon in terms of distance, flew mostly on a Saturday which surprised me and my average flight time to 5:12 hours.

In terms of delays I think I got off pretty lightly with only 6 hours of departure delays and 4 hours of arrival delays…though I did have an interesting experience on my way back from VeeamON that technically delayed me a whole day…the less talked about that the better 🙂

Those that know me know that I am a bit of a plane snob and though I don’t have the plane nerd knowledge of Rick Vanover, I do like my planes big, new, shiny and modern. I still can’t go past the A380 and A330 but of late, the more I travel to Singapore the more I appreciate the more modern 737s.

So that’s a quick round up of what my year looked like living the life of a Global Evangelist/Technologist at Veeam. In one years time i’ll be very interested to see how 2018 shaped up compared to 2017!

References:

https://www.jetitup.com/MyStats/See/?name=Anthony~Spiteri

All stats were generated by Jet It Up and flight info was imported from Tripit.

Quick Look: Installing Veeam Powered Network Direct from a Linux Repo

Last week, Veeam Powered Network (Veeam PN) was released to GA. As a quick reminder Veeam PN allows administrators to create, configure and connect site-to-site or point-to-site VPN tunnels easily through an intuitive and simple UI all within a couple of clicks. Previously during the RC period there where two options for deployment…The appliance was available through the Azure Marketplace or downloadable from the veeam.com website and deployable on-premises from an OVA.

With the release of the GA a third option is available which is installation direct from the Veeam Linux Repositories. This gives users the option to deploy their own Ubuntu Linux server and install the packages required through the Advanced Package Tool (APT). This is also the mechanism that works in the background to update Veeam PN through the UI via the Check for Updates button under Settings.

The requirements for installation are as follows:

  • Ubuntu 16.04 and above
  • 1 vCPU (Minimum)
  • 1 GB vRAM (Minimum)
  • 16 GB of Hard Drive space
  • External Network Connectivity

The Azure Marketplace Image and the OVA Appliance have been updated to GA build 1.0.0.380.

Installation Steps:

To install Veeam PN and it’s supporting modules you need to first add the Veeam Linux Repository to you system and configure APT to be on the lookout for the Veeam PN packages. To do this you need to download and add the Veeam Software Repository Key, add Veeam PN to the list of sources in APT and run an APT update.

Once done you need to install two packages via the apt-get install command. As shown below there is the Server and UI component installed. This will pick up a significant list of dependancies that need to be installed as well.

There is a lot that is deployed and configured as it goes through the package installs and you may be prompted along the way to ask to overwrite the existing iptables rules if any existing on the system prior to install. Once completed you should be able to go to the Veeam PN web portal and perform the initial configuration.

The username to use at login will be the root user of your system.

So that’s it…an extremely easy and quick way to deploy Veeam Power Network without having to download the OVA or deploy through the Azure Marketplace.

As a reminder, i’ve blogged about the three different use cases for Veeam PN:

Clink on the links to visit the blog posts that go through each scenario and download or deploy the GA from the Veeam.com website or Azure Marketplace and now directly from the Veeam Linux Repos and give it a try. Again, it’s free, simple, powerful and a great way to connect or extend networks securely with minimal fuss.

Quick Look: Veeam Agent for Linux 2.0 – Now With Cloud Connect

Just over a year ago Veeam Agent for Linux version 1.0 was released and for me still represents an important milestone for Veeam. During various presentations over the last twelve months I have talked about the fact that Linux backups haven’t really changed for twenty or so years and that the tried and trusted method for backing up Linux systems was solid…yet antiquated. For me, the GitLab backup disaster in Feburary highlighted this fact and the Veeam Agent for Linux takes Linux backups out of the legacy and into the now.

Yesterday, Veeam Agent for Linux 2.0 (Build 2.0.0.400) was released and with it came a number of new features and enhancements improving on the v1.1 build released in May. Most important for me is the ability to now backup straight to a Cloud Connect Repository.

Integration with Veeam Cloud Connect provides the following options:

  • Back up directly to a cloud repository: Veeam Agent for Linux provides a fully integrated, fast and secure way to ship backup files directly to a Cloud Connect repository hosted by one of the many Veeam-powered service providers.
  • Granular recovery from a cloud repository: Volume and file-level recovery can be performed directly from a backup stored within the cloud repository, without having to pull the entire backup on-premises first.
  • Bare-metal recovery from a cloud repository: The updated Veeam Recovery Media allows you to connect to your service provider, select the required restore point from the cloud repository and restore your entire computer to the same or different hardware.
Configuration Overview:

To install, you need to download the relevant Linux Packages from here. For my example below, I’m installing on an Ubuntu machine but we do support a number of popular Linux Distros as explained here.

Once installed you want to apply a Server License to allow backing up to Cloud Connect Repositories.

Before configuring a new job through the Agent for Linux Menu you can add Cloud Providers via the agent CLI. There are a number of cli menu options as shown below.

From here, you can use the cli to configure a new Backup Job but i’ve shown the process though the Agent UI. If you preconfigure the Service Provider with the cli once you select Veeam Cloud Connect Repository you don’t need to enter in the details again.

Once done and the job has run you will see that we have the backup going direct to the Cloud Connect Repository!

From the cli you can also get a quick overview of the job status.

Wrap Up:

I’ve been waiting for this feature for a long time and with the amount of Linux server instances (both physical and virtual) that exist today across on-premises, partner hosts IaaS platforms, or hyper-scale clouds, I hope that Veeam Cloud & Service Providers really hone in on the opportunity that exists with this new feature.

For more on What’s New in 2.0 of Veeam Agent for Linux you click here.

References:

https://www.veeam.com/veeam_agent_linux_2_0_whats_new_wn.pdf

Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 3 – Top New Features

Earlier today we at Veeam released Update 3 for Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 (Build 9.5.0.1536) and with it comes a couple of very anticipated new features. Back in May at VeeamOn we announced a number of new features that where scheduled to be released as part of the next version of Backup & Replication (v10), however things have worked out such that we have brought some of those features forward into Update 3 for v9.5. It’s a credit to the Product Managers, QA and R&D that we have been able to deliver these ground breaking features into a Update release.

Together with Update 3 we have also released:

Focusing back on Backup & Replication…Update 3 is a fairly significant update and contains a number of enhancements and fixes with a lot of those enhancements aimed at improving the scalability of our flagship Backup & Replication platform. The biggest and most anticipated feature is the built in Agent Management meaning Backup & Replication can now manage virtual, physical and cloud-based workloads from a single console. Further to that we have added offical support for VMware Cloud on AWS and vCloud Director 9.0.

Below are the major features included in Update 3.

  • Built-in agent management
  • Insider protection for Veeam Cloud Connect
  • Data location tagging
  • IBM Spectrum Virtualize Integration
  • Universal Storage Integration API

Other notable enhancements and feature updates include supportability for 4TB virtual disks when using Direct Restore to Azure and support for SQL Server 2017 with that also now a possible database target for the platform. There is extended support for the latest Windows 10, Server and Hyper-V releases. In terms of storage apart from the addition of IBM support and the Universal Storage Integration API we added enhancements to Cisco HyperFlex, Data Domain and HPE 3PAR StoreServ as well as support for Direct NFS to be more efficient with HCI platforms like Nutanix.

For the agents you can now do backup mapping for seeding and restore from backup copies. For VMware there is a significant fix for a condition which reset CBT data for all disks belonging to a VM rather than just the resized disk and there is support again for non encrypted NDB transport.

There is also a lot of new features and enhancements for VCPS and i’ll put together a couple of seperate posts over the next few days outlining those feature…though I did touch on a few of them in the Update 3 RTM post here.

A quick note also for VCSPs that you can upgrade from the RTM to the GA build without issue.

For a full list check out the release notes below and download the update here.

References:

https://www.veeam.com/kb2353

 

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